A Gay perspective on Islam

dsc_0104-635x421

I have given this article the title  ‘A Gay perspective on Islam’, but after re  reading both the blog post quotes and the advertisement I realised that both have failed to link Sharia Law ( Which is Islam ) to the way homosexuals are treated in Palestine, Syria and Iran. It is this liberal failure to gloss over the root cause and to instead pretend it is a terrorist/autocratic thing that deeply concerns me. Why this fear to say what is so obvious? Saudi Arabia is held up as an almost perfect example of Islam and we all know how they treat women and gays.

The rights of LGBT people in Saudi Arabia are unrecognized. Homosexuality is frequently a taboo subject in Saudi Arabian society and is punished with imprisonment, fines, corporal punishment, capital punishment, whipping/flogging, and chemical castrations.

-wiki

I think people are confused because they see Islam as a religion and separate from politics/government. It is the fact that religion and politics are the exact same thing in Islam that is the problem. The Islamic activists are very honest about this. They say Islam is Sharia and Sharia is Islam. Historically and now there is no shortage of hard evidence that this is the case, so why are the victims so afraid to name their oppressor? I think that the below advertisement is great but it is like the victim of child abuse speaking out against the social worker who placed them with the pedophile rather than speaking out against the pedophile who abused them.

Read more »

Matti Friedman on the Media’s Obsession with Israel

This speech by Matti Friedman, a journalist, explains much about the manipulation by media organisations against Israel.

It is being liberally published and has appeared at Honest Reporting and Quadrant Online.

I doubt it will get published in any mainstream media here, so I will.

Read it and understand how you are being manipulated, particularly over issues concerning Israel. It is quite long but very revealing.

One night several years ago, I came out of Bethlehem after a reporting assignment and crossed through the Israeli military checkpoint between that city and its neighbor, Jerusalem, where I live. With me were perhaps a dozen Palestinian men, mostly in their thirties – my age. No soldiers were visible at the entrance to the checkpoint, a precaution against suicide bombers. We saw only steel and concrete. I followed the other men through a metal detector into a stark corridor and followed instructions barked from a loudspeaker – Remove your belt! Lift up your shirt! The voice belonged to a soldier watching us on a closed-circuit camera. Exiting the checkpoint, adjusting my belt and clothing with the others, I felt like a being less than entirely human and understood, not for the first time, how a feeling like that would provoke someone to violence.

Consumers of news will recognize this scene as belonging to the Israeli occupation of the West Bank, which keeps the 2.5 million Palestinians in that territory under military rule, and has since 1967. The facts of this situation aren’t much in question. This should be an issue of concern to Israelis, whose democracy, military, and society are corroded by the inequality in the West Bank. This, too, isn’t much in question.

The question we must ask, as observers of the world, is why this conflict has come over time to draw more attention than any other, and why it is presented as it is. How have the doings in a country that constitutes 0.01 percent of the world’s surface become the focus of angst, loathing, and condemnation more than any other? We must ask how Israelis and Palestinians have become the stylized symbol of conflict, of strong and weak, the parallel bars upon which the intellectual Olympians of the West perform their tricks – not Turks and Kurds, not Han Chinese and Tibetans, not British soldiers and Iraqi Muslims, not Iraqi Muslims and Iraqi Christians, not Saudi sheikhs and Saudi women, not Indians and Kashmiris, not drug cartel thugs and Mexican villagers.

Questioning why this is the case is in no way an attempt to evade or obscure reality, which is why I opened with the checkpoint leading from Bethlehem. On the contrary – anyone seeking a full understanding of reality can’t avoid this question. My experiences as a journalist provide part of the answer, and also raise pressing questions that go beyond the practice of journalism.

I have been writing from and about Israel for most of the past 20 years, since I moved there from Toronto at age 17. During the five and a half years I spent as part of the international press corps as a reporter for the American news agency The Associated Press, between 2006 and 2011, I gradually began to be aware of certain malfunctions in the coverage of the Israel story – recurring omissions, recurring inflations, decisions made according to considerations that were not journalistic but political, all in the context of a story staffed and reported more than any other international story on earth. When I worked in the AP’s Jerusalem bureau, the Israel story was covered by more AP news staff than China, or India, or all of the fifty-odd countries of sub-Saharan Africa combined.

This is representative of the industry as a whole.       Read more »

Eleanor Catton carries on her leftist tirades

Eleanor Catton sounds like she is standing for public office, rather than dipping her well trained snout once again into the trough.

She has an opinion piece in the Sunday Star-Times and once again rants on about political things.

She will of course get mightly upset when she gets smacked around the ears for it, you see free speech is only for the left, everyone else has to shut up.

As is usual she thinks because she is a tenured liberal academic elite that what she says, no matter how wrong, is the gospel truth.

Imagine the  sudden dissolution of all sports stadiums, fitness centres and recreational facilities in New Zealand, rationalised by the argument that if kids want to learn about sport they can watch it on TV. Such a proposition is absurd.

But sitting on the couch, watching a game of rugby, bears as little relation to actually playing the game as clicking through websites does to reading a book – especially when that book has been requested, sourced, or chosen according to the individual interests of the child.

