Andrew Sullivan decides to quit blogging

One of my big influencers in blogging has decided to quit after 15 years.

One of the things I’ve always tried to do at the Dish is to be up-front with readers. This sometimes means grotesque over-sharing; sometimes it means I write imprudent arguments I have to withdraw; sometimes it just means a monthly update on our revenues and subscriptions; and sometimes I stumble onto something actually interesting. But when you write every day for readers for years and years, as I’ve done, there’s not much left to hide. And that’s why, before our annual auto-renewals, I want to let you know I’ve decided to stop blogging in the near future.

Why? Two reasons. The first is one I hope anyone can understand: although it has been the most rewarding experience in my writing career, I’ve now been blogging daily for fifteen years straight (well kinda straight). That’s long enough to do any single job. In some ways, it’s as simple as that. There comes a time when you have to move on to new things, shake your world up, or recognize before you crash that burn-out does happen.

The second is that I am saturated in digital life and I want to return to the actual world again. I’m a human being before I am a writer; and a writer before I am a blogger, and although it’s been a joy and a privilege to have helped pioneer a genuinely new form of writing, I yearn for other, older forms. I want to read again, slowly, carefully. I want to absorb a difficult book and walk around in my own thoughts with it for a while. I want to have an idea and let it slowly take shape, rather than be instantly blogged. I want to write long essays that can answer more deeply and subtly the many questions that the Dish years have presented to me. I want to write a book.

I want to spend some real time with my parents, while I still have them, with my husband, who is too often a ‘blog-widow’, my sister and brother, my niece and nephews, and rekindle the friendships that I have simply had to let wither because I’m always tied to the blog. And I want to stay healthy. I’ve had increasing health challenges these past few years. They’re not HIV-related; my doctor tells me they’re simply a result of fifteen years of daily, hourly, always-on-deadline stress. These past few weeks were particularly rough – and finally forced me to get real.

Read more »

Good riddance to bad rubbish, Sabin resigns

Mike Sabin has resigned before Prime Minister John Key was going to have to do the inevitable.

His position was untenable and if the likely charges are what I expect them to be it was never a survivable situation.

The stupidity of the whole situation was that the National party has known about this since before Christmas and people who should know better ignored the warnings and let the situation fester.

At least he is now gone.

Northland MP Mike Sabin has announced he has resigned as a member of Parliament, effective immediately.

There have been reports Mr Sabin was being investigated by police over assault-related allegations, although neither Mr Sabin, the police nor Prime Minister John Key would confirm that. Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Associated Press

Photo: Associated Press

Space Shuttle Challenger

Exploded 29 Years Ago 

Read more »

Russel Norman resigns as co-leader of the Green Taliban

A picture paints a thousand words:

A beaming Metiria Turei watches on as Russel Norman falls on his sword   Picture/ Felix Marwick, Twitter

A beaming Metiria Turei watches on as Russel Norman falls on his sword Picture/ Felix Marwick, Twitter

Russel Norman announced his resignation at 11am this morning in what Green sources tell me was really a bloodless coup.

Expect the male leadership role to now pass to Kevin Hague who has been plotting this move for some time.

Because of the way the Green constitution is worded this has been a bit of superb low bastardry from Kevin Hague.

Hague has consistently topped members votes in the Greens to retain his current number three spot and the Green constitution requires a vote from the members for leader…one Kevin Hague would have won easily after the Greens disappointing result in the general election.   Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

wewe

Super 8 – #WhaleRyder update – first week of training

MAHINDRA-S8SFN51_3Xsize1

1422125932188

Last Friday at the photo shoot for the Sunday Star-times I met my trainer, Henry Schuster for the first time.

Seemed like a good bastard…little did I know that the emphasis is on the second word.

He said turn up on Tuesday at the gym ready for the first day’s training.

I duly did as instructed and that is when the pain started.

Our focus right now is on fitness and core work…lots of bag work, lots of pad work, plus the core exercises. An hour and a half later I stumbled out of the gym sweating buckets hot as all hell and heading home.   Read more »

So much for consultation on land transport, just two options and none that says “nick off noddy”

So opening the mail we find that Auckland Council has put out a consultation document on the Long Term Plan.

Unbelievably they have inserted this question about paying for public transport.

IMG_2621 Read more »

The dominating minority [ some disturbing images ]

The below video is a shapshot of New Zealand’s future if we follow in the steps of Belgium or any other country that has encouraged Islamic immigration.

A few facts for you about Belgium:

  • Islam is the largest minority religion in Belgium, practiced by an estimated 6% of the total population
  •  An 2011 estimation by Belgian academic Jan Hertogen shows that more than 900,000 people have a foreign background from Islamic countries.
  • Moroccan and Turkish immigrants began coming in large numbers to Belgium starting in the 1960s as guest workers. Though the guest-worker program was abolished in 1974, many immigrants stayed and brought their families using family reunification laws. Today the Muslim community continues to grow through marriage migration. More than 60% of Moroccan and Turkish youth marry partners from their home countries.
  • Since 2009, Mohamed is the most popular given name in Brussels and Antwerp, Belgium’s two largest cities.
    In 1974, Islam was recognized as one of the subsidized religions in Belgium and the Muslim Executive of Belgium was founded in 1996. In 2006, the government gave €6.1 million (US$7.7 million) to Islamic groups.
  • There are an estimated 328-380 mosques in the country.
  • According to a 2006 opinion poll, 61% of the Belgian population thought tensions between Muslims and other communities would increase in the future.

-wiki

Read more »

Concrete Cancer Coverup, Ctd – What does the government know?

unnamed-3

You would think that with millions of tax-payers money being poured into the construction of the Manukau District Court, the Government would want to have confidence in the integrity of the building.

Following this explosive Concrete Cancer Cover-Up series on Whaleoil, government officials have had to rely on information from Rob Gaimster, the CEO of the Cement and Concrete Association of New Zealand (CCANZ).

If you listened to CCANZ, who on Monday quietly posted an update on their website, they are desperate to say that everything is all right, nothing to see here, move along.

That line didn’t work for Helen Clark.

WOBH is hearing that questions about high alkali cement problems are being raised in Wellington; not only about the potential exposure from the Manukau Court building constructed with dodgy cement from Vietnam, but whether buildings in Wellington are potentially affected.

But CAANZ seems desperate to keep digging the hole they have got themselves in, thanks in part to their support of member company Drymix.   Read more »

Is Andrea Vance miffed she wasn’t invited on the helicopter?

Andrea Vance has her knickers in a bunch over the use of a helicopter by Nick Smith to take some of the family members of Pike River victims to…and here’s the kicker…places that can only be reached by…yes your guessed…helicopter.

No-one is objecting to the source of funds.

Bernie Monk not only says its ok, he says it’s necessary

Andrea Vance needs to report what the news is, not what she would rather it was.

Cabinet minister Nick Smith has chartered another helicopter for television cameras – this time using tax-payer cash set aside for the families of the Pike River victims.

Last year Smith used $6344 of Department of Conservation money to send up a chopper for a photo opportunity with ministers Peter Dunne and Te Ururoa Flavell.

Today he was back on the West Coast for a press conference about the future of the Pike River mine site.

Families of the victims want a walking track and visitor centre to mark the place where 29 men died in 2010.   Read more »