Mrs Cunliffe does a Mea Culpa, and will now have a short break

…which is code for “going down into the media-proof bunker”

via Newstalk ZB

via Newstalk ZB

And this would be the person that co-aspired to be a Prime Minister’s wife?

Good judgement is not something abundant in the Cunliffe household.

Lying also is a standard fall-back mechanism:

Twitter users said Mr Cunliffe was one of only seven followers the account had over the weekend.

“Interesting he knew nothing about a 3 day old account when he was one of only 7 followers…..,” one posted this morning.

What an omnishables.

With friends like TarnBabe67, what’s Mr TarnBabe67 to do?

Good governance and the Labour Party – an oxymoron or a chance for their future

A guest post by Frances Denz.


 

Good Governance practice was initially developed in 1844 by Erskine May for the British Parliament and a bit later  in 1874 was adapted by Roberts in the US for their Government structures.  Since then “Roberts Rules” have become the model for governance both of parliamentary systems and for businesses.  These rules have been adapted over time by the Foundation formed by Roberts supporters.

A key rule of governance is who do the directors represent?  They represent the business or organisation.  Their job, as stewards, is to ensure that the organisation is governed for its own good.  Not for the shareholders, other stakeholders or the community as a whole.

Now this is really interesting in the governance of political parties and of Parliament themselves.

The Prime Minister and his Cabinet have stewardship over the whole country.  Not the Party: not sector interests: not their mates.  A political party has stewardship over the Party as a whole, not the country.  So where does that leave the Opposition? I submit that they are responsible to the country, as is the Governing party.  But the problem with the Labour Party is that their method of nominating their leader is by the sector interests having a vote – for their own interests.  And the Leader has been, by default, the Leader of the Party as well as the Leader  of the Political wing.  Two different roles. (and then you have the Leader of the House, just to complicate matters!)    Read more »

CDC confirms 1st case of Ebola in USA

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Here it comes…

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Tagged:

Cunliffe’s wife writes new chapter for dirty politics

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Generally political spouses do not enter the fray. There is an unwritten rule not to go after families.

That of course changes when the families go after you.

Then the gloves come off.

As I predicted the Labour leadership spill has got real nasty, and now Karen Price, Mrs Cunliffe for those who don’t know, has entered the political fray jumping on Twitter to abuse those who oppose her husband.

The distraught wife of Labour leadership contender David Cunliffe is behind a Twitter account that anonymously took aim at his rivals and critics.

Karen Price, a high-flying environmental lawyer, is understood to have started the @TarnBabe67 account on Saturday, the day Cunliffe indicated he would resign as Labour leader.

The account first attacked a newspaper for running candid pictures of the New Lynn MP, and went on to criticise others in the media. But the worst barbs were saved for those said to be in the “Anyone But Cunliffe” leadership faction, naming his rival Grant Robertson and MPs Trevor Mallard and Clayton Cosgrove.   Read more »

King: The 1980s were much worse

If you ever needed a sign in 2014 that your party needs rejuvenation, it’s your deputy leader telling the press that “The 1980s were much worse” [for Labour].

Labour’s caucus met [yesterday] and its former leader David Cunliffe resigned while David Parker was elevated from deputy leader to acting leader with Annette King as his deputy.

Ms King denied it was the most torrid time faced by Labour in her experience.

“The 1980s were much worse,” she said.

“Whenever there is a loss by a party there is going to be a time of turbulence. I have to say I’ve been there and seen that before. We will get through it, and we will come out of it and will be a strong party. This isn’t a permanent position.”

Mr Parker said he and Ms King – “the grandmother of the party now” – were chosen because they could offer stability and impartiality in the interim.

Seriously, when you have a grandmother of the party, you’re screwed.  This may not even be a two-term fix.  This may end up being a three term fix.   Read more »

The unacceptability of David Cunliffe

After David Cunliffe bizarrely compared himself to Helen Clark and Norman Kirk we are going to see a demonisation of David Cunliffe much like the attacks on Kevin Rudd by pro-Gillard forces in Australia like Stephen Conroy, Stephen Smith and Wayne Swan.

We have already seen this with the Ilam candidate, James Dann, damning Cunliffe in an open letter.

It will be systematic, and it will be nasty. His reputation will be trashed by his own team, making him completely unacceptable for the membership to foist him upon the caucus. The caucus knows that they can’t command the membership, but they can make Cunliffe so unpalatable that the unions will act.

