Weapons-grade whining from the left of politics, especially the Media party

Another stellar National private members bill is drawn:  The Companies (Annual Report Notice Requirements) Amendment Bill by Matt Doocey

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You can read about it here, and the the bill itself is here.

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And for those of you confused…. Vernon Small is a list MP for the Media party.

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Mind you, Vernon is backed up by one of his other Media MP colleagues with a solid argument.

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The Media party.  They’ve got your back.

 

 

  • shykiwibloke

    If mr Small is so concerned about quality and time wasting he should look closer to home. The MSM product seems over bloated with poorly drafted and time wasting articles

  • Geordie

    Considering the Government normally has a full agenda of legislation, this is often the easiest way of getting these small changes through. looks like a very good change. The Greens should be happy that companies are wasting forests to print annual reports, which mainly end up in the bin with their wrapping still on.

    If you want to see time wasting, look at all the opposition members bills which are normally directly opposed to the Government’s position, and then they wail when the bill is voted down at the first reading. No where is it stated that private members bills have to be exciting, decisive and life changing events, governing is all about doing the small stuff well.

    • biscuit barrel

      Heard of the annual Statutes Amendment Bill?
      Heres the latest one
      “The aim of this Bill is to amend various statutes.”

      They are all mostly minor changes to clauses of existing legislation that are fix ups
      http://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-digests/document/51PLLaw23711/statutes-amendment-bill-2015-2016-no-71-2-bills-digest

      Its quite crazy in that its likely the Government MP was given this ‘private bill’ on a plate and would have never heard of it before then.

      • Geordie

        Seems like pretty good changes. The problem you are ignoring is, it is difficult for a Government to make these small changes, they are normally part of a major overhaul of a piece of legislation. Why shouldn’t the Government use private members bills to get these done, quick and efficient, sounds like good Government.

        Unlike Little’s warm homes bill which is going through select committee at the moment. Lazy legislation which is only about headlines. No details on how to achieve the outcome, which department would enforce the new law, time limits for remedial work, no thought given to the different needs of houses in the deep south compared to Northland…………………………… Talk about wasting time!

        • biscuit barrel

          No . Thats was my point, the statutes amendment Bill was for this sort of mixed very small changes. Its even better they are combined together, as time efficency is maximised. Same reason shopping at supermarket involves a large number of items

  • Sally

    A great way to save some time, tick all the boxes, have no debate and move on to the next one.

  • ex-JAFA

    As someone who was involved with lobbying to have the previous law changed approx. 10 years ago so that companies need not automatically send hard copy of reports to all shareholders, I was surprised to learn that they must still proactively ask shareholders if they want a hard copy.

    As far as I’m concerned, this is a great Bill, and presumably isn’t of the type that can be rolled into a statutes amendment or similar tidying-up Bill. Just debate it (not that I think there’s much to debate) and pass it, then get on with some real government.

  • jimknowsall

    The effrontery of these opposition MPs and media party twerps who complain at Bills is astonishing. It’s not up to you to decide which laws are “important”. If you want to effect your own policies, get your party elected and there will be plenty of parliamentary time allocated to government backed bills. Private members bills are generally for small stuff, cross party stuff and novel ideas, not massive political reform.

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