Almost as good as his cat killing policy

Here I was thinking the other day that I don’t agree with Gareth Morgan on anything much at all, except for his cat killing policy.

But I have found another thing to agree with him on.

Flat Tax.

Now that is almost as good as his cat killing policy…it could be improved by providing additional tax rebates for cat killing professionals.

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John Cleese and Bill Maher on why you shouldn’t make jokes about Muslims

People who don’t like what I have to say, or the way I say it, just want me to go away.   Some even want me dead.

Such is the reaction of people that can’t cope with the open and frank exchange of ideas.

The video above touches on this.

I’ve coined a new phrase for the idiots that constantly want to shut me down, instead of celebrate my existence (however much they may disagree)…  you are political fundamentalists.   It’s your way, or silence.  Your way, or death.

I will fight to my last breath to defend for my rights, and yours, to speak freely and openly.

 

 

 

NZ Herald still not giving up on Dotcom

It’s quite the sausagefest over at the Herald, and they have jumped at the chance to defend Kim Dotcom, in an article they titled “John Banks’ wife’s obsessive detective work”.  (Double apostrophe bonus!)

Writes Vlad, one of our Whaleoil commenters:

I see that Dotcom is spinning like a top about this, and the Herald is of course eagerly publishing his bluster:

But Dotcom this afternoon told the Herald: “I’m just shaking my over John Banks.[SIC] I just don’t understand how he thinks this is going to change things.”

He said the meeting with the American businessmen took place “a couple of days before the donation meeting”.

“I think the meetings with the Americans was either on the 5th or 6th (of June 2010) and the meeting with the donations was I believe on the 9th.”

The problem for KDC and the Herald’s repeater is that this has already been considered by the Court of Appeal – this is what the judgement says: Read more »

Whaleoil Ground Crew: Can you find Barney?

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Canterbury

Canterbury Police are keen to talk to a witness to an alleged sexual assault that occurred on New Year’s Eve 1995/96 when a woman from Christchurch travelled to a dance party in the greater Nelson area called Entrain. Read more »

Chris Trotter sends a warning to Little Angry Andy

Chris Trotter thinks that Andrew Little has had a great week.

We disagreed as we shared a short conversation in the offices of Radio Live yesterday, but I have just read his column where he sends a veiled a warning to Andrew Little.

The message to the man he defeated by a single percentage point could not be clearer.

Little expects a lot more from his future Finance Minister than the standard neoliberal commitment to keeping the books in the black. He will not be judging the worth of Labour’s economic policies by the level of praise emanating from the business community. For Little, looking after the One Percent’s funds cannot be Labour’s first priority. The critical challenge confronting Labour’s next Finance Minister will be funding the changes so desperately needed by the other Ninety-Nine Percent.

In other words: how does Labour make sure that a rising tide of economic growth lifts more than just the luxury yachts?

Little has strongly hinted that the answer to that question does not lie in the introduction of a Capital Gains Tax, or raising the age of eligibility for superannuation from 65 to 67. New policies, based on the electorate’s most urgent needs, is what Little has asked for, and his promise to review the Shadow Cabinet’s performance in 12 months’ time strongly suggests that he means to get them. Little’s colleagues would be wise to assume that his threshold for failure is set a lot lower than his predecessors’.  Read more »

Mental Health Break

The Queen v Banks: the highlights

The full judgement can be found at the bottom, but here are the highlights.

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Read more »

Map of the Day

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Warrantless surveillance: Hook, line, sinker

The media and opposition appear to have fallen for the standard civil liberties play.

Here is how it goes.

Any reduction of civil liberties will be met by strong opposition.  That’s a given.   So, if you want to achieve something, make sure you actually make it sound worse.

After some time, “you’ve listened to the people of New Zealand”, and you withdraw the most contentious issue.

The civil liberty campaigners will see it as a victory, and… voila!  What you really wanted through … is through.

A classic master class in this was the introduction of “ID card” driving licenses.   At the time, they pushed the idea it would become a “national identity card”, and “mandatory photo ID”.

Cue the civil liberty campaigners…   after “listening”, the government stepped away from pushing it as far as they originally proposed, and… voila!   They achieved a photo-id database that was unprecedented at the time.  Not even passports were that “digitised” at the time.

Incidentally, all these civil liberties people were Missing In Action when all my private data was being intercepted and passed around without a search warrant – but I digress…

With that strategy of deliberately overexciting the numpties with a fake bit of policy in mind, I’ve been observing the current outcry about the “Terror” Bill.   The most contentious of it appears to be the 48 hours of surveillance without a search warrant. Read more »

Once again Len’s council tells us we should shut up, they know best

You know Auckland Council thinks it can do things better than anyone else when it diversifies away from its core responsibilities to indulge in a particular activity that is best conducted by private enterprise. the supremacy and arrogance of the Council has been a bad smell for some time but is about to get stinkier.

It’s urban compact city plans are not happening and its frustrated and desperate to make it happen.

And its usually at times like this that stupid decisions are made.

Len Brown has now announced that Auckland Council will form an Urban development agency to improve the city’s ability to address some of its’ pressing urban development needs. In short – it is going to jump right on into the very high risk game of property development.

Auckland Council’s Governing Body today agreed to support the establishment of an urban development agency to improve the city’s ability to address some of its pressing urban development needs.

The new entity, called Development Auckland, will have a key role in helping deliver the council priority of quality urban living and will have the mandate to deal with the challenge of Auckland’s rapid growth through regeneration and investment.  The agency will have the capability to deliver public and private development and infrastructure, including housing, across the region.

The new entity is a result of the realignment of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

Mayor Len Brown said: “Meeting Auckland’s development needs over the next 10 to 20 years requires a transformational shift in the council’s approach to urban development and regeneration

“Central government, the council, the private sector and the not-for-profit sector will be able to work together in a way that does not burden ratepayers further with the costs of growth, but rather sees them realise the benefits of it.

“The CCO review has provided Auckland Council with an opportunity to address this.”    Read more »