Big Changes in the Media

Mediaworks is bleeding cash out of its arse. Unsurprising really given the parlous state of their repeating at 3News at the moment. Plus some of their talkshows are tres-boring, with the exception of Michael Laws. You need to shake trees and being a mostly pinko media company ain’t going to pay the bills.

Meanwhile over at Fairfax my numerous spies tell me that a series of major changes effective immediately have been announced.

Suburban Newspapers’ editor-in-chief, David Kemeys (interesting friends list, looks like SST is about to become The Red Rag) has been appointed editor of the Sunday Star-Times and David Gadd, current Stuff.co.nz editor for the Auckland region, has been appointed chief of staff for Fairfax Sundays, that includes the Star-Times and Sunday News.

Sunday Star-Times deputy editor Miriyana Alexander, considered the current brains behind the paper, has been given the arse sideways and will take up an undefined role at Fairfax’s head office at the Viaduct. Staff liked her and are stunned she is going.

Word has it that all journalists and repeaters are being ordered to write for online as well as print. They feel they are bleeding from the onslaught of new media. They would be better off buying in online new media (bloggers) than trying to get repeaters to attempt being blo-jo’s. Most are spectacular failures in their print endeavours, why would it be any different online?

They should really think about hiring our Rachel for some sort of role there, she just oozes class.

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  • harpoon

    “… David Kemeys (inter­est­ing friends list, looks like SST is about to become The Red Rag) ”

    Errrr … wot? Meaningless snide utterance. You well know that a Facebook ‘friend’ is not necessarily the same as a real personal friend.

  • oldgolfer

    Looks like the same old Fairfax trick – consolidate, consolidate, squeeze. It hasn’t, of course, worked in any area of Fairfax’s operation. Staff levels so shredded those left appear to have been captured by minority groups eager to push their own barrows. It shows daily in The Press which has taken on a green hue. Watch the struggling Sundays with interest, but doubt the new man can reverse the sales rot. The major problem is, the papers are tedious and full of what we learned the day before. No flair. No originality. No drive. All power to the blogs.

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