Tuesday nightCap

Enjoy the end of the world

(Turn the sound up)

Tagged:

Today’s Trivia

3809738-3x2-700x467

Welcome to Daily Trivia. There is a game to play here. The photo above relates to one of the items below. The first reader to correctly tell us in the comments what item the photo belongs to, and why, gets bragging rights. Sometimes they are obvious, other times the obvious answer is the decoy. Can you figure it out tonight?  

You are 14% more likely to die on your birthday than any other day of the year. (source)   Read more »

Not sure the radiator works, but ok, it’s fun

Tagged:

Mates

Tagged:

Daily Roundup

WH1SWdo

Not sure if they meant to do that

Read more »

Whaleoil Backchat

Good Evening, Welcome To The Daily Whaleoil Backchat.

You don’t have to stay “on topic” in these posts like you do in all others. Feel free to share your own stories, links to other news or catch up with friends. If you haven’t tried it before, signing in to a Disqus account is free, quick, and it is easy.

New commenters should familiarise themselves with our Commenting and Moderation rules. Thank you.


Trouble commenting on Whaleoil? Read this first. You can receive free help. Do not email via the Contact Page.

Just email [email protected] with your concerns.  Please be polite and as precise as you can be.  Remember: this is a volunteer service provided by other Whaleoil readers.  Only contact them with commenting related problems.

Tagged:

Restrict immigration? Good idea, let’s start with Islamic immigration

Fairfax reports:

Immigration is set to hit record levels, pushing up house prices over the coming year, but Prime Minister John Key believes immigrants’ skills are needed and enough houses are “in the pipeline” in Auckland to meet the influx.

In their monthly update to ministers yesterday, Treasury officials said net permanent and long-term (PLT) migration in the year ending March was “likely to exceed our [December] Half Year Update forecast of a peak of 52,400″.

Inflows were expected to start easing in the first half of this year, and the impact on house prices and household wealth appeared more subdued in this cycle, possibly because of the concentration of 20-34-year-olds in the numbers.

“However, it is possible that the strength in PLT arrivals recently may begin to impact housing demand more significantly over the coming year,” they warned.

Key said there was no question immigration has some impact on housing.

“Generally, the Reserve Bank takes the view that net migration is positive for the economy but has some spill-over implications.”

Read more »

Climate Clowns claim war in Syria caused by Climate Change

There is an ever growing list of claims of the things caused by climate change. 

Not a single one of them has proved true and many are simply crazy claims.

Now there is another claim, that the war in Syria and Iraq was caused by climate change.

Drawing one of the strongest links yet between global warming and human conflict, researchers said Monday that an extreme drought in Syriabetween 2006 and 2009 was most likely due to climate change, and that the drought was a factor in the violent uprising that began there in 2011.

The drought was the worst in the country in modern times, and in a studypublished Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists laid the blame for it on a century-long trend toward warmer and drier conditions in the Eastern Mediterranean, rather than on natural climate variability.

The researchers said this trend matched computer simulations of how the region responds to increases in greenhouse-gas emissions, and appeared to be due to two factors: a weakening of winds that bring moisture-laden air from the Mediterranean and hotter temperatures that cause more evaporation.  Read more »

Key announces MP pay cut – public sector unions pucker up

A move to rein in politicians’ pay doesn’t give moral authority to the Government in upcoming pay negotiations, public sector representatives say.

Prime Minister John Key will use urgent legislation to overhaul the Remuneration Authority Act as a result of anger at the size of MPs’ pay increases.

MPs’ pay will now be pegged to the average public sector pay increase for the previous year.

That means the latest pay rise will now be between 1 and 2 per cent – with the Government taking more advice before revealing the exact amount.

Richard Wagstaff, the Public Service Association national secretary, said 40,000 members in bargaining this year earn a lot less than those in Parliament.

“I think it is a political distraction what the PM says … now they think they have the moral authority to tell everyone else, no matter how badly paid, they don’t deserve a pay rise.”

PPTA president Angela Roberts said teachers’ pay had not kept pace with inflation.

“[MPs] have basically kept up with inflation, and what they’re saying is they’d like to keep up. We have a hefty catch-up before we can go into the future with a keep-up [pay-rise].” Read more »

Tagged: