Did Jesus perform his miracles with cannabis oil?

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For those who don’t believe, try not to be mingy commenters…read the information and talk about that rather than debate whether or not there is a god.

Meanwhile there is some evidence that Jesus in the bible may have used cannabis oil as part of his healing.

I’ve blogged about miracle cure for Charlotte Figi, and there are many others experiencing the same with the legalisation of cannabis in some states.

Tales of “miraculous” healing through the use of highly-concentrated cannabis oil have been circulating within the global marijuana community for almost ten years, but they only broke into the popular consciousness this August, when Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent, offered millions of viewers a painful apology for previously dismissing mounting evidence in favor of medical cannabis, describing himself as having been “systematically misled” on the subject.

Then Dr. Gupta introduced the world to six-year-old Charlotte Figi from Colorado Springs, Colorado, who used to suffer 300 gran mal seizures per week, even after cycling through every anti-seizure medicine in the pharmacopeia and enduring a series of painful procedures that left her unable to walk, talk or eat. Those seizures started when Charlotte was just three months old, and yet in all that time, not one medical professional ever so much as mentioned cannabis. Her parents only learned the herb might help treat Dravet’s—the rare, intractable form of epilepsy tormenting their child—by watching a video on Youtube, and even then only decided to try it after all else failed.

The first time they gave their daughter a dose of wholly plant-derived non-psychoactive high-CBD cannabis oil, her seizures ceased for seven straight days—a completely astonishing response. She’s now down from more than 1,200 major seizures per month to just two or three mild ones. Towards the end of the CNN segment, as Charlotte happily pedaled her bicycle, her father asked, “Why were we the ones that had to go out and find this natural cure? How come our doctors didn’t know about this?”  

But did Jesus use cannabis oil to heal. Perhaps, Vice explores:

Now imagine Charlotte Figi living not in modern day Colorado, but in the Middle East, roughly 2000 years ago. Whether an object of pity, scorn, fear, or fascination, that poor young girl likely would’ve been thought to be demonically possessed—her deeply religious community would have had no concept of epilepsy as we know it today. At least until the day a stranger came to town, calling himself Jesus of Nazareth, but named by his disciples as Christ—a Greek word meaning the anointed.

Following the recipe for holy anointing oil found in the Old Testament (Exodus 30: 22-23), this healer of local renown would infuse nine pounds of a plant known in Aramaic as kaneh-bosm(fragrant cane) into about six quarts of olive oil, along with essential extracts of myrrh, cinnamon, and cassia. He would then apply this unguent concoction topically to the infirm, allowing it to absorb transdermally.

According to conventional Biblical scholarship, the “250 shekels of kaneh-bosm” listed in ancient Hebrew versions of the Old Testament supposedly refers to calamus, but Chris Bennett, author of the 2001 book Sex, Drugs, and Violence in the Bible claims that this is a misconception, and likely a misdirection as well, one stemming from a perhaps willful mistake made the first time the Old Testament was translated into Greek.

Kaneh-bosm, he writes, was cannabis.

The first solid evidence of the Hebrew use of cannabis was established in 1936 by Sula Benet, a little known Polish etymologist from the Institute of Anthropological Sciences in Warsaw. The word cannabis was generally thought to be of Scythian origin, but Benet showed that it has a much earlier origin in Semitic languages like Hebrew, and that it appears several times throughout the Old Testament. Benet explained that “in the original Hebrew text of the Old Testament there are references to hemp, both as incense, which was an integral part of religious celebration, and as an intoxicant.”

Benet demonstrated that the word for cannabis is kaneh-bosm, also rendered in traditional Hebrew as kaneh or kannabus. The root kan in this construction means “reed” or “hemp”, while bosm means “aromatic”. This word appears five times in the Old Testament; in the books of Exodus, the Song of Songs, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel…. and has been mistranslated as calamus, a common marsh plant with little monetary value that does not have the qualities or value ascribed to kaneh-bosm. The error occurred in the oldest Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, the Septuagint in the third century BC, and was repeated in the many translations that followed.

Now that is fascinating. Was Moses up with the play on cannabis? …it seems so.

Kaneh-bosm makes its first, rather auspicious appearance in the Bible as part of the story of Moses and the burning bush, when the revered Jewish prophet gets the holy anointing oil recipe direct from the Lord, along with clear instructions to anoint only the priest class—a restriction later eased to allow kings access as well.

