Passing lane speeder idea – fix of pipe dream?

via Stuff

via Stuff

…how does it explain why people actually speed up when the road widens? To do that, we need to refer to what is known as “risk homeostasis”. This is the idea that all of us have a certain amount of perceived risk that we think is acceptable. When the perceived risk is below that particular level (or goes above it), we change our behaviour to adjust how much risk we feel. When a narrow road becomes wider (such as with the addition of a passing lane), the risk sensation decreases and our behaviour changes to reflect that. Read more »

Hire a large plane and sew a giant parachute

www.mirror.co.uk World's largest cargo plane ...

www.mirror.co.uk
World’s largest cargo plane …

What do you do when countries make it almost impossible to return illegal migrants?

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Mental Health Break

Explosion in Sweden: another lone wolf with mental issues and unclear motive

The Right Scoop spotted this story breaking on social media, and the news is still developing, but it does appear to be the case that there was an explosion at a residential building in Malmö, Sweden in the 9pm hour (local time). Here’s a report from an Australian news channel.

The on-air anchor says it is an area with “a high Muslim population” and that it happens on the same day as a Gay Pride march, which are both merely circumstantial facts and should not be seen as drawing a conclusion.

The reports come just days after another incident in the same city, where a victim was shot in broad daylight. The circumstances, again, have a theme.

They may have a theme, but we can not actually expect the media to spell it out.

More in the comments as the situation develops and confirmed information is released.  Readers can contribute.

Whaleoil readership survey results: If Whaleoil was a bird it would be a…

animal-dream.com Falcon - Photo#02

animal-dream.com
Falcon – Photo#02

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 10.36.45 AM Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 10.36.55 AM

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Map of the Day

Take a little

The free fundraising lunch has come to an end.

Givealittle’s decision to start charging a 5 percent fee from September could put people off donating, says an organiser of the Awaroa beach fundraising campaign.

The crowdfunding website has not charged people anything to date, but it said it needed to now to ensure it could continue operating.

The amount raised on the website by individuals and groups has grown in the past three years from $500,000 a year, to $22 million a year.

Givealittle chief executive Tom Beyer said the fee would help ensure long-term stability.

“The growth and that generosity over the last three years has been quite phenomenal. It’s now at 40 times the volume that it was four years ago.

“And that volume of generosity comes with costs and we pay a lot of money in bank fees, and payment processing fees and web posting cost as well.

“And we have an awesome team that looks at every page created on the site before it can take donations.” Read more »

An open letter to Penny Webster

Dear Penny,

As you will have seen Whaleoil has decided to give you some extra coverage of your Auckland City Council election ad in the Helensville News.

We wanted to take up your offer of “Ask Penny Anything”, so we went to your web site but it is under construction.

http://pennywebster.co.nz/

index

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Merkel macht frei

German chancellor Angela Merkel is facing down pressure to change Germany’s refugee policy in the wake of a deadly week of refugee related violence.

Mrs Merkel, who interrupted her summer holiday to hold the news conference in Berlin, said the asylum seekers who had carried out the attacks had “shamed the country that welcomed them”.

But she insisted that those fleeing persecution and war had a right to be protected, and Germany would “stick to our principles” in giving shelter to the deserving.

Referring to the attacks that have taken place in France, Belgium, Turkey, the US and elsewhere, she said “taboos of civilisation” had been broken, and they were intended to “spread fear and hatred between cultures and between religions”.

But in reference to her famous phrase “Wir schaffen das” or “We can do this” – uttered last year when she agreed to take in a million migrants – Mrs Merkel said: “I am still convinced today that “we can do it”.

“It is our historic duty and this is a historic challenge in times of globalisation. We have already achieved very, very much in the last 11 months”.

It’s Germany’s historic cumulative guilt for the actions of their fathers and fathers’ fathers.  Read more »

Photo of the Day

Wendy Brown: Photo Jeff Maysh.

Wendy Brown: Photo Jeff Maysh.

Why One Woman Pretended to Be a High-School Cheerleader

At 33, Wendy Brown stole her daughter’s name, grabbed a pair of pom-poms, lived a teenage dream—then she went to jail for it

Wendy Brown had always dreamed of becoming a cheerleader when she was in high school. Unfortunately the dream never came true and she found herself in a position where she was 33-years-old and raising her 15-year-old daughter. Since Brown resembled her daughter and had access to her daughter’s ID, she used her daughter’s credentials to enrol in a high school and join the cheerleading squad.

On September 2, 2008, a shy, blonde transfer student strolled into Ashwaubenon High School in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The petite sophomore wore a pink hoodie and carried a new school bag decorated with hearts, eager to start the new term. But just 16 days later, she was standing in court wearing an orange prison jumpsuit and shackles, charged with identity theft. There, prosecutors revealed that Wendy Brown was not really 15, but a 33-year-old mother of two—who had stolen her teenage daughter’s identity in an attempt to relive her own high school days. In her weeks as a student, Brown had taken classes with students half her age. She had tried out for the Ashwaubenon High School cheerleading squad and even attended a pool party thrown by the cheer coach.

Television crews surrounded the courthouse and besieged Brown’s family at their home in Nevada. “It was bad,” recalls her father, Joe. “Every show that’s on in the morning called. … Oprah didn’t call. She was the only one that didn’t call.”

A bespectacled Brown spoke like a teenager as she addressed the court: “I just wanted to say that I’m sorry for what I’ve done,” she said softly. “I feel bad about it. And I regret it. Um, I always have … I am not a bad person. I just made a mistake.”

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