Audi parking redux

A few days ago we published a photo of an Audi taking up not one, but two disabled parking spots.  Here it is again, to refresh the memory:

Spotted outside the Bunnings Warehouse in Rongotai on Friday 17th May 2013,

Questioned the lady on a permit and all she said was it was ok because she was dropping off her boy!!

IMG_0441_1

Well, someone didn’t like that lady’s attitude and did some more investigating.

c41e2e59d8cb79ccffff8090ffffd502Persis Jilla owns an Audi A7  GJG432

http://www.osteopathichealth.co.nz/5473.html

Persis Jilla       Osteopath

A graduate of the British School of Osteopathy, London, Persis has worked in General Practices in the UK and Switzerland. She has specific expertise working with babies and children as well as pregnancy and post natal related health issues. She also offers cranial osteopathy.

Persis is also enjoying the experience of her baby boy, the wide range of Arts in Welington and is a keen cook.

Reading that, you’d expect Persis to be a little more sensitive to the needs of people requiring disabled parking. ¬†So much so, that the act of dropping off her healthy boy shouldn’t really require the use of¬†two disabled parking spots.

Tut tut Persis.

 

  • Sir Cullen’s Sidekick

    I recommend Persis joining the Green party. Suits her style.

  • Shoreboy57

    “A graduate of the British School of Osteopathy” – as if it is some for mof medical school. Peddling mumbo jumbo more like

    • Bad__Cat

      No, actually they turn out excellent osteopaths, I have had my back sorted by more than one.

      • Ronnie Chow

        Should only need one ‘sort’.

  • Pissedoffyouth

    I think your wrong, a well bred woman like that should be commended for only taking 2 spaces. She’s clearly thinking of us plebs

  • Josh Metcalfe

    How long did she stay in the park? If she pulled in let the kid out and was about to leave when questioned, then I don’t have a problem. Any longer than 2 minutes and then maybe this is warranted

    • Timboh

      Really doesn’t matter how long. Disabled driver could look for a space during your two minutes. And then why two? Three would be fairer or what about….

      • Josh Metcalfe

        2 minutes was an arbitrary number that seemed like an appropriate amount of time to give someone to make sure they have everything before leaving the vehicle.

    • Mr_V4

      In reality it would take about 30 seconds to drop someone off, so long as there isn’t a legitimate user waiting for the park, is there any actual harm done?

    • Travis Poulson

      Disabled permit parking only. Not ‘disabled parking only, except for mums with kids, couriers, tradesmen, people with Audi’s, or anyone that is going to be no longer than 2 minutes’.

      Pretty simple to understand really. I don’t find it too hard, but then again I’ve probably got a bit more common sense than your average shit parker.

    • Honcho

      If that was the case, she could have pulled up momentarily by the front door to offload, and then drive off as soon as her dearest had shut the car door. No she stopped in two disabled carparks, and argued with the picture taker over it being alright for her to stop there because she wasn’t going to be long …. which is still wrong.

      • Mr_V4

        I think in many cases “dropping off by the front door” actually blocks the flow of traffic. Pulling out of the traffic flow is a better idea.

    • Shoreboy57

      Why? Ever seen a Bunnings park that is completely full? So what if her darling had to walk a couple of hundred metres.

  • williamabong

    For Sale -Audi A7 near new, drives well, only one slight problem, every time it get driven in town other motorists seem want to spit on it and give the car the finger.

  • Tom

    She’s obviously a very important woman..

    • Travis Poulson

      DO YOU KNOW WHO I AM?!?!

  • Mr_Blobby

    Have rarely meet a so called professional that does not have a stick up there arse.

  • Ronnie Chow

    Looks like she married up .

  • Mediaan

    That’s funny. She is listed somewhere as having a Bachelor’s degree. But the British School of Osteopathy in London doesn’t offer a Bachelor’s degree.

    It only offers a Master’s degree, in Osteopathy, which is conferred through the University of Kent, plus some very basic introduction courses to Osteopathy. See http://www.bso.ac.uk

    Wikipedia explains it thus:

    “The University of Bedfordshire validates the BSO’s M.Ost integrated undergraduate masters degree programme, which may be studied full time (via the BSO’s standard pathway) or via mix of full-time and part-time study (mixed mode pathway).
    The BSO also offers an Access to Higher Education Diploma (Osteopathic Sciences & Health Care) programme. This is a one-year further education course leading to a nationally recognised award. It is designed specifically for students over the age of 18 who wish to become osteopaths or to study a related health care discipline at degree level with little or no academic qualifications beyond GCSE level.
    There is also an Introduction to Osteopathic Sciences course, which is designed for potential M.Ost students who have proven academic achievement but who lack a solid grounding in the sciences.”

    • Young and Dumb

      Are you saying she may not actually have a bachelors degree?

      • Mediaan

        One would need to ask the alleged conferring body. Either the University of Kent or the BSO could tell you.

        Clearly, on the face of it, what she claims to have is not possible. She states on one of her potted bios (see original blog by Whaleoil) that she is “A graduate of the British School of Osteopathy, London”, and she has formally submitted her quals to the Osteopathic Society in NZ as “Bachelors with Honours”, or they wouldn’t list her as such.

        I am saying, it looks fishy.

        Unless the BSO USED to offer a Bachelor’s (with an Honours facility, further) and no longer do so, and she qualified then. That is a possible reason for the strange discrepancy.

        A tertiary body either offers a certain degree, or it doesn’t. If I were her client, I would certainly require a check. A lot of people do lie about their quals.

  • Persis Jilla

    Dear Photographer, you got me fair and square and I am sorry that my car and my parking have given you offence. I was dropping off my toddler in a cold Southerly rain and merely tried to get as close to the entrance as I could; a dash to the door and back. As far as I can tell, no one was inconvenienced by me dashing in and out and of course would have shifted the car, even earlier, if a disabled person had need the space.
    If you have never broken the rules to this extent, when parking your car or stopping off, then you are a better person than I am.

    • Shoreboy57

      Of course, its all about you. Cold and wet in Wellington? – oh FFS, talk about first world problems – And BTW I can say I never have and never will park in a disabled car park, unless of course I had a legitimate permit to do so. I have been with family, with wheelchair, unable to park because of people like you. So happy take the moral high ground anytime on this

    • bobby

      I think the issue is not just that you took up a mobility park, but that you took TWO of them… Someone who needed one would only need to drive by and not be able to park, they have no idea how long you planned to be in the park.

      Kudos at least for taking on-board this as a reminder in this day and age how quickly selfish actions can be made public and how easy it is for people to start throwing eggs.

    • Dave

      In reply, just over 50 years of driving, NO, I have NEVER parked in a disabled park, not even momentarily, yes, I have occasionally double parked, but never around a school, hospital or similar.

    • Bebe Lorett

      Your selfish attitude and sense of entitlement is only further demonstrated by the fact you think it is absolutely acceptable and quite commonplace for people to at like this. Punch kittens in your spare time too?

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