Exodus 30:31

You shall speak to the sons of Israel, saying, “This shall be a holy anointing oil to me throughout your generations. It shall not be poured on anyone’s body, nor shall you make any like it in the same proportions; it is holy, and it shall be holy to you. Whoever shall mix any like it or whoever puts any of it on a layman shall be cut off from his people.

Unfortunately for the priests and their erstwhile marijuana monopoly, however, many other competing religions and spiritual paths active at the time—including pagans and those who worshipped the Goddess Ashera—had their own far more free-flowing kaneh-bosm supply. Cannabis, after all, has been grown as a food crop since at least 6,000 BC and was well known and widely available in Moses’s time.

“There can be little doubt about a role for cannabis in Judaic religion,” according to Carl P. Ruck,  a professor of classical mythology at Boston University who studies the way psychoactive substances have influenced humanity’s spiritual development.

And now to Jesus:

But if water served as the catalyst for Jesus’s spiritual ascension, why does he never perform a baptism? Why take the name Christ? And why anoint his flock in oil before sending them out to anoint others, as described in Mark 6:13They cast out many devils, and anointed with oil many that were sick and healed them.

To those who believe that Christ used cannabis oil, the answer lies in non-canonical Christian texts. The canonical texts of the New Testament, that is the books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, etc, were not selected as such until around 325 years after Jesus’s death, when the Roman Catholic Church culled them from a large number of contenders in hopes of uniting all of Christendom under one banner—their own. The Church then sought out and destroyed every account that differed from their now official version of events. Allowing the very empire Jesus once virulently opposed to seize control over the practice of Christianity for a thousand year period known as the Dark Ages. …

[U]ntil 1945, when an Egyptian peasant digging for fertilizer in a cave unearthed a dozen leather-bound codices inside a sealed jar, a treasure trove purposely buried there by scribes at a nearby monastery sometime around AD 367, when the Church first condemned the use of non-canonical texts.

Within these volumes—many of which predate the books of the New Testament—Biblical experts discovered a parallel but radically different telling of the life of Jesus, one that places the anointing ceremony squarely at the center of Christianity. So much so that these various sects were given the blanket name Gnostics (from the Greek word for “knowledge”) to highlight their shared focus on first-hand experience of the holy oil as what defines a christian, rather than second-hand faith in scripture or the priesthood.

The Gnostic tractate The Gospel of Phillip, for instance, proclaims that any person who “receives this unction…is no longer a christian but a Christ.” A transformation then compared  to the placebo act of baptism adopted by the Roman Catholic Church, in which would-be initiates “go down into the water and come up without having received anything… [Because] there is water in water, there is fire in chrism [an anointing].”

Basically, the Gnostics believed Jesus’s baptism took place, but only as a kind of cleansing ritual, in preparation for receiving holy anointing oil—the true sacrament. As Chris Bennett writes, “The surviving Gnostic descriptions of the effects of the anointing rite make it very clear that the holy oil had intense psychoactive properties that prepared the recipient for entrance into ‘unfading bliss.’”

Interesting…but proof?

Understandably, for children like Charlotte Figi and their families, religion, history, politics, medicine, and the law all must take a backseat to the positive effects they are experiencing treating illness with marijuana. As Jesus said to his apostles after preaching at Lake Galilee:

Mark 4: 21-23

Do you bring in a lamp to put it under a bowl or a bed? Instead, don’t you put it on its stand? For whatever is hidden is meant to be disclosed, and whatever is concealed is meant to be brought out into the open. If anyone has ears to hear, let them hear.

Remember, lamps back then were fueled with oil.

  • OrphanIsland

    Interesting, I’d have to say nothing much has changed since those priests engineered Christ so they could bleed him dry and eat his flesh…

    • Night Stick

      Wonder if Mohammed was on some stuff also, marrying a 9 year old girl.

      • OrphanIsland

        They don’t need anything to help justify their own narcissistic delusions.

  • Night Stick

    This can be Len’s latest channel.

    ‘Do ya ever seem to have one of those days where everyone’s on your case
    from your teacher all the way down from well to your best girlfriend?
    Well you I use to have those about all the time. But I found a way to
    get out of it
    Let me tell ya ’bout …

    Smokin’ in the Ngati room
    Smokin’ in the Ngati room
    Teacher don’t you fill me up with your rule
    Everybody knows that smokin’ ain’t allowed in the Ngati room.

