More on Vodafone and their egregious overcharging

Over at David’s the trolls are on attack, note they only attack over at David’s rather than come to my blog for a hiding. However not a one has bothered to actually debate the issue, playing me and my father for some strange reason.

They also mistake my outrage as an inability to pay the bill, which is so far from the truth it isn’t funny, they also seem to think that I expect the state to bail me out, which I most definately do not, I do however expect the Commerce Commission to investigate what to my mind is an egregious example of price gouging.


Vodafone moves to flat-rate data on roaming | The Register

Note also that Vodafone UK has this year introduced a flat rate for data in Europe; at least in the parts of Europe where Vodafone operates, of €12 for 24 hours connectivity.

Squarely aimed at business users connecting their laptop computers when roaming, the service is intended to make billing simpler, as well as offering a cheaper option for data-heavy users. Anyone roaming to a non-Vodafone network, or exceeding the 50MB cap, will find themselves paying their normal international rate, which could confuse further; though hopefully the majority won’t suffer from either scenario.

Of course this in direct contrast to Vodafone’s answer to Darren Greenwood that the policy is the same for all of Vodafone’s customers worldwide. Now if you use that example for my 20 day trip to Australia and approximately 250Mb of data consumed, my data bill would have been $480, only ten times my usual bill and a far more acceptable pricing regime for a premium service. $7000 for the same amount of data is simply theft writ large and Vodafone are very definately having a lend of their customers.

Of course don’t expect Sonic, DiM and other socialist lickspittles to understand the complexities of the issues, they are way to busy casting aspersions on me and my father.

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  • Spanishbride

    Sigh….. Whaleoil don't waste your time replying it is just encouraging him.

    He obviously has a problem with rich people and thinks that we are rich and therefore should not squeal when we are being ripped off unlike the poor downtrodden underclasses who ( their choice ) end up paying usury rates to lenders because they don't know of or have access to other less expensive options.
    Rich people apparently never make mistakes and should know better so it is funny if they are ripped off.

    ha bloody ha
  • rickyjj

    Haha I don't have a problem with rich people. I don't even think you're particularly rich. But Whale Oil spends a lot of time taking the piss out of the downtrodden and the people who try and help them so yeah you are right about one thing – it is funny. I can't wait to read about the Commerce Commission laughing in your faces.

  • Bok

    rickyjj did you get bullied at school? Maybe your mother dressed you funny?

    You have just shown why a culture of welfare breeds leeches. I do not know one person who have made their own money

    and not piss it away, have the attitude to money you speak of.  

    "Most people wouldn't scurry around in a drain for 10c… And if you're so rich then this is exactly the same thing. Rich people certainly don't have sleepless nights over $7000!"

    Most people who understand money will happily pay over the odds for something that is really worth that to them, but fight like hell to protect themselves from being ripped off.

    Spanish bride shame on you, you have children, you should know that the Hollow woman demands that we give children a forum. 

  • http://bluebellenz.blogspot.com/ Bluebelle

    I don't actually see what Whale Oil's financial status has to do with the point. The charges he is facing are horrendous and
    he is right to query them – and doing a public service by telling us all about it.

  • Grant

    Rickyjj, as you're obviously new to the planet, what you're actually seeing is the free market, you know that thing you seem to so avidly despise, at work. What will happen is that Vodafone will become wary of the adverse publicity, and they will start to find their revenue stream for that particular product starting to dry up as more and more people realise they are being gouged. If they think it's a good idea the company will then move to address the problem by altering the charging regime, running an ad campaign, and doing all the usual corporate product relaunch stuff, and with any luck the old margin / volume formula will kick in and the company will make more many from lots of customers than it will from ripping off one very irate one. Of course the company could decide to do nothing at all in which case no one will use their service when overseas and they will be then be thought of unkindly by customers and shunned accordingly. Result = Less income.

    In essence Whaleoil's protest at the unexpected charging is just one of the many forces that drive the market.

    It sure beats having all your pricing worked out for you by the government, or maybe you'd prefer that option.

    G

  • rickyjj

    If you've got so much money then why do you care?

