National Selection FAQ, Ctd

What are the do’s and dont’s with social media during a selection process? ( outside of National Party constitution)

You are best avoiding any comment on social media as it will likely only cause you problems. The constitution prohibits publicity, in any media and while it is vague it appears to be catch all. Section 102 (b) is the rule to read. The punishment in Section 102 (c) is a joke, but better you don’t have opponents hammering you on this.

The same applies to not letting the party hierarchy cause you problems by breaking rules, as while they should be impartial they meddle all the time and cause enough problems as it is.

  • LesleyNZ

    Disagree with this. I don’t want to vote for impartial MP’s. I want to know what they think. No 1 rule for Social Media – have wisdom and be sensible in commenting and don’t get personal. If MP’s don’t make comment then you feel as if they don’t care. Social Media is a wonderful communication tool and if the National Party are advising their MP’s and members to avoid commenting then that is not wise. Just don’t do what Megan Woods did yesterday. Now that was foolish and not at all wise. http://www.whaleoil.co.nz/2012/06/labour-is-the-nasty-party-ctd-33/
    Proverbs gives some good advice – Prov. 15:2  “The tongue of the wise uses knowledge rightly, but the mouth of fools pours forth foolishness.”

    • http://www.whaleoil.co.nz Whaleoil

      Yep but National Party rules stop candidates in selection from having blogs, using Facebook and Twitter.

      • LesleyNZ

        Maybe if they did allow it, it would make selection easier – to sort out the wheat from the chaff.
        Meaning – separate the wheat from the chaff:
        to choose the things or people that are of high quality from a group of mixed quality A preliminary look through the applications will help you to separate the wheat from the chaff.
        http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/separate+the+wheat+from+the+chaff

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