  • unitedtribes

    So God wasn’t a socialist then

    • OrphanIsland

      Not according to Moses anyway …

  • Rodger T

    Whatever he was on,the sooner they make legal the better.

    • Rodger T

      : )

  • OrphanIsland

    Jeez , if the Doggs of NZ read this, they’ll be stomping around calling themselves Jesus.

    They have to change their name from Head Hunter to
    Moses’ MC

    • steve and monique

      They( gangs) have tossed in the weed for meth now. As for Jesus, it explains why they think he could walk on water. Stoned the lot of them, and not in the literal sense.

      • Polish Pride

        Ralpie May Smoking Weed with Jesus. Awesome :)!

  • blokeintakapuna

    That is a superb article. Thank you.

    Easy to see how “translations” get confused by human error or deliberate actions. Imagine of one of those early translators were of the Labour bent, attempting to re-frame a narrative to their own ends?

    It’s about bloody time though, that legislation caught up with scientific knowledge and observed reality!

  • justin

    Whale it is boring that you keep on banging on about *wonderful* dope. But you’re really stretching things too much. I really think that your posting of this rubbish proves beyond any doubt that dope numbs good sense.

    • Chancey

      or that your programming has been successful

      • justin

        I’m very conflicted. Legalisation will take the power away from the mongrel mob… but looks like the Catholic church will jump in to fill the vacuum. Damn my prior programming.

        • Chancey

          a lot of medical; marijuana is non psychoactive

    • Cowgirl

      While I myself don’t partake, I do appreciate the economic sense it would make to NZ to decriminalise the stuff, and also that it is a good natural remedy for a lot of ailments, and I don’t see how that can be a bad thing.
      I don’t understand why we can have synthetic rubbish, but not the real McCoy – it’s a natural product, designed to be used for a variety of purposes. Let’s use it.

    • http://www.whaleoil.co.nz/ Whaleoil

      I’ll bang on about whatever I feel like, but like with the marriage equality debate I prefer to lead and set the agenda rather than follow and join in the back slapping.

      The law will change it is inevitable…I am simply showing people the inevitability of it. Once more states legalise then the barriers fall away. it will happen and inside 10 years.

      • justin

        You’re looking a bit needy “Jesus was a dope healer” and all. 10 years is radical talk. Dope is the recreational drug of choice, legalization will adversely effect many many kiwis.

        • Chancey

          hopefully it will discourage the sale of unknown toxic pharmaceuticals at the lolly shop – whats so hard about criminalizing that? They are playing with semantics over very necessary banning of the synthetics to our children

        • Ronnie Chow

          “legalization will adversely effect many many kiwis.”

          The ones who smoke now ?

      • Kimbo

        I also think the law change is inevitable – and probably necessary.

        Nevertheless as per justin, and my tl;dr efforts below, an appeal to the practice of Jesus and his disciples does not constitute reliable (to quote you) “evidence”.

        Just saying…

    • Polish Pride

      What is boring Justin is your failure to look at both sides of the debate with an open mind and your failure to even answer the most simple question of whether or not you drink or have ever drunk alcohol which is far more dangerous and detrimental to society than cannabis is.
      This will now be the fifth time I have asked. Do you Justin Drink or have you ever drunk Alcohol?
      Please take some time and actually research the subject.
      I was once in your camp. I was dead against all forms of drugs including cannabis. Then I actually researched it and basically found out that we have been lied to.
      Cannabis – one of the safest substances on the planet if used with respect and not abused. And far safer than our legal drugs Alcohol, Tobbacco and Caffiene.
      Far safer than most prescription drugs also.

  • blairmulholland

    This may well be one of the more stupid things I have ever read in my life. Firstly, whether cannabis is in the Bible or not, it is ridiculous to cite Gnostic texts as more accurate than the accepted Gospels. It would be like accepting the Oliver Stone movie JFK as being more accurate than the Warren Commission report.