The notion that online content is ‘interactive’ in a way that reading books is not is absolutely backwards. Physicality is immensely important to children, as is the enormous sense of achievement that comes when you check out a book from the library, when you finish it, when you return it, when you find it on the shelf again.

A book has dimension. It is a doorway.

A screen is all surface. How many adults can sit at a computer terminal and read diligently and immersively, for hours? How many can then retain what they have read?

Read more »

Little better than the rest says TV3 poll, really?

55 percent you say? Is that all?

55 percent you say? Is that all?

According to a released TV3 poll Andrew Little is supposedly better than the rest of the muppets who were leader before him.

In attempt to get some good news out early for Andrew Little it appears TV3 has led early with the one result Andrew Little supposedly shines in.

He’s just two months into the job, but already Labour leader Andrew Little is outshining all his predecessors since Helen Clark, according today’s 3 News-Reid Research poll.

It’s the first political poll of the year and sets the tone for what’s set to be a rip-roaring battle of the leaders as Mr Little takes on Prime Minister John Key.

The poll shows 55 percent of voters think Mr Little is potentially a better match for Mr Key than his predecessors.

3 News Political Editor Patrick Gower says there’s a warning for the Prime Minister in today’s poll.

“Even National Party supporters think Little’s one to watch, that will force Key to sit up and take notice. There’s no room for complacency this term.

“Key’s popularity hasn’t been dented and Labour’s revolving leadership has struggled to get one over him, but this poll shows he may have finally met his match.”

The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percent.

Read more »

The cowardly head hackers are now killing street magicians

I don’t think David Copperfield will be doing any shows in Syria anytime soon.

ISIS it appears has run out of gays and journalists to kill and is now hacking the heads off street magicians.

The Islamic State is no stranger to attacking civilians. Recently, though, they’ve been targeting not only gay people and journalists but also subversive magicians. Earlier this month, reports emerged of a street performer who was beheaded in a public square in the city of Raqqa, Syria, the capital of the Islamic State.

The illusionist, who went by the moniker “Sorcerer,” was known for entertaining locals with innocuous magic tricks like making coins and cell phones disappear. According to UK tabloid the Daily Mirror, he was charged with “creating illusions and falsehood” deemed offensive to Islam and was sentenced to death by beheading. An activist who recently fled Raqqa and was familiar with Sorcerer told the Mirror that the magician was a popular performer who simply entertained locals: “He was just called ‘Sorcerer’ by people, and children loved him. He was doing nothing anti-Islamic but he paid for it with his life.”

The Islamic State has been cracking down on all forms of magic. The video below was released in July by the organization’s media arm and shows a man from Aleppo moments before he is beheaded for sorcery. Another propaganda video shows militants scouring a so-called “sorcerer’s nest” for books about magic and declaring that the appropriate penalty is to be struck by a sword.    Read more »

Tagged:

Perhaps Gareth Morgan can give them some advice

Gareth Morgan has all sorts of advice lately, but perhaps he might like to take his motorbike on a trip to Vietnam to give them some assistance with a little culinary problem they are having.

VICE News reports:

Just after midnight on Tuesday, police in Hanoi detained a truck smuggling three tons of live cats into Vietnam. The driver, a 30-year-old man named Hoang Van Hieu, admitted that the ill-begotten cats were bound for restaurants in the country, where cat meat is, in fact, a delicacy, especially in the provinces of Thai Binh and Nam Dinh, not far from Hanoi.

“After receiving a tip, we searched the truck and discovered the cats inside,” Sky News quoted Dong Da district deputy chief of police Cao Van Loc as saying. “The owner, also the driver, said he bought the cats at the [Chinese] border area of Quang Ninh province. All of the cats were from China.”

With an average adult weight of about ten pounds for a healthy domestic feline, three tons means we’re talking hundreds of cats. The animals, crammed on top of one another in bamboo cages, were just the latest haul in a small cat-trafficking market that sources from nearby China, Laos, and Thailand to satiate Vietnam’s appetite for kitty flesh.    Read more »

Tagged:

Whaleoil General Debate

Good morning. The Whaleoil General Debate posts appear at 7 am and 6 pm (Backchat). You don’t have to stay “on topic” in these posts like you do in all others. Feel free to share your own stories, links to other news or catch up with friends. If you haven’t tried it before, signing in to a Disqus account is free, quick, and it is easy.

Commenters should familiarise themselves with our Commenting and Moderation rules. Thank you.


Trouble commenting on Whaleoil? Read this first. You can receive free help. Do not email via the Contact Page.

Just email [email protected] with your concerns.  Please be polite and as precise as you can be.  Remember: this is a unpaid volunteer service provided by other Whaleoil readers.  Only contact them with commenting related problems.

Mystery face of the day

kiwi130

Today’s mystery face of the day is Rachael from Hamilton.

Screen shot 2015-01-31 at 6.40.40 PM

She is my mystery face of the day because of her ad on Trademe for something crazy awesome that she built.

As I type this post bidding has reached $200. The auction finishes Sunday 8th Feb 9pm.

Disclaimer: I do not know the creator of Noah’s Ark and am not receiving any form of reimbursement in the form of cold hard cash in brown paper bags or chocolate treats. I just spotted it on Trademe and thought it deserved a wider audience.

Read more »

Daily Proverb

Proverbs 31

13 She finds wool and flax and busily spins it.

Saturday nightCap