*** Whaleoil BEANIE update ***

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I’m told the Merchandising team have put them all into NZ Post bags and they will be put into the delivery system tomorrow (Friday).  I would expect the majority to get to you by Tuesday at the latest, some of you who live under (or near) a rock might have to cope with Wednesday.

One person ordered one but never paid.  That person should not expect one.  But you can email me or orders@whale… and sort that out so we can get it to you after all.

Thanks for your support again.  This is a really positive way to support Whaleoil.

– Pete and the Merchandising Team

Thursday nightCap

Give it at least 2 minutes before giving up…

Mandatory watching.  Make sure you have 17 uninterrupted minutes.  You will not be able to turn away.

Sir Nicholas Winton

Sir Nicholas Winton who organised the rescue and passage to Britain of about 669 mostly Jewish Czechoslovakian children destined for the Nazi death camps before World War II in an operation known as the Czech Kindertransport. This video is the BBC Programme “That’s Life” aired in 1988.

He never told his wife about it.

Winton kept quiet about his humanitarian exploits for many years, until his wife Grete found a detailed scrapbook in their attic in 1988. It contained lists of the children, including their parents’ names and the names and addresses of the families that took them in. By sending letters to these addresses, 80 of “Winton’s children” were found in Britain.  – Wikipedia

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Today’s Trivia

china_beach

 

Welcome to Daily Trivia. There is a game to play here. The photo above relates to one of the items below. The first reader to correctly tell us in the comments what item the photo belongs to, and why, gets bragging rights. Sometimes they are obvious, other times the obvious answer is the decoy. Can you figure it out tonight?

When Grand Duke William III of Luxembourg died in 1890, he was succeeded by Adolphe, his 17th cousin once removed (through the male line); this is the greatest distance among two consecutive rulers in history. (source)

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Perfect Wrongly Wrongson v Whaleoil metaphor

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Always felt torturing your own kids was essential

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Daily Roundup

LkhCReE

Where are the other 142?

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Whaleoil Backchat

Good Evening, Welcome To The Daily Whaleoil Backchat.

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Just email [email protected] with your concerns.  Please be polite and as precise as you can be.  Remember: this is a volunteer service provided by other Whaleoil readers.  Only contact them with commenting related problems.

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If only Simon Bridges could boast of a record like Scott Walker’s

Simon Bridges is touted as a future leader of the National party. But what are his credentials?

At the moment it appears that his sole qualification is that he looks charming.

If, however he could match Scott Walker’s achievements, especially in destroying unions, then he might have a chance.

The source of Walker’s appeal—his singular calling card, in fact—is not hard to identify. In 2011, the governor signed legislation stripping most of Wisconsin’s public-sector unions of their rights to collective bargaining and to require dues from members, essentially busting those unions. He went on to survive a bitter 2012 recall effort backed by national unions and to win reelection in 2014 in a state Barack Obama won in 2012. He then signed “right-to-work” legislation that massively undercut the state’s dwindling private-sector unions, too. In his twenty-minute CPAC speech, Walker referred to his battles with labor six times directly and as many times indirectly. It is the core of his message.

Scott Walker has been extremely successful at union busting.

In his CPAC speech and subsequent ones, Walker likened his clash with Wisconsin’s public-sector unions to Ronald Reagan’s 1981 firing of 11,000 striking air traffic controllers, thus presenting himself as a rightful heir of the party’s patron saint. He extended that connection to foreign policy. A few days after his CPAC speech, Walker told a Palm Beach Club for Growth audience that Reagan’s firing of the controllers was “the most significant foreign policy decision of my lifetime” because “it sent a message around the world [that] we weren’t to be messed with.” Walker’s similar toughness under fire with the unions, in other words, makes him ready to be commander in chief. “If I can take on 100,000 protesters,” he told the crowd at CPAC, “I can do the same across the world.” The mainstream press treated such comparisons as bumbling efforts to cover the fact that, as a governor and former county executive, he has scant foreign policy experience. But conservative audiences loved the show of resolution. Walker wants tough strength to be his calling card; his campaign book is called, not coincidentally, Unintimidated.

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One of Steve Joyce’s corporate welfare darlings is making headlines

Rocket Lab is a US company, but in all publicity here in New Zealand, especially when it is about their corporate welfare they are described as a Auckland based company.

The reality is different, even Bloomberg knows they are a US company.

New Zealand, known for breathtaking scenery and fine wine, will add one more claim to fame when it becomes home to the world’s first commercial space-launch site later this year.

A U.S. company, Rocket Lab plans to build a base on New Zealand’s South Island from which to loft small satellites into low orbit. The goal is to increase the pace and affordability of sending up imaging and communication gear used for services including weather monitoring, natural disaster management and crop surveillance.

“Creating and operating our own launch site is a necessity to meet the demands of our growing customer manifest,” Chief Executive Officer Peter Beck said Wednesday. “With the launch frequency possible from this site, Rocket Lab is one major step closer to its goal of making space commercially accessible.”    Read more »