    Secondly, there was no such thing as the “Roman” Catholic Church in the 4th Century. The Roman church only defined the canon in the 16th Century at the Council of Trent. At the time there was the Catholic Church, and the Church as a whole never defined the Biblical canon. It was never forced on the Church by anyone – that would have been impossible, since the Roman Empire was not only divided into two at this time, but there were also churches outside the Empire at this point – notably the Armenian and Ethiopian churches. While the Ethiopian church to this day holds to a slightly expanded canon from that accepted by other churches, no Gnostic or heretical books are a part of it. There was no enforcing of a Biblical canon, because no temporal ruler had that power, and no temporal ruler even sought it until the rise of the Franks in the 9th Century.

    Thirdly, there is nothing radical about anointing with oil – the Orthodox Church still does it. It’s called Chrismation, and is the seal of the gift of the Holy Spirit following Baptism. Both sacraments are of equal importance. In fact, the words Christ, Chrismation, and charisma all come from the Greek word for anointing with oil. These days olive oil was used, but who knows? Maybe they did use cannabis oil at one point? But to stretch that and attribute miracles to Jesus because of the oil is just far fetched. If you are going to believe Jesus rose from the dead, at least allow the possibility that He could use divine power to heal others!

  • Sunshine

    I went to the first public debate on cannabis in the Auckland Town Hall in the 1980′s and nothing has changed since then apart from more criminal behaviour and so I’m told, the strength of the stuff.
    I would like to see medical and practical use of cannabis legalised but our youth still need to be protected from any legalisation of psychoactive substances- I believed that both can be achieved.

    • justin

      But the pot heads want to have recreational use sneak in under a “medical” umbrella.

      • Sunshine

        Medicinal use would need to be tightly regulated just the same as any drug such as narcotics.

        • Polish Pride

          Yet it is far safer than Alcohol

        • Ronnie Chow

          Narcotics use is not regulated .

          • Sunshine

            No narcotics are illegal, but what I meant was that medicinal use of narcotic derivatives such as morphine etc are regulated.

  • Bunswalla

    If you’re arguing that overall, cannabis is less harmful than other legalised drugs (tobacco and alcohol to name two), I agree with you.

    If you’re arguing that cannabis oil, in particular the type (with low THC) that has proven astonishingly helpful to Charlotte Figi and others, has many beneficial medicinal properties, I agree with you.

    If you’re arguing that continuing to criminalise users that wish to grow and consume cannabis in the privacy of their own home, or use it responsibly with others, in an attempt to stamp out its use is pointless, futile and doomed to fail, I agree with you.

    But when you use terms like “miracles” and “miraculous healing” and then ask those of us that don’t believe in god(s) to not mention that fact, I can’t agree with you. The cures for Charlotte Figi and others are chemical in nature, not miraculous. There are no miracles. People have known for centuries, if not millennia, that cannabis and hemp and its many derivatives are useful for treating all sorts of complaints, often with astonishing success. There’s nothing miraculous about any of this, it’s simple science.

    • blokeintakapuna

      We’ll said.

  • Kimbo

    Ho, hum. So much poor scholarship, so many targets, just like the da Vinci code.

    Main problem here – the argument is like a chain, with interlocking links. Show just one of the links is invalid, and the whole argument pretty much fails. There is not just one ‘link’ wrong here, but lots: -

    “a stranger came to town, calling himself Jesus of Nazareth, but named by his disciples as Christ—a Greek word meaning the anointed.”

    Wrong! The consistent theme of the three Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, & Luke) is that Jesus kept his Messiahship (Hebrew: Anointed, such as a prophet, priest or king) quiet, most likely because the title would attract ‘fair-weather’ followers, and it had too many political overtones that interfered the with immediate spiritual needs of his ministry, e.g., Mark 8:27-30

    “27 Jesus and his disciples went on to the villages around Caesarea Philippi. On the way he asked them, “Who do people say I am?”

    28 They replied, “Some say John the Baptist; others say Elijah; and still others, one of the prophets.”

    29 “But what about you?” he asked. “Who do you say I am?”

    Peter answered, “You are the Messiah.”

    30 Jesus warned them not to tell anyone about him”.

    • Kimbo

      next link in the chain that is tenuous: -

      “Following the recipe for holy anointing oil found in the Old Testament…”

      But as per above, the Messiahship/Anonting of Jesus was not a literal act performed by or on Jesus – with one exception.

      Anonting with oil was a common medical practice ion the ancient world, which also included the use of honey as an antibiotic. You don’t have to go running to a specific recipe in the Old Testament (which in context is non-medicinal) to verify the use of anointing with oils (most obviously olive oil).

