Face of the day

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., and U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, right, meet with fourth-graders at Sophie B. Wright Charter School in New Orleans, Friday, March 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Cheryl Gerber)

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., and U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, right, meet with fourth-graders at Sophie B. Wright Charter School in New Orleans, Friday, March 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Cheryl Gerber)

Former U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan is today’s face of the day for this gem.

Yet I absolutely reject the idea that poverty is destiny in the classroom and the self-defeating belief that schools don’t matter much in the face of poverty.

Sadly, much of the current debate in Washington, in education schools, and in the blogosphere about high-performing charter schools is driven by ideology, not by facts on the ground. Far too often, the chief beneficiaries of high-performing charter schools—low-income families and children—are forgotten amid controversies over funding and the hiring of nonunion teachers in charter schools. Too often, the parents and children who are desperately seeking better schools are an afterthought.

-theatlantic.com

  • Cadwallader

    I heard Mike Hosking speaking with the Teachers’ Union head “negotiator” (read:demander!) this morning. There was nothing of a substantive nature in her objections. It was essentially a recitation that the unions don’t like the government’s policies therefore the policies must be wrong. I have long regarded the unions to be instruments of crass ignorance and brutality but after today’s whining from this woman I would add arrogance to the mix. Unions are becoming anachronistic and pointless without the saving grace of being quaint. The Face of the Day nails it as to how readily children are forgotten about in the hysterical demanding of further monies.

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