Comment of the Day

One of our commenters makes an astute point:

Has Grant unshackled himself from the green caboose? He will have to publicly do that before Winston will talk to him in any meaningful way.

Spot on Euan.

Winston won’t do a deal with the Greens, so if he is alive at the next election Grant will need to work out how to shaft the Greens and do a deal with Winston.

Someone in the MSM should talk to Winston and find out who he reckons should be Labour leader.

Meanwhile new lefty blogger Josh Forman explains his own thoughts on Winston Peters and Labour.

With Winston Peters embarking on what is almost certainly going to be his last term in the New Zealand Parliament he is looking to secure the future of the party he founded after splitting with National in 1993 after being sacked by then PM Jim Bolger to years earlier.   Read more »

Map of the Day

Sponsored by What Power Crisis, click here for this week’s Solar Deal

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Babylonian clay tablet map.  600BCE

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“National might think it is all over. It might be just the beginning”

The NZ Herald are sitting on a pile of unused (and still stolen) Dirty Politics information, mostly the stuff that came from my emails.  When it became clear that they weren’t destroying Whaleoil, nor National, it was as if a switch was thrown – overnight, all leaks and coverage stopped.

Now that the election is over, the conundrum of how to deal with me still sits up.  They don’t just need a Cameron Slater Killer Whaleoil Killer, they need a Freed Killer as well.

But there is a much more personal reason for many Herald journos.

A number of NZ Herald journos have fallen silent after trying to frame their involvement with Dirty Politics from their perspective.  I’ve not responded to these in public in any detail – instead I’ll present the Inquiry with the evidence instead.  They can sort out the wheat from the chaff.

In the mean time, the NZ Herald have run out of people who can publicly attack me that aren’t already compromised by having been part of Dirty Politics.

It seems John Armstrong has drawn the short straw now.

National is hardly keen to resurrect the matter. The Prime Minister’s success in shooting the messenger to kill the message, National’s subsequent stunning victory at the ballot box, and the thrashing handed to Labour and that party’s post-election meltdown have pushed the contents of Dirty Politics well out of the political limelight.

The rotten smell lingers, however. And National should think seriously about acknowledging it is badly tainted and do something which shows it is genuinely cleaning up its act.

No doubt many in the party are instead quietly revelling in what comes close to state persecution of Hager for the trumped-up crime of exposing the ugly truth about the true level of National’s adherence to New Zealand’s fundamental democratic and constitutional principles. No doubt many think the party has got off relatively scot-free despite indulging in some pretty abominable behaviour.

Keep in mind that the NZ Herald are donkey deep in this as well.  They are trying their hardest to frame the issue so Dirty Politics might just, finally, take out yours truly as well as become the constant irritant for National during this term. Read more »

Taxpayers’ Union slams Joyce for his expanded corporate welfare programme

Since the opposition is asleep at the wheel the job of holding a spendthrift government to account falls upon the shoulders of the Taxpayers’ Union.

They are holding Steven Joyce to account for his expanded corporate welfare programme.

Responding to Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce’s defence of corporate welfare, Jim Rose, the author of Monopoly Money, a Taxpayers Union report on corporate welfare since 2008, says:

“Mr Joyce defends over $3 billion in subsidies to KiwiRail and Solid Energy under his watch by saying that they are state owned. Bailouts are not the role of ministers as shareholders. Since 1986, state-owned enterprises have had a statutory duty to operate as a successful business and to be as profitable and efficient as comparable businesses not owned by the Crown. The whole idea of the State Owned Enterprises Act 1986 was to bring an end to bailouts and permanent deficits.”

“Instead of putting a failed business in the hands of receivers, Mr Joyce defends throwing good money after bad by blaming the previous government for buying KiwiRail. That was three elections ago. Elections are supposed to count for something. $3 billion in taxpayers’ money cannot be handed out in subsidies with ministers bobbing and weaving about responsibility for the amount and wisdom involved. The Treasury Benches come with a full ministerial responsibility for every single dollar of taxpayers’ money spent under your watch.”    Read more »

Finally a minister who gets that driverless cars and not trains is our future

Simon Bridges appears to get it.

That our future lies in enabling technologies not restrictive technologies.

Trains are constrained by tracks and are not at all versatile, whereas driverless vehicles are enabling in many, many ways.

The prospect of cars travelling New Zealand highways with no one behind the wheel is moving closer says new Transport Minister Simon Bridges. Officials are reviewing legislation allowing for the testing of umanned autonomous vehicles on public roads.

Mr Bridges has pledged to work with environmental interests while also pursuing the Government’s road building programme.

Mr Bridges said he was committed to “a balanced approach” and ongoing investment roads were important even from a green perspective, “over time as we move to electric vehicles and autonomous vehicles”.

Mr Bridges said the Government was not doing a great deal to accommodate autonomous vehicle technology, “but I don’t think there’s any doubt that if you look at what’s going on internationally, maybe not in the next couple of years, but over time we will see driverless vehicles and that will have implications, like for example less congestion because vehicles can travel closer together”.

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Fred Morley A man carries the milk over rubble in the streets of London while firefighters battle the aftermath of the 32nd straight night of bombing.

Photo: Fred Morley
A man carries the milk over rubble in the streets of London while firefighters battle the aftermath of the 32nd straight night of bombing.

The Milk Must Get Through!!

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The House Today #nzqt

Question time/Questions for oral answer starts at 2 pm today.

Questions to Ministers

 

  1. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Deputy Prime Minister: Will he make reducing child poverty a Better Public Service target given the statement in the Speech from the Throne that his Government will continue to “have a focus on poverty, especially child poverty”?
  2. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: What will be the main features of the Government’s economic plan during this term of Parliament?
  3. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Prime Minister: How many times, since November 2008, has he spoken with blogger Cameron Slater on the phone and how many times, if any, has he texted him?
  4. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister of Building and Housing: Does he agree with the statement from the Speech from the Throne that the Government will “have a focus on housing in this Parliamentary term. More special housing areas will be created – and therefore more new housing developed – as a result of Housing Accords signed between the Government and local councils”?
  5. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister for Building and Housing:What advice has he received on the monthly rate of new house builds from when this Government was first elected in 2008 and the current rate? Read more »

Thank goodness David Parker knows why Labour lost

It’s too red.

I kid you not.  Parker thinks the colour of the party logo is a problem.

After you realise he’s not being ‘interviewed’ by The Civilian, and you think he’s done being ridiculous, he’s also called Labour cult-like.

Labour leadership contender David Parker says Labour borders on feeling like “a cult” and must look at its branding – including its symbolic red party colour.

Mr Parker made the comments in an interview with the Herald as part of a series on the four leadership contenders.

He said part of the overhaul as Labour tried to recover from its damaging election loss should include its branding, which was the shopfront of the party most noticeable to the public.

“At the moment I think we present ourselves in the Labour Party as so … well, some of our imagery is so clearly ‘Labour red’. Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Someone phone the Herald and help them over their denial

Adam, the election is over.  Time to accept it.

qweq