Corrections’ Ray Smith on Philip Smith: “We failed”

Turns out, with some navel gazing, the pedo turned murderer shouldn’t even have been out there all by himself.

Well.

DUH

[E]scaped murderer and paedophile Phillip John Smith should never have been let out of Spring Hill Prison on temporary release in the first place.

A Corrections review has concluded the department’s plans for Smith, who skipped the country for Brazil, were over-ambitious and misinformed, and it makes more than a dozen recommendations.

Smith was dumb enough to get recaptured, but he still outwitted Corrections.

“We failed,” says Corrections chief executive Ray Smith. “We failed to manage a serious offender on temporary release. I absolutely accept that.”

They should feel lucky that it only turned into the farce that it has – he could have gone properly underground and be grooming new kids to be his victims by now. ¬† Read more »

Chisholm Inquiry – Four Answered Questions For Matt Nippert

Matt Nippert is keen to keep flogging the dead horse that is the Chisholm Inquiry. ¬†He asks four questions that he thinks are unanswered. No one outside the small selection on the Beltway could possibly care about this heading into the second 24 hours but…

Here at Whaleoil we are particularly keen to help the infirm, bewildered and lazy so will answer them for Matty.

1. Who didn’t the Inquiry hear from?

Hong Kong-based blogger Cathy Odgers, ruled by Chisholm to have been part of a campaign to undermine Adam Feeley, was allowed to provide a “very detailed” written declaration in lieu of interview.

And former Hanover boss Mark Hotchin, despite his offer to talk from overseas via video link, was also not interviewed. At the time of the email the SFO was investigating Hanover, and the investigation was eventually dropped with no charges laid.

Cactus¬†provided a voluntary highly detailed 7,500 word statement to the Inquiry. ¬†She never at law even had to do that because she was never forced to appear at the Inquiry. ¬†Justice Chisholm accepted all of her¬†statement as evidence. ¬†The fact that Fran O’Sullivan called Justice Chisholm in her slag column¬†a “respected” High Court Judge should mean that his accepting of Cactus’ evidence should be the end of it. ¬†Cactus wasn’t called to the Inquiry formally for an interview most likely because O’Sullivan had already tainted the Inquiry with her vile attacks on three witnesses to it¬†as soon as she could reach a keyboard. ¬†Mark Hotchin wasn’t called to the Inquiry because Justice Chisholm already had all the information he needed to draw a conclusion. ¬†Along with Judith Collins he was completely exonerated in the Inquiry.

2. What information wasn’t considered?

“The absence of telephone records for Mr Slater’s calls is surprising given that both Ms Collins and Mr Slater confirmed that they phoned each other often,” Justice Chisholm said.

So here we have a journalist questioning a “respected” High Court Judge after the Judge has gone to the effort of conducting a very extensive Inquiry, breached ¬†privacy to gain evidence and Nippert¬†thinks that this isn’t good enough after 99 pages? ¬†If Justice Chisholm was unhappy with the evidence he obtained then he damn well would have asked for more. He wasn’t the sort of man who would have held back and the painful length of his interviews proved that. ¬†The¬†Inquiry was already intrusive enough anyone staying awake long enough to read the report should see that. ¬†¬† Read more »

So who leaked the SIS report?

Well, the report has been released, and it was leaked to media the day before.

So who did it and have they broken the law.

The question of breaking the law is an easy one…yes, whoever leaked the report broke the law. I know this because the day before the report was released I received a letter from the Inspector-general outlining the embargo and law that pertained to it and told me in no uncertain terms what would happen should I leak details of the report.

igis

So that makes the law very clear.

Now we come to who could have leaked the information that the media ran with the day before the report was released.

This is where I think the leaker made a strategic and tactical error.

The number of people privy tot he report details was incredibly small. Worse than that the numbers of copies that were in existence was even smaller.

When I was offered a chance to review the draft report I was only able to read it in a secure location, and under supervision from an authorised person. Once I had read the report then all copies and all pieces of paper were removed from my possession.

I can’t imagine it would have been any different for almost everyone else in the¬†inquiry, except the politicians who seem to have rules for themselves that places them above everyone else. ¬† Read more »

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Liars, Damn liars and The NZ Herald

One of these things is not like the other. Can you spot the difference?

How is it that both accounts were based on the exact same report yet came to such different conclusions?

Ms Gwyn said she had also investigated allegations, made before and during the course of the inquiry, that NZSIS officers had acted in collusion with Mr Slater or under direction from the Prime Minister or the Prime Minister’s Office. Ms Gwyn said that these allegations were particularly serious and that she had made full use of her statutory powers to investigate them.

‚ÄúFrom that thorough investigation, I do not believe that any NZSIS staff member contacted Mr Slater to instigate his OIA request. Nor have I found any collusion or direction between the NZSIS and the Prime Minister or his Office.‚ÄĚ

-Scoop ( )

Read more »

Sore losers

The Internet party continues to delude themselves that they are relevant and are moaning like unpaid hookers.

“The Key administration has plumbed new depths of arrogance and contempt for the notion of politicians being accountable for their actions in its response to today’s hugely embarrassing report by the independent watchdog who maintains oversight over the Security Intelligence Service.

Rather than take the findings of the report by the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Cheryl Gwyn on the chin, National sought to bury the report.”

Not fot to govern Aotearoa !

Read more »

Whaleoil General Debate

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Face of the day

Pippa Doyle

Pippa Doyle

One of New Zealand’s most secretive military organisations has opened its high-security doors for a 93-year-old woman.

Tonight, it was a meeting of war heroes when New Zealand’s Victoria Cross winner Willie Apiata kissed 93-year-old Pippa Doyle, one of the great if unknown secret agents of World War II.

Apiata was in the audience as Pippa ‚Äď otherwise known as Phyllis Latour Doyle ‚Äď received France’s highest decoration: the Chevalier de l’Ordre National de la Legion d’Honneur, the Legion of Honour (knight class).

 DAVID WHITE/Fairfax NZ TOP HONOUR: The Legion of Honour medal which was presented to Pippa Doyle.


DAVID WHITE/Fairfax NZ
TOP HONOUR: The Legion of Honour medal which was presented to Pippa Doyle.

Read more »

Daily Proverb

Proverbs 25

10 Others may accuse you of gossip, and you will never regain your good reputation.

Tuesday nightCap

Chris Pratt On Hunting

Caution:  Language

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