      But the problem with linking that with the ministry of Jesus is that there is NO record of him or his disciples using or being anointed with oils, except for one occasion – and the a pssage above points out HOW it would be used.
      Straight after the testimony of Peter that the 12 disciples are indeed followers of the Messiah/Christ/Anointed we have Jesus saying: -

      “31 He then began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and after three days rise again.

      32 He spoke plainly about this, and Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him.

      33 But when Jesus turned and looked at his disciples, he rebuked Peter. “Get behind me, Satan!” he said. “You do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns…”

      which points the way to Mark 14:1-3 and the fulfillment of Jesus’ ministry, which the other Gospels make clear is a prefiguring of the anointing oil applied in death, not healing, which Jesus would suffer just a few days later….

      “1 Now the Passover and the Festival of Unleavened Bread were only two days away, and the chief priests and the teachers of the law were scheming to arrest Jesus secretly and kill him.

      2 “But not during the festival,” they said, “or the people may riot.”

      3 While he was in Bethany,reclining at the table in the home of Simon the Leper, a woman came with an alabaster jar of very expensive perfume, made of pure nard. She broke the jar and poured the perfume on his head…”

      • Kimbo

        BUT even if Jesus was openly known as the Anointed One/Messiah/Christ during his ministry (which he wasn’t!),…

        and he and his disciples went around healing with anointing oil (which they didn’t!),…

        which wouldn’t have been distinctive anyway (because it as a standard medical practice!)

        and even IF out of the hundreds of potential anointing concoctions available at the time they used that details on Exodus 30, there is still no proof that they used cannabis.

        That is because the following supposed scholarship over looks the weakness of using etymology to determine the meaning of a word.

        “The first solid evidence of the Hebrew use of cannabis was established in 1936 by Sula Benet, a little known Polish etymologist from the Institute of Anthropological Sciences in Warsaw.

        The word cannabis was generally thought to be of Scythian origin, but Benet showed that it has a much earlier origin in Semitic languages like Hebrew, and that it appears several times throughout the Old Testament. Benet explained that “in the original Hebrew text of the Old Testament there are references to hemp, both as incense, which was an integral part of religious celebration, and as an intoxicant.”

        Benet demonstrated that the word for cannabis is kaneh-bosm, also rendered in traditional Hebrew as kaneh or kannabus. The root kan in this construction means “reed” or “hemp”, while bosm means “aromatic”. This word appears five times in the Old Testament; in the
        books of Exodus, the Song of Songs, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel…. and has been mistranslated as calamus, a common marsh plant with little monetary value that does not have the qualities or value ascribed to kaneh-bosm. The error occurred in the oldest Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, the Septuagint in the third century BC, and was repeated in the many translations that followed”.

        The problem here is far too much reliance on etymology. Phrases such as “the first solid evidence “, confirms the pudding is being over-egged.

        Etymology is a useful tool that can add some value, but ultimately it is the lingusitic context of the time of Jesus, not the alleged Scythian origin of a word that had been picked up in Hebrew, then translated into Greek that determines the meaning of what Jesus understood by Anointing.

        For example, our word ‘injury’ points to the fact that if you once caused
        physical harm to someone, you could end up facing court action, and the
        matter would be decided ‘in-jury’. BUT it is not a reliable guide as to what an injury means now, i.e., a physical impairment caused by an accident or deliberate act. Same with whatever the Scythians allegedly understood the word to mean…

        • Kimbo

          but even the tenuous link of etymology is not as weak as the next one – appeal to non-canonical sources. And not just any non-canonical sources, but…

          “To those who believe that Christ used cannabis oil, the answer lies in non-canonical Christian texts…[U]ntil 1945, when an Egyptian peasant digging for fertilizer in a cave unearthed a dozen leather-bound codices…”

          Ho hum. They are appealing to the Gnostic Nag Hammadi writings, which were rejected for a reason – NOT because of any alleged drug use, but because the theology didn’t stack up with orthodox Christian belief…

          • Kimbo

            BUT even if you did consider that the theology found in the Nag Hammadi documents was an accurate reflection of the beliefs and practices of Jesus and his disciples….

            there is no proof within them that they used cannabis.

            Don’t believe me?