The problem is caucus too is highly factionalised. Clayton Cosgrove has been acting the bully-boy strong arming other candidates to stand aside and promote Grant Robertson. The problem is Clayton Cosgrove is so thoroughly discredited after running a candidate campaign in Waimakiriri, one that failed and also delivered up an appalling party vote result. He is despised as a result, even by those on the right of the Labour caucus. But caucus has to block vote now to send a message to the membership that they cannot countenance a dud leader like David Cunliffe. They need to effectively veto Cunliffe but that won’t work.

It won’t work because the membership is feral left. That membership believes that David Cunliffe is a martyr and that he was set up to fail by the caucus…a caucus of centrist traitors to the socialist cause. The only thing that unites caucus right now is their mutual loathing of David Cunliffe.

The hard left of the party, stocked now with old Alliance war-horses, are more interested in being pure rather than being in power. They are septic that their mates like Carol Beaumont got rinsed and are on the outside. Beaumont is so thoroughly disliked that when asked to provide her with a job, Helen Kelly refused out-right. Of course it is the same hard-left that was pulling strings inside Labour for them to tank Kelvin Davis in Te Tai Tokerau. They loathe candidates like him and Stuart Nash. They believe in a puritanical socialism, where people like Nash and Davis are actually closet tories and should actually be run from the party rather than emulated for their electoral success.   Read more »

Brian Edwards on The Cunliffe – Bad reviews and a short season

My good friend Brian Edwards is not impressed with David Cunliffe and his latest performances.

To be absolutely fair to David  Cunliffe, I should perhaps add that, like all senior politicians, he has on his team people whose job it is to advise him on media issues, to analyse and comment on his radio and television appearances and to prepare him for upcoming interviews and debates, possibly by workshopping those exchanges. Their job is not to ra-ra their employer’s efforts but to be brutally frank in critically analysing his performance.

The blame for Cunliffe’s misguided and vote-losing approach to his exchanges with the Prime Minister during the last election and particularly his final televised debate with John Key on TV One, must be proportionally shared with those advisers.

I feel sorry for the advisors, because I suspect that David Cunliffe doesn’t take coaching at all well, and when he consults his mirror he gets conflicting advice.

The best television interviews look like chats. The tone is relaxed, the language informal, the posture forward, demonstrating interest and keenness. In last night’s interview with Campbell, Cunliffe’s tone is defensive and overbearing, his language formal and high-flown, his posture rigidly erect. His replies are repetitive and little more than a series of mini-speeches. He is talking at rather than to Campbell and the interviewer’s impatience and frustration become increasingly evident during the discussion. At one point Campbell accuses the former Labour Leader of being disingenuous.   Read more »

Labour candidate James Dann writes to David Cunliffe

One of Labour’s 2014 candidates has written an open letter to David Cunliffe.

The crux of the letter is the last few paragraphs.

I gave my campaign everything, and I am sure that you did the same. We ran a two ticks campaign in Ilam. All our material had “Party Vote Labour” proudly on it. We delivered tens of thousands of pieces of paper with your face on it. But the reality, the hard truth, is that people in the electorate just didn’t connect with you. I lost count of the number of times I door knocked someone who told me they had voted Labour all their life, but wouldn’t vote for us as long as you were leader. People who would have a Labour sign – but not one with your face on it. While those examples are strictly anecdotal, the result on election night isn’t. It’s unavoidable. It’s practically the worst result in the Party’s history.

I can’t imagine how that feels. I know you’re an ambitious guy, that being Prime Minister is something that you’ve probably dreamed of since you were a kid. I know what that’s like; I’ve entertained those thoughts myself. You’ve been closer than most people will ever get. But you’ve had your shot. The Labour Party isn’t a vehicle for you to indulge your fantasy of being Prime Minister. While you might think that it’s your destiny to be the visionary leader of this country, the country has a very different vision – and it doesn’t involve you.   Read more »

Susan Wood on Labour’s leadership farce

Susan Wood doesn’t hold back with her thoughts on Labour’s leadership farce.

I’ve been thinking about leadership – real leadership and what it means.

I think this quote from a Harvard university professor sums it up. “Leadership is about making others better as a result of your presence. And making it last in your absence”

That gets me to our political leadership and soon to be former Labour leader David Cunliffe. I have no doubt he is an intelligent man, a well-intentioned man. But he has failed as a leader. The voters rejected him and his own caucus turned on him. The men and women he is leading have not become better because of his leadership and his absence has left a gaping hole of indecision and infighting.

The election defeat was of course not all his fault, no more than the National victory was all John Key’s work. But a great deal of it was.

Yes indeed, and his failure to be accountable has annoyed a great many members.

Since election night Cunliffe has barely put a foot right. The bizarre election night speech, a failure to take responsibility then a belated acceptance of sorts, dragging his decision out for a week before standing aside only to stand again which will lead to a protracted public blood letting.    Read more »

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