A small hole for Mars, a giant hole for mankind

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Curiosity drills a hole that is 16mm across (5/8inch).

BBC Reports

Nasa’s Mars rover Curiosity has turned its drill in rock for the first time.

The big rover had previously used just the hammer action on the tool, but it has now progressed to operating the device in a rotary mode as well.

New pictures sent back from the robot show a small, shallow, rounded hole that is surrounded by fine tailings.  

Soon, Curiosity will be commanded to drill up to 5cm into rock to obtain a powdered sample that can be delivered to the vehicle’s onboard labs.

I guess we can all get a little distracted with day to day life, but I for one like the idea that there is a little robot on another planet doing its thing and reporting it all back to us.

Drilling is absolutely central to Curiosity’s mission in Gale Crater, the deep equatorial bowl where it landed last August.

The rover is investigating whether past environments at this location could ever have supported life, and getting inside rocks to analyse their chemistry will provide some of the most telling evidence.

Curiosity will likely drill a number of shallow test holes, using the tailings to scrub the metal bit of any contaminants carried from Earth.

Eventually, though, the drill will go deep enough to push rock powder into the drill’s sample-gathering chamber. From there, the powder will be sorted to the correct volume and particle size to go in the robot’s Chemin and Sam labs.

The subsequent analysis will reveal the precise chemical and mineralogical compositions present in the powder, giving scientists clues as to the likely conditions under which the rock formed.

In recent days, the rover has also sent back the images to make another of its popular self-portraits.

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via BBC

  • Orange

    “I guess we can all get a little distracted with day to day life, but I
    for one like the idea that there is a little robot on another planet
    doing its thing and reporting it all back to us.”

    This is a gem

  • GregM

    Yep it’s absolutely fascinating. I am checking the JPL website every few days

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/

  • Lopsy

    All that way and all they can find is Dotcoms bum…

  • Steve (North Shore)

    Drilling? Wait for the Greens to protest

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