Map of the Day

Update on my cellphone coverage, solution found

On Saturday I wrote about the non-existent cellphone coverage I am experiencing and explored with my readers possible solutions.

My choices were:

  • Stay with Spark and get some sort of expensive booster thingy
  • Move to Vodafone, a company that I used to be with for 15 years and left because of poor service.
  • Move to 2Degrees that appeared on the surface to have better coverage, but using a company who had blacklisted me with their advertising.

The second and third options were as unpalatable as coughing a large amount of money for a repeater/booster thingy.

Still with 285,000 plus readers there was a marketing opportunity for an astute and fast moving company.

One company was fast moving.

Can you guess which?   Read more »

Campbell will have a major sugar overload tonight

campbellJohn Campbell is going to have to eat an awful lot of lollies tonight.

Here at Campbell Live, we couldn’t wait for election night and took things into our own hands with lolly polls throughout the country.

It is nothing official and not terribly scientific but a whole lot of fun – despite the temptation we have held on to the lollies.

Here is a recap of all the lolly polls conducted throughout the country:

  • Te Tai Tokerau was won by Mana Party leader Hone Harawira.
  • East Coast Bays electorate was won by National’s Murray McCully.
  • Auckland Central electorate was won by Labour’s Jacinda Ardern.
  • Epsom electorate was won by National’s Paul Goldsmith.

Read more »

How about all those game changers, eh?

During the last parliamentary term we were all told repeatedly that this policy or that person was a “game changer”.

How did those game changers all work out?

Chris Trotter thought Matt McCarten was a game changer:

These are the stakes the Left is playing for – and they could not be higher. If progressive New Zealand rallies to Cunliffe’s and McCarten’s bright-red banner and helps them convince Middle New Zealand that Labourism, far from being an alien and dangerous creed, actually stands for all that is best in this nation, then it will have won an historic and lasting victory. But if it fails to seize the opportunity it has been given, then all that is worth fighting for on the Left will go down to defeat and New Zealand will be National’s for the foreseeable future.

Now IS the time for all good comrades to come to the aid of the party. Because, whichever way it turns out, the appointment of Matt McCarten is bound to be a game-changer.

Chris Trotter was very prescient in that post, he also predicted disaster.

[T]he Left has been given an extraordinary opportunity to prove that it still has something to offer New Zealand, but a desperately short period of time in which to do it. If old wounds, old grudges, old defeats (are you listening Jim?) are allowed to get in the way of making this unprecedented situation work to the advantage of ordinary New Zealanders, then it will end in failure.

And that failure won’t just be Cunliffe’s and McCarten’s, it will be the failure of the entire progressive movement. And it won’t just be for a triennium (or three) it will be for an entire generation.

If Cunliffe and McCarten are allowed to fail, the Right of the Labour Party and their fellow travellers in the broader labour movement (all the people who worked so hard to prevent Cunliffe rising to the leadership) will say:

“Well, you got your wish. You elected a leader pledged to take Labour to the Left. And just look what happened. Middle New Zealand ran screaming into the arms of John Key and Labour ended up with a Party Vote even more pitiful than National’s in 2002! So don’t you dare try peddling that ‘If we build a left-wing Labour Party they will come’ line ever again! You did – and they didn’t.”

Be in no doubt that this will happen – just as it did in the years after the British Labour Party’s crushing defeat in the general election of 1983. The Labour Right called Labour’s socialist manifesto “the longest suicide note in history” and the long-march towards Blairism and the re-writing of Clause Four began. (Never mind the impact of Maggie Thatcher’s unlikely victory in the South Atlantic, it was Michael Foot’s socialism wot won it for the Tories!)

Plenty of others thought Matt McCarten was a game changer…they just didn’t realise he wasn’t working for Labour. He certainly was a game changer…for National.    Read more »

Photo Of The Day

This photo from the Smile Club was published in a Dutch illustrated magazine Het Leven, in 1937.

This photo from the Smile Club was published in a Dutch illustrated magazine Het Leven, in 1937.

The Creepy Story of How Budapest Became a “City of Smiles” in the 1930s

Read more »

Midday madness

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Russell Brown dissects the election

tearsofimpotentragePosts, pans, and pannier bags blogger Russell Brown is having conniptions over the minutiae of the election.

1. Christ, what a shellacking. Click around Harkanwal Singh’s Herald interactive. In electorate after electorate, polling place after polling place, National won at least a plurality of the votes. Even where voters collectively chose to return their Labour MPs to Parliament, they generally gave their party votes to National. Labour won the party vote in only five general electorates. I don’t think it’s viable for Cunliffe to stay on after this.

No it isn’t. Cunliffe must go and go now….he lost his own party vote in New Lynn FFS!

3. The election was not primarily about policy. Although it will understandably be regarded as a mandate for National’s policies, I don’t think this has been an election about policy, but about who the voters have seen as fit to govern. Where discrete policies have been tested in polls, the public has often-as-not favoured Labour’s over National’s. They just didn’t back Labour to enact them. I’m very concerned now over what happens in education, where I think the degree of the mess National has already made (National Standards is objectively a shambles) is not widely appreciated.

Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit: SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Cunliffe is tits at fundraising

On election night and the day after Labour’s worst election result in more than 80 years David Cunliffe claimed that Labour has no money.

He was using that as an excuse for the loss.

What Cunliffe forgot is that the people most responsible for fundraising are firstly the leader. If people don’t like you then raising money is doubly hard. As we have seen 75% of the voting population decided to cast their votes elsewhere and that is due in a large part to the unlikeability of David Cunliffe.

Secondly the President and General Secretary are also responsible. My Labour sources, both inside Fraser House and in the wider party tell me that fundraising efforts were vetoed or blocked by Tim Barnett and/or Moira Coatsworth. At the same time they refused to fundraise themselves, thinking it was beneath them.

David Cunliffe has been dead set useless as Labour leader. He has managed to tank Labour’s vote to an undeniably bad level.

One of the worst parts of Cunliffe’s leadership, just as it was with Phil Goff and David Shearer’s leadership, is their inability to raise money.

Instead of working their guts out like Don Brash did to rebuild National’s war chest Cunliffe blames everyone elseRead more »

The social media election? Yeah, Nah

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Callum Valentine – Social Media “genius”

This election was billed as the social media election by  many pundits, and some political parties.

The Internet party in particular banked their success on social media.

Kim Dotcom and his little band of failures including Callum Valentine, a supposed social media genius, all told us that their much vaunted apps would secure them victory.

They also told us that their masses of Facebook likes and Twitter followers were going to get them over the line.

They were wrong.

Matthew Beveridge even had an entire blog devoted to analysing and writing about the social media election. He was wrong too.

Matthew has written a blog post about the effects of social media, where he finally cottons on to what I have been saying for a very long time.

I am a huge fan of social media. I love how it allows candidates, MPs and parties to talk directly to voters. I love how it allows people, who would never otherwise meet, to interact with each other and to learn from each other. But it has its limitations. It is very much a self selecting environment. It is incredibly easy to end up with a timeline that is nothing but an echo chamber.

For a number of people on the left, and even some parties on the left. I have a feel this is what has happened. They have seen all the talk about how it is time to change the government. About how the media is biased. How about dirty politics will resonate with the electorate. As well as about many other issues. But they forget that social media in general, and Twitter in particular, are not accurate representations of the rest of the electorate. I blogged earlier about how when dirty politics was being talked about on Twitter, it wasn’t really connecting with the electorate. The articles that were being read on TVNZ, Herald and Stuff were not the ones about dirty politics. They were about the every day things that mattered to, or interested, average voters.

Read more »