    Most people wouldn't scurry around in a drain for 10c… And if you're so rich then this is exactly the same thing. Rich people certainly don't have sleepless nights over $7000!

     

    Price gouging, by the way, "is similar to profiteering but can be distinguished by being short-term and localized, and by a restriction to essentials such as food, clothing, shelter, medicine and equipment needed to preserve life, limb and property." Given that broadband is not an essential service, that Vodafone's prices in Australia have been fairly constant and that there is plenty of competition in Australia (as you said yourself, you could have got the same service for $50), the one thing your idiocy in incurring a $7000 bill is not is an "egregious example of price gouging".

  • Whaleoil

    Actually I argue that for a blogger broadband is an essential service. You and the other fools seem not to realise that we are being had a lend of by Vodafone. You wouldn't tolerate differential pricing between North Island and South Island so why do you tolerate this?

    No-one has adequately justified how Vodafone can charge an outrageous $30 per Mb for data that wouldn't cost them much more than 1c to transmit other than becasue they can. Well I am saying they can't and shouldn't. 

     

     

  • rickyjj

    "No-one has adequately justified how Vodafone can charge an outrageous $30 per Mb for data that wouldn't cost them much more than 1c to transmit other than becasue they can."

     

    Prada can stick a label on a bag made for a couple of dollars and charge thousands for it. How can they justify that?

     

    Wait, I know. It's called the free market.

     

    Look if Vodafone had a monopoly on data usage in Australia you would definitely have a point. You could argue that you had to use broadband and had no choice but to pay $30 per Mb, charges which are definitely excessive.

     

    But at the end of the day you did have a choice. There were a number of far cheaper options. Your problem came about through your failure to investigate the pricing reasonably, especially given the amount of data you used.

     

  • Whaleoil

    Still doesn't address the problem even your cute little example. Further there is no choice in many of the areas that I went to in Australia, it is Telstra or Telstra or perhaps Telstra and so you cop the $30 fees, through no other option. The funny thing is though if you are an Australian in the same place you only get charged $0.05 per Mb, so this isn't a matter of choices it is a matter of nationality, same goes for an Aussie here, they get stiffed whilst NZ'ers enjoy 4c per Mb…..so do you actually want to try to justify it or still intent of having a laugh at my expense.

  • rickyjj

    "there is no choice in many of the areas that I went to in Australia"

     

    I thought you guys said you could have signed up to a provider in Aussie and only paid $50? That sounds like a choice to me.

     

    "The funny thing is though if you are an Australian in the same place you only get charged $0.05 per Mb, so this isn't a matter of choices it is a matter of nationality, same goes for an Aussie here, they get stiffed whilst NZ'ers enjoy 4c per Mb"

     

    Do Australian citizens with a Vodafone NZ contract pay less too? Does Ralph Norris have to pay more for mobile data over there cos he's a Kiwi? Or is it nothing to do with nationality and maybe something to do with who your provider is? If you were going to be over there so long and use so much data you should have signed up with an Australian provider. It would have been much cheaper. It was your choice not to.

  • Whaleoil

    No it is not possible to sign up for a temporary data card…you cannot have prepaid 3g…so agoan you have failed to answer the questions…there is no choice.

    BTW there is no way to measure the Mb usage when you are using the thing, so how do you know…..Vodafone admit this as they don’t know the usage until the end of the billing month, so if they don’t know how is a customer supposed to know.

    Now see if you can answer that one…. 

  • rickyjj

    I'm not talking about using Vodafone. It's clearly stupidly expensive to use Vodafone NZ in Aussie. You should have just bought a data card from Telstra, it would have been what, $500 tops? My old Telecom one was something like that and I'm assure Aussie ones would be around that too. Then pay for a month mobile broadband from Telstra. So temporary in the sense that you wouldn't be signing a contract. It would have been expensive yes, but overall still 1/10th of the price you paid from Vodafone NZ.

  • Adolf fiinkensein

    You demonstrate that nasty streak which is unique to leftists. Jealousy and envy. Whaleoil and other 'righties' actually 'do' more for genuinely unfortunate people than you and your thousands of pseudo do-gooders could ever think about.  Your violin is out of tune.

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