What about peak politician?

You may have heard about peak oil, Andrew Sullivan even blogs about possibility of peak lawyer:

Over the past 20 years, the share of the nation’s GDP attributable to the legal services sector has deteriorated significantly. In the late 1980s, the legal services sector represented slightly more than 2% of GDP (the same percentage as in the mid-1970s). As of 2009, that figure had declined to 1.37%. Contrary to the standard narrative within legal academia, which assumes an increasing or at least steady demand for legal services relative to overall economic growth, the demand for legal services within the American economy has been declining, relative to the rest of the economy, for the past two decades. In other words, “law” (as an economic entity) appears to be a mature industry in relative decline.

I’m wondering though, what is peak politician? and when do you think we are likely to hit it, or have we passed peak politician already?

  • MANINBLACK

    hopefully.. there is a way to many people pretenting to be important.

  • Richard

    The MP’s in parliament have been capped at 120ish for years while the population has increased, so similar to lawyers the percentage will be dropping. At a local level the supercity in Auckland and potential supercity amalgamations elsewhere plus the replacing of health boards with statutory managers has seen a decrease in politician numbers…

  • MrV

    We reached peak political IQ many years ago.

  • Anonymous Economist

    Greece & Italy hit “Peak Politician” a couple of weeks ago – and so are now governed by unelected, appointed economics and law professors

    Once the European tsunami hits home, it wouldn’t surprise me in the least to see Blinglish & co sidelined, and say Brash brought in as appointed minister of finance with Key there as PM only in name. 

    (In fact, in his 2025 taskforce report, Brash suggested just this option – that fiscal policy is too important to be left to politicians).   Banksie’s cap will have much the same effect (or, rather, it would, if there were no exceptions to the spending cap!)

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