Monday nightCap

Before you ask for a selfie next time…

In a short video called Aspirational, the actress and director Matthew Frost pull focus to this weird cultural trend that has replaced those archaic pen-to-paper autographs. Although posing for a photo alongside another person seems like it would be more of an interactive experience, Dunst and Frost suggest that it is just a shallow attempt to document this faux-interaction for social-network bragging purposes rather than connect human to human. If there is no social-networking evidence of that interaction, after all, what’s the point?

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Daily Trivia

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Welcome to Daily Trivia.  There is a game to play here.  The photo above relates to one of the items below.  The first reader to correctly tell us in the comments what item the photo belongs to, and why, gets bragging rights.  Sometimes they are obvious, other times the obvious answer is the decoy.  Can you figure it out tonight?

Lego originally made wooden toys. Judging by recent developments, they may have to return to that business model. (source)   Read more »

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Experience counts

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Eye in the sky just wasting time

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Daily roundup

Whaleoil Backchat

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Labour review is doomed as they appoint the most odd collection of people

sad5

Former British politician Bryan Gould will head an independent inquiry into Labour’s dismal election result.

New Zealand-born Gould, who served as an MP with the British Labour Party from 1974 to 1979 and from 1983 to 1994, will convene the panel, which also includes former Speaker Margaret Wilson, Auckland lawyer and businessman Brian Corban and broadcaster Stacey Morrison.

And these people are going to do an in-depth review of policy, media, social media, Dirty Politics, policy, communications, strategy, fundraising and positioning are they?   Read more »

Court of Appeal turns down Dotcom: still needs to reveal all assets

I'm coming to steal your democracy

Kim, at his old place, during happier times

In its written decision released today, the Court upheld a High Court decision that Mr Dotcom must file an affidavit spelling out the nature, extent and value of all his assets.

Mr Dotcom’s lawyer Tracey Walker said the High Court rules did not allow the Hollywood studios to go on a ”fishing expedition” relating to Kim Dotcom’s assets.

Poor Tracey isn’t adding to her CV.  Kind of got on the job as Dotcom’s star was no longer on the rise. Read more »

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A reader contribution on the transport debate

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A reader emails:

Hello Cam

After reading your blog for several months now, I have seen it steadily transforming into a voice of alternative opinion in many ways, and celebrate that.

I had been working for some time on this piece about Auckland transport, when I read your article yesterday, which sang my song.

Just wondered whether this may have any appeal for your site.

Best regards and keep up the good work


Part 1

Observations:

As a recent returnee to Auckland after over 40 years working and establishing businesses in regional New Zealand, I have recently paid considerably more attention to local body plans and actions in this region.

Joining the local area ratepayers committee on arrival, I soon hear, and discover first hand that generalised wastage/inefficiency seemed to characterise virtually all dealings of the new super city. Examples: 1. a near 200 page document of detailed technical drawings and specifications to place some traffic quietening speed bumps on a street in our area, 2. Two Council staff visit in a Council car, for a half day, to consult re spending well less than $1000 on plants in the area. When it is suggested that the most in-need areas require some soil first, we are told that this is beyond their brief and would require a completely separate department to be involved.

Accordingly, I began to pay closer attention to Len Brown’s call for underground rail for the city, which seems to be preparing to strip all available capital and then some from the City’s coffers for the foreseeable future – and beyond – at the behest of one man with a dream.

The idea of a trainset for Auckland gained great credibility under Mayor Robbie in the late 60’s, and had it been implemented then, it would probably remain a good idea today. Most people in Auckland ‘know’ this so there remains a soft spot in Auckland for the notion of ‘rapid rail’ and relatively little opposition to Len Brown’s plan.

But is it a still good idea if we start now?

There are many new ways and new technologies in the wings, some of which I have observed first hand on our travels, which may soon render an underground trainset for Auckland, a costly white elephant.

Additionally, in a volcanic city and a ‘shaky’ nation, underground makes less sense. Imagine the chaos if a Christchurch-type earthquake broke the underground rail links, after all other public transport had been seriously weakened by rail’s availability.

With these concerns in mind, I decided to look more closely at overseas systems on our recent 4 month trip to the Middle East, UK, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, France, Monaco and Italy and the following observations also factor in some of the previous experiences I have had of undergrounds and public transport in Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Paris, Seoul, Hong Kong, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Australia and so on.

On this trip, I visited many cities of not too dissimilar size, one way or another, to Auckland i.e in area or in population. There are few that have both the area and the population of Auckland. In each city, I paid particular attention to their public transport options and in particular their trainsets. These included Abu Dhabi, Dubai, London, Istanbul, Madrid, Porto, Valencia, Granada, Barcelona, Nice, Monaco and Milan as well as many other less well known cities.

What I observed made me wonder whether this whole underground rail for Auckland proposal has been properly thought through.

Underground rail worked well, it seemed, in the sorts of high rise, high density cities that have relatively small footprints for their populations, like Madrid. Accordingly Granada, for example, is in the throes of beginning one, and I can see the point there. It is a compact city with many tourists.

Trainsets also seemed to work well in more widespread cities covering land areas like Auckland’s, even with intervening waterways, so long as they had one of the following conditions:

  1. High population (eg Istanbul, Sydney) or
  2. A long ribbon of development, as in a strip style city running along a shoreline (eg Dubai or Perth).

Read more »