            Look again at the supposed ‘proof’ : -

            “But if water served as the catalyst for Jesus’ spiritual
            ascension, why does he never perform a baptism? Why take the name Christ? And why anoint his flock in oil before sending them out to anoint others, as described in Mark 6:13: They cast out many devils, and anointed with oil many that were sick and healed them.

            To those who believe that Christ used cannabis oil, the answer lies…”

            STOP!!

            The reason is because he is considered the King of Israel seated at the right hand of God, designated to rule the world as Yahweh’s instrument as per Psalm 2

            Psalm 2

            1 Why do the nations conspire
            and the peoples plot in vain?

            2 The kings of the earth rise up
            and the rulers band together
            against the Lord and against his anointed, saying,

            3 “Let us break their chains
            and throw off their shackles.”

            4 The One enthroned in heaven laughs;
            the Lord scoffs at them.

            5 He rebukes them in his anger
            and terrifies them in his wrath, saying,

            6 “I have installed my king
            on Zion, my holy mountain.”

            7 I will proclaim the Lord’s decree:

            He said to me, “You are my son;
            today I have become your father.

            8 Ask me, and I will make the nations your inheritance,
            the ends of the earth your possession.

            9 You will break them with a rod of iron
            you will dash them to pieces like pottery.”

            10 Therefore, you kings, be wise;
            be warned, you rulers of the earth.

            11 Serve the Lord with fear
            and celebrate his rule with trembling.

            12 Kiss his son, or he will be angry
            and your way will lead to your destruction,
            for his wrath can flare up in a moment.
            Blessed are all who take refuge in him.

          • Kimbo

            BUT even IF Messiahship/Christ/Anointed DIDN’T refer to the obvious and open theology of the New Testament that Jesus was King of Israel, ruler of the world, and also Son of God,…

            the alleged Nag Hammadi link still doesn’t prove that even the heretic Gnostics who wrote it used cannabis.

            Don’t believe me?

            Look again at the quote.

            “Within these volumes—many of which predate the books of the New Testament (HAH! contentious and highly unlikely speculation, NOT fact) —Biblical experts discovered a parallel but radically different telling of the life of Jesus, one that places the anointing ceremony squarely at the center of Christianity. …Basically, the Gnostics believed Jesus’ baptism took place, but only as a kind of cleansing ritual, in preparation for receiving holy anointing oil—the true sacrament. As Chris Bennett writes, “The surviving Gnostic descriptions of the effects of the anointing rite make it very clear that the holy oil had intense psychoactive properties that prepared the recipient for entrance into ‘unfading bliss.’”

            Of course it was an intensely moving act – they believed they were being raised up to commune with God through it! The belief in the effect of the act would have been sufficient WITHOUT any cannabis being used. would have.

            Note I’m not trying to defend the Gnsotics’ belief of practice, just simply stating there is no logical link here to prove they used cannabis. Yet another incredibly weak link, as is the last one which is truly risible…

          • Kimbo

            “Understandably, for children like Charlotte Figi and
            their families, religion, history, politics, medicine, and the law all must take a backseat to the positive effects they are experiencing treating illness with marijuana. As Jesus said to his apostles after preaching at Lake Galilee:

            Mark 4: 21-23

            Do you bring in a lamp to put it under a bowl or a bed? Instead, don’t you put it on its stand? For whatever is hidden is meant to be disclosed, and whatever is concealed is meant to be brought out into the open. If anyone has ears to hear, let them hear.

            Remember, lamps back then were fueled with oil”.

            HAH! So much for the pseudo-scholarly search via etymology and archaeological sources such as Nag Hammadi. When it suits the argument, let’s just go quoting a text out of context.

            The passage quoted is a parable, a story where Jesus uses common elements from everyday life (in this case the source of lighting in a non-electric age) to show the affect of his message of the coming kingdom of God, i.e., the gospel. It brings light, and it also judges thoughts, words and deeds.

            As with other parables the ELEMENTS of the story are simply that – elements chosen from everyday life that are insignificant in and of themselves. But in the context of Jesus’ ministry, the story points the way to a deeper spriitual proof. Hence the advice “If anyone has ears to hear, let them hear”.

          • Kimbo

            So to summarise, this argument is a chain, which falls apart if any of the following highly tenuous links are not fact:

            Jesus was openly proclaimed as Messiah during his earthly ministry (the Gospels tell otherwise)

            Jesus and his disciples used anointing oil to heal (there is no record they did)

            Even if they did use anointing oil, it would somehow have marked them out as different from a standard medical practice of the day.

