Bob Jones on Matthew Hooton

Matthew Hooton is the latest person to draw the ire of national treasure Bob Jones.

After explaining some travesties of reporting against him by various media outlets he then sets about excoriating Matthew Hooton.

Despite my comments, I love newspapers and specially the Dom. But I give it maybe five more years due to the short-sighted Fairfax cost-cutting destroying all their publications. The latest newspaper circulation figures show it suffered a disastrous 14.4% drop in sales last year. Every newspaper is experiencing steady drops but none as bad as that.  Staff lay-offs have become a regular feature of late. These sackees are being mopped up by the Weather Office where their creativity has proven a boon to the forecasting department. The sole New Zealand exception is The National Business Review, which alone deservedly enjoyed a growth in sales.

Still, when it comes to fiction-writing, nothing surpasses NBR’sMatthew Hooton’s July effort headed “Bob Jones’ right-hand man set to save Labour.” Over a full page it described how Greg Loveridge was to be the next Labour leader. Apparently he was about to abandon his $9 million Auckland home and recently acquired $3.5 million Waiheke week-ender and shift to Wainuiomata for God’s sake, to pursue Trevor Mallard’s seat, as a first step to taking over the Labour leadership. Hooton backed all of this with an extraordinary NBR radio interview in which he outlined this virtually as a fait-accompli.   Read more »

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Hooton on Little’s rejection of the centre ground

Matthew Hooton writes at NBR:

No one will ever accuse Andrew Little of being boring after his bold rejection this week of the political centre.

The one political concept almost everyone grasps is the traditional left-right spectrum. People understand that the right tends to want lower taxes and spending and the left wants to raise them; the right likes exams and the left school counsellors; the right is more supportive of globalisation and the left more interested in protecting particular jobs; the right is more likely to support a US military adventure while the left defers to the UN; the right wants to lock up criminals while the left prefers restorative justice.

These are all generalisations, of course but you can’t do political analysis, economics or any social science without generalising.

Moreover, people continue to be happy defining themselves broadly on the spectrum.  When asked in 2014 by pollsters UMR, 30% of New Zealanders roughly identified as left, a quarter as right and 42% as in the middle. That the largest group lies in the centre is why John Key, like Helen Clark before him, has trained his ministers to parrot in public “we think we’ve got the balance about right.”

More sophisticated models of political values have been developed but the traditional left-right spectrum continues to do its job.    Read more »

Dancing on the head of a legal pin

Colin Craig’s lawyer, Stephen Mills QC, says they will appeal on the basis that the jury did not consider the argument of qualified privilege.

That is simply dancing on the head of a legal pin.

Here is the problem. The jury was given what is called a Question Trail. That is a trail of questions they need to answer in a logical manner to step them through the legal complexity of defamation law. The judge spent two hours summing up and directing the jury on how to use this Question trail to come to their decisions.

The Question Trail was drafted by Craig’s lawyer, then approved by Jordan’s lawyer and then finally by the Judge. Mills drafted the Question Trail to start with the defence of Qualified Privilege, then move to truth when that failed and then to honest opinion after that.

The Question Trail contained 14 questions, and there were two counts, so the jury had to step through 28 questions and write up their reasoning beside each one and hand that to the judge after the verdict was given.

The first few questions stepped through qualified privilege. They would not have been required to step through any more questions if the jury had considered qualified privilege and decided it applied. They clearly passed through those questions after quite some time…they deliberated for 10 hours.   Read more »

More like it from a Labour man

Bookmaker and former Labour candidate Kieran McAnulty nabbed a crook, who was trying to steal his ute.

A man has who has tackled for the parliamentary rugby team used this handy life skill to take down a would-be car thief.

Former Labour Party candidate for Wairarapa Kieran McAnulty caught a thief red-handed when he returned to his beloved old red Mazda ute on his lunch break in Masterton on Tuesday.

A man was sitting in the driver’s seat of the car trying to jemmy the ignition when he was rudely interrupted by the car’s owner who opened the door and had a few choice words for his unwanted guest.

Following a brief scuffle, McAnulty bolted after the man and tackled him in the middle of a busy central Masterton street.    Read more »

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Face of the Day

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It’s a win, but it wasn’t pretty.  Not sure if it proved anything other than the event organisers figuring out how to make a lot of money.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

wraith (noun) – 1. An apparition of someone that is believed to appear as a portent just before that person’s death.
2. The ghost of a dead person.
3. Something faint or insubstantial.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1510s, “ghost,” Scottish, of uncertain origin. Weekley and Century Dictionary suggest Old Norse vorðr “guardian” in the sense of “guardian angel.” Klein points to Gaelic and Irish arrach “spectre, apparition.”

Daily Proverb

Proverbs 31

4It is not for kings, O Lemuel, to guzzle wine. Rulers should not crave alcohol.