Deputy Adern: a tactical error, arrogance or the first sign of incompetence?

Unlike the party leader who is elected by the unions, membership and the caucus, Labour’s deputy leader is always selected by the caucus.

Jacinda Ardern may emerge as Labour deputy leader whoever wins the race for the top job, but her nomination as Grant Robertson’s running mate is seen as a risk because the deputy’s job may be useful in reconciling the rival camps.

The Wellington Central MP nominated Ardern as his preferred deputy on Sunday, but his main rivals have signalled they will not name a favoured deputy.

Former president Andrew Little, who made the early running in the tight race, said he would not promise any role to anyone. Acting leader David Parker said he would ‘‘stand on my own two feet’’.

Caucus spokeswoman Annette King said that, unlike the leadership, the choice of deputy was determined by the party’s MPs alone.

That could potentially stymie Robertson’s choice – although it is unlikely the caucus would make such a blatant challenge to a new leader – or see her elected deputy whoever wins.

However, one party source yesterday said Robertson’s move was risky because the deputy’s role could be a useful olive branch to help unify the caucus after the run-offs.

Here’s the problem:  Robertson is said to have only 12 supporters within caucus.  If the remainder do not support Ardern, even in the event Robertson wins, the caucus can install its own thorn in Robertson’s side.  Someone like Parker, or Little, for example.   Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Not sure channelling Pauline Hanson is a winner, Jacinda dear

350657-pauline-hanson

Jacinda Ardern working like a navvy in the chippy

It appears that Jacinda Ardern is a little sensitive about her one page CV and lack of real world experience.

She has gone all snippy and declared that she is just like Pauline Hansen from Australia and has worked in a fish and chip shop.

Labour MP Jacinda Ardern has rejected a “beltway babies” jibe, saying she’s “worked longer in a fish and chip shop than as a parliamentary staffer”.

Ardern has thrown her support behind Grant Robertson’s party leadership bid, with Robertson saying he wanted her as deputy leader should he win.

The deputy is decided by the caucus, but the MP recommended by the leader is often chosen.

The other leadership contenders – David Parker, Andrew Little and Nanaia Mahuta – have ruled out picking a deputy before the leadership vote in mid-November.

At an event in Auckland yesterday, Wellington Central MP Robertson announced Ardern was his pick for deputy should he become leader.

“She connects with a broad range of New Zealanders, lives and breathes our values, and has driven bold and new policy for children,” he said.

“I would be proud to serve with her.”   Read more »

Speaker cops it on day one

via zimbio.com

via zimbio.com

MPs were reminded that today was about ceremony.  John Key got criticised for cracking a joke at the expense of the Labour Party, but somehow (not surprisingly), Russel Norman once again failed to observe the occasion and got stuck in

David Carter was re-elected Speaker in a vote prompted by the fact returning NZ First MP Ron Mark was put forward by his Leader Winston Peters.

Mr Mark later indicated his nomination came as something of a surprise.

Mr Carter’s re-election was welcomed by Prime Minister John Key but Acting Labour Leader David Parker and Greens Co-leader Russel Norman had some requests for him.

“There will be contentious moments in this House”, Mr Parker said in his address to Mr Carter.

“The business of Opposition and the business of Government are both very important roles we are reliant on you giving us a fair go.” Read more »

TV/radio coverage of Parliament today starts now

Parliament opens today.

Click here to watch online, or view other viewing/listening options.

Narrated by Jim Moira, it seems.

weerw

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National all rhetoric on housing, but little is delivered

How the government got through the election without this particular policy failure biting them in the bum is beyond me.

It’s been revealed the Government’s flagship housing policy has delivered just five homes in its first year.

And in a week where Auckland’s house prices reached a record high, the Government’s strategy has been labelled an utter failure by the Opposition.

The Government last year promised to get on top of Auckland’s housing crisis by building new subdivisions. Tens of thousands of homes would be built in fast-tracked zones called special housing areas.

“We know this has been a problem that’s been around for 30 to 40 years, it’s not going to develop overnight and it’s not going to be fixed overnight,” says Prime Minister John Key.

Granted, Len Brown and his band of merry troughers have a large part to play.  But five houses?  The private sector could have put up 5 houses.  It is a terrible result, and one that needs turning around.

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Key signals SAS involvement in ISIS theatre

SAS-Baddass

Hand up who didn’t see this coming?   Patrick Gower reports

 

Prime Minister John Key says Kiwi troops going into Iraq as trainers is a real possibility. It would follow Australia’s lead, which is sending its SAS as advisors.

Any day now Australia’s SAS will be back in Iraq to help the fight against Islamic State militants after Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop flew into Baghdad to get final sign-off on their role “to advise and assist the Iraqi government in building up the capacity of the Iraqi Security Forces”.

“Training is definitely an option,” says Mr Key.

“Training”.

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Good point John, but those whingers don’t vote for ya

The people who whinge about affordable housing and the fact they can’t afford to buy their million dollar house are probably not National voters.

John Key has given some sound but unpalatable advice for these whingers who have been brought up thinking the world owes them a living, or at the very least a million dollar house next to where their parents lived so they can dump the grand kids every time they want to go out to the swanky restaurants that infest their neighbourhood.

First home buyers in Auckland might have to consider an apartment in order to get onto the property ladder, Prime Minister John Key says.

His comments follow the release of new CVs for Auckland, which have soared since 2011, particularly in city-fringe suburbs.

There are fears the mostly higher CVs could lead to rates increases well in excess of the 3.7 per cent planned for homeowners by Mayor Len Brown next year.

The latest figures show CVs across the city have risen an average of 34 per cent since 2011, and in Hobsonville a whopping 65 per cent.

Mr Key told TVNZ’s Breakfast show today the valuations reflected what had been happening in Auckland over the past three years.   Read more »

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Gracinda? Someone needs to tell them they’re dreamin’

Ok so the name that they’ve come up with for a gay man and childless single woman to lead Labour is…”Gracinda”.

I mean seriously?

These people with single page CVs of nothing jobs and a lifetime in the trough are wanting to lead a party called “Labour”…I doubt either of them have ever had a callous on their hands from using a shovel or doing some other sort of “Labour”.

Bryce Edwards is drinking the Koolaid.

The dynamic duo of Grant Robertson and Jacinda Ardern – now termed ‘Gracinda’ on social media – could well be the Labour Party’s best bet for recovering from its 2014 electoral nadir. The two are probably the most dynamic of the leadership candidates on offer, and have real talent. There will be a strong temptation among the membership to choose their ‘new generation’ message. But there are also some major problems with putting ‘Camp Robertson’ in charge of Labour. While they might have more style than their counterparts, some commentators are pointing to their lack of substance as being a worry for the party’s future.

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The Huddle

newstalkzb

Last night Susan Wood sat in for Larry Williams to do The Huddle with Jock Anderson and myself.

Our topics were:

  • Labour Leadership race
  • Parliament swearing in, but grumbles about allegiance to the Queen rather than Te Tiriti
  • Australia has backed off its anti-burqa law

Read more »