            Even if the did use anointing oil, it wouldn’t have been a local recipe but that taken from Exodus 30

            Even if it was taken from Exodus 30, it is only a tenuous appeal to alleged etymology, and not actual 1st century Palestinian practice that allegedly makes the connection to the use of cannabis.

            The only pieces of corroborating proof don’t come from our primary source of knowledge of Jesus and his disciples, the New Testament, but

            from a non-canonical source

            that was rejected as heresy

            which even then, while it describes anointing as an intensely psychological experience (hardly surprising given the beliefs involved), provides no substantial proof that cannabis was involved

            and when all else fails, let’s go running to a parable of the New Testament that quotes the use of oil – an element as common as bread, water, milk, meat, fruit, wine, houses, farms, barns, roads, clouds, soldiers, etc, all of which Jesus readily uses in his parables.

            If you believe this, congratulations. I realise some among you thing that Christians are foolish idiots, who belief in an imaginaru sky fairy. Maybe we do.

            Nonetheless, if you believe this stuff, I sure admire your faith, because you truly have the capacity to believe in anything in spite of the facts.

            Just saying…

          • Rodger T

            The question was ,did JC perform his miracles with cannabis oil?
            A simple yes or no would have sufficed.

            : )

          • Kimbo

            In the world of the dogmatic, maybe Rodger T.

            Nevertheless, the post invited us, “For those who don’t believe, try not to be mingy commenters…read the
            information and talk about that rather than debate whether or not there
            is a god”.

            …which to my way of think means you consider, then state the reason for your conclusions, rather than a simple, “yeah” or “nah”.

            Or is that not “debate”?

          • Rodger T

            Yeah…nah
            I was just yanking ur chain,could`nt help meself. : )

          • Kimbo

            Fair enough – you found me at a moment when I was short of humour and was maybe taking myself too seriously.

          • Ronnie Chow

            So , after all , Kimbo , scholarship and all that , you are still taking what other men wrote as gospel . What if it was just as political back then as it is now ?

          • Kimbo

            I have little doubt that it was.

            However, a classical view of Scripture is that, unlike what Muslims claim about the Koran, the Bible did not just “fall out of heaven”, nor was it primarily given in the form of dictation. .

            Instead, like Christ himself, the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament are fully divine, AND fully human – which includes the politics which shaped the perspectives and motives of the writers and/or editors/redactors.

            II Peter 1:20-21: -

            “20 Above all, you must understand that no prophecy of Scripture came about by the prophet’s own interpretation of things. 21 For prophecy never had its origin in the human will, but prophets, though human, spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit.”

            Sorry Zen-master, Chow. The scholarship kicks in automatically. I don’t make the rules, I just report them…

          • Ronnie Chow

            “For prophecy never had its origin in the human will, but prophets, though human, spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit.”

            Has anything , at all , written since then , been divine , or the word of God through man ?.

          • Kimbo

            The classical answer of Christian theology, which I think accurately reflects New Testament orthodoxy would be “no”.

            So as Muhammed, Joseph Smith, and various self-styled prophets come later than the completion of both the Old and New Testaments, you are free to disregard…

  • 2bluemoons

    Dr. Sanjay Gupta, reminds me of Saul who had a total change of thought and heart about Jesus and turned into Paul.on the road to Damascus.
    The abusers and ignorant of the healing powers of cannabis will not stop the eventual decriminalisation of cannabis.

    When are people going to ask the hard questions about cannabis vs alcohol?
    about alcohol being legal, ruining and affecting the world population every day
    When will the people see that the wealthy and the ignorant lead the masses by the nose by the very fact that cannabis being illegal makes a lot of people very rich ie the paper pulp vs hemp story is just one.
    Cannabis has proven to be healing but it is like prozac not everybody has a good trip using it.

  • thor42

    I agree with the post. It’s certainly possible.

  • meow

    No, the mythical fantasy storybook character called ‘Jesus’ didn’t use cannabis derivatives in real life.
    Although that won’t stop dodgy priests now using that as a justification to anoint altar boys with it.

  • Rick H

    Explains why he was willing to spend 40 days alone in the desert – -high as a kite .LOL

  • Rick H

    No wonder he was hungry enough to eat locusts.

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