Map of the Day

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Nuclear Power plants in Europe

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A look inside North Korea

Photographs taken from inside North Korea give a rare glimpse of everyday life for residents living inside the notorious hermit kingdom.

Two Associated Press photojournalists, Eric Talmadge and David Guttenfelder, were granted unprecedented access to travel across the country – while accompanied by a minder at all times, of course.

Their photos from the trip provide some insight into life as a citizen in the North and come in stark contrast to the propaganda released by the state, where leader Kim Jong-un invariably takes centre stage.

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Doug Sellman still whinging

Doug Sellman just doesn’t get it.

He has had a good long whinge in the Sunday Star-Times today.

He seems to think that freedom of speech only applies to him and that he should be free from criticism.share

He also gives Rod Oram a good old reach around, echoing Oram’s claims that I am somehow responsible for suppression freedom of expression when it is him who is seeking to have me, and Carrick Graham and now Katherine Rich silenced.

The fools should really look in the mirror.

But since he keeps on claiming that I am trying to suppress his idea we really should look at those ideas that he is pushing. Then you can see why it is that I push back against idiots like Doug Sellman and the stupid taxpayer funded ideas that they peddle.

And continue to run them we will, especially when idiots like Doug Sellman run off at the mouth claiming:

Not Avondale… not the Islamic centre… It couldn’t be a coincidence, could it?

Radio Live reports

Investigations are underway after a fire at the Auckland Islamic Centre in Avondale overnight.

The blaze broke out around 2:40am this morning, six trucks attended, and it took about an hour to get the fire under control.

Investigators will be back at the mosque on Tait St today to try to determine the cause.

It is believed no one was hurt.

This wouldn’t happen to be the same Auckland Islamic Centre where all the other newsworthy jihad and assault stories originated, would it?

Is Avondale New Zealand’s Birmingham?   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Shane Thoms

Photo: Shane Thoms

Hung-over at the Abandoned Strip Club in a Tiny Japanese Village

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NZ’s Rolf Harris, in a defiant interview with the Herald on Sunday, says he has no remorse

No remorse.  He’s admitted to doing it.  He just pretends it was consensual.

The Herald on Sunday allows NZ’s Rolf Harris to put forward his story, even though none of us are allowed to know who he is.

The man told the Herald on Sunday he had apologised to his wife and their children. “This has almost destroyed my marriage. My daughter and son don’t really talk to me.

They think I am a crim.”

Well there you go then Rolf.  The people who are closest to you and love you can see you are a crim.  You seem to be the only one in total denial.

Physically it had taken a toll on his health. “I’m on pills for high blood pressure. I could hardly lift my arm at one stage. I put on 10kg in six months,” he said.

And fighting the case had also left the family with “huge financial issues”, adding “half my life savings” had been spent.

Despite name suppression, many people were aware of his identity and he was struggling to get work.

“I just actually lost out on a job – I was working for this company but there was a piece about this woman’s husband screaming abuse at me. One of the shareholders of the company who lives in Dunedin said, ‘I can’t employ you’,” he said.

In recent times he said he had resorted to applying for “menial jobs”.

He had also had “rapist” spray-painted on a wall outside his home.

The man blamed the massive life upheaval, for himself and his family, on “20 seconds of madness”.

“It was the moment of madness … I don’t know what came over me,” he said.

Well.  Actually Rolf, what came over you was exactly the same as what came over you all the previous times with women who have not laid complaints.   It’s as simple as that.   Read more »

Bollocks

Another abuse of the name suppression law

The Solicitor-General is considering appealing the name suppression granted to an Auckland businessman convicted for trading in what a judge described as “gross and objectionable” child-abuse images.

The man, known in court as Q, admitted his guilt in June, was denied suppression, and began serving 10 months’ home detention away from his family.

But the battle over his identity continued until earlier this month when he was granted permanent name suppression by the High Court.

Q persuaded Justice Susan Thomas to grant suppression by citing medical evidence to suggest his wife was at risk of dying from a stress-related heart condition if he were named.

The Sensible Sentencing Trust and advocacy group Stop Demand have both written to the Solicitor-General urging him to consider an appeal. A spokesman for the Solicitor-General’s office confirmed the matter was still under consideration and no decision date had been set.

An experienced criminal lawyer told the Sunday Star-Times the decision was a “precedent-setter”.

“Every offender with a mum with a dicky heart will be citing this decision from now on.”

Not just that.  Family might develop depression.  Might end up suicidal.  Neighbours might live in fear.  And so on.  If people’s names can’t be known because they are such a threat to public health, you can justify any kind of name suppression.   Read more »

How’s that socialism thing going for Venezuela?

How’s that socialism thing going for Venezuela?

Not so well apparently.

Amid worsening shortages, Venezuela recently reached a milestone of dubious distinction: It has joined the ranks of North Korea and Cuba in rationing food for its citizens.

On a recent, muggy morning, Maria Varge stood in line outside a Centro 99 grocery store, ready to scour the shelves for scarce items like cooking oil and milk. But before entering, Ms. Varge had to scan her fingerprint to ensure she wouldn’t buy more than her share.

Despite its technological twist on the old allotment booklet, Venezuela’s new program of rationing is infuriating consumers who say it creates tiresome waits, doesn’t relieve shortages and overlooks the far-reaching economic overhauls the country needs to resolve the problem.

“These machines make longer lines,” said Ms. Varge, 50, as she was jostled by people in line, “but you get inside, and they still don’t have what you want.”   Read more »

Selfish fat bastard overflows seat and forces other passenger to stand

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Fat bastards who overflow airline seats should be made to pay extra.

I mean you are charged for excess baggage but not for excess guts.

A passenger has complained to an airline after she was squeezed out of her seat by an obese man – and forced to spend most of a trans-Tasman flight standing in the aisle.

Caralyn Young, of Tawa, says she was crammed in next to the man on the fully booked flight from Brisbane to Wellington last Monday night.  Read more »

Price steering. Heard of it?

Are you a rich prick?  Or at least, do you have the best phone, iPad or crappy computer?  In that case, you might be paying more for things online than others.

It’s no secret that advertising is often targeted to online users, but it may surprise you to learn the extent to which pricing is also personalised.

According to a study by computer scientists at Northeastern University, many major e-commerce sites personalize prices per customer, depending on what software they use or their browser history.

The difference in costs can be as large as ten per cent, and most sites don’t even warn you when they are using price steering techniques.

One of the culprits guilty of ‘price discrimination’ – customizing the prices of products – is travel-booking website Orbitz.

Researchers found that users who are logged onto the Orbitz website are charged an average of $12 less than those who are not logged on.

The same goes for online travel services company CheapTickets. Neither CheapTickets nor Orbitz tells customers that prices alter depending on the user.

Websites also discriminate based on what devices customers are logged onto. For example, Travelocity offers an unspoken $15 discount for people using Apple’s iOS operating system.

Home Depot, on the other hand, suggests products that are about $100 more expensive to customers using a mobile device, as opposed to those on a desktop computer.

I’ve had it before when looking at a web site and talking with the Mrs who then also pulls it up, only to find the price is different.   Read more »