Cringeworthy

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Rural News, taking the high road, and one person ruining it for all

You may recall the piece about “The Hound” in the Rural News doing an ad hominem attack on me.  They disagree, so I’m scum.  I work with people they don’t like, so I’m scum.  My readers are inbreds, so I’m scum.

It is done that way because smearing works.   And it’s typical behaviour from the domain of people who are losing – they don’t want to argue the point, they want to shut you down.

Some of you took to your keyboards to tell them what you thought of them.

> From: a concerned person <[email protected]>
> Subject: Morons
> Date: 3 March 2015 9:02:16 pm NZDT
> To: <[email protected]>
> Reply-To: a concerned person <[email protected]>
>
> Sender details: Read more »

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Even Rudman understands why Labour shouldn’t run in Northland

It seems everyone except Andrew Little understands why Labour shouldn’t have run in Northland.

Brian Rudman lays off bludging for a new theatre to point this out.

On National Radio yesterday, Labour leader Andrew Little was talking up his candidate’s chances, and questioning Mr Peters’ electoral appeal. In his position, it was the only thing he could do. He said Ms Prime “has a profile and understanding you might not see sitting in Wellington or Auckland”.

Rather desperately he added that “Labour has always struggled to get good numbers there” but “circumstances may well have changed and [she] may well be in with a chance”.That seems highly unlikely. Since the seat was created in 1996 it has been solidly National. At last September’s general election, National’s Mike Sabin, whose sudden resignation for undisclosed personal reasons triggered the present contest, scored 18,269 votes to Ms Prime’s 8969. The party vote gap was even wider, National on 17,412, Labour, 5913. New Zealand First, with no candidate, was close to Labour on 4546.

Then there is the strategic implications of placating Winston and changing the dynamics of parliament.

He says Mr Peters endorsed Kelvin Davis, Labour’s winning candidate, in the Maori seat of Te Tai Tokerau last election and now Labour should return the favour. He reckons the New Zealand First leader, who has family connections in the North, is the only person who, “on a good day”, could win the safe seat off National and create all sorts of turmoil for the Government.   Read more »

Hundreds of birds fried with latest “green” power project in the US

crescent-011

When “green” power solutions aren’t shredding birds with wind turbines they are frying them with massive subsidised concentrated solar arrays.

It’s no secret that solar power is hot right now, with innovators and big name companies alike putting a great deal of time, money, and effort into improving these amazing sources of renewable energy. Still, the last thing you’d likely expect is for a new experimental array to literally light nearly 130 birds in mid-flight on fire.

And yet, that’s exactly what happened near Tonopah, Nevada last month during tests of the 110-megawatt Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project.

According to Rudy Evenson, Deputy Chief of Communications for Nevada Bureau of Land Management (NBLM) in Reno, as reported by Re Wire, a third of the newly constructed plant was put into action on the morning of Jan. 14, redirecting concentrated solar energy to a point 1,200 feet above the ground.

Unfortunately, about two hours into the test, engineers and biologists on site started noticing “streamers” – trails of smoke and steam caused by birds flying directly into the field of solar radiation. What moisture was on them instantly vaporized, and some instantly burst into flames – at least, until they began to frantically flap away. An estimated 130 birds were injured or killed during the test.

[…]    Read more »

Heh

My RSS reader regularly matches the wrong image with the story.  Today, they win the Internet

eqweqew

Mental Health Break

Is Buzzfeed the most important news organisation in the world?

Quite possibly it is.

Of course mainstream journalists will scoff at Buzzfeed but it is undeniably successful in ways that the editors at Fairfax and the NZ Herald can only dream of.

Why is that?

Let’s look at the past paradigm…which ironically is still the current paradigm in the mainstream.

Like a great many such things, some of journalism’s most precious ideals were the happy result of geography and economics. That is, in any given geography, the dominant newspaper tended towards a natural monopoly for two reasons:

  • When it came to costs, the ownership of expensive printing presses and distribution channels made entrance difficult for potential competitors
  • As for revenue, broad-based advertising, at least in the pre-targeting era, naturally flowed to the channel with the greatest reach

The interaction of these two economic realities made newspapers fabulously profitable and veritable cash machines; the editorial side, meanwhile, freed from the responsibility to directly make money, could instead focus on things like far-flung bureaus, investigative journalism that in many cases took months to develop, and a clear separation between the business and editorial sides of a newspaper. The latter was important not just for the avoidance of blatant corruption, but also because it imbued the editorial side with a certain responsibility to focus on stories that deserved to be written because they mattered, not because they were sensationalistic.

This last point was best exemplified by The New York Times’ famous slogan, “All the news that’s fit to print” and by the paper’s legendary Page One meetings where editors would pitch stories for inclusion on the most valuable real estate in journalism. It’s important to appreciate that this was more than just a slogan and meeting; there are important assumptions underlying this conceit:

  • The first assumption is that there is a limited amount of space, which in the case of a physical product is quite obviously true. Sure, newspapers could and did change the length of their daily editions, but the line had to be drawn somewhere
  • The second assumption is that journalists, by choosing what to write about, are the arbiters of what is “news”
  • The third assumption is that the front page is an essential signal as to what news is important; more broadly, it’s an assumption that editors matter

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Map of the Day

Sponsored by What Power Crisis, click here for this week’s Solar Deal


PotatoYield

International Potato Production


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Panty sniffers

Nathan_panty_sniffer

Panty sniffer number one has a thing for American government employees’ underwear. He just can’t get enough of it. The more he sniffs the more he is shocked that skid marks not only exist but in some cases are downright disgusting. He considers that he is doing the American public a service by revealing the details, ( the dirty, smelly details ). He rejects the title ‘Panty Sniffer’ which suggests that he is in some way perverted for having a fixation with other people’s underwear and that he is a criminal for rooting around in other peoples dirty laundry searching for stains and other unsavory marks.

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People are stupid and annoying and I hate you all

stupidpeople

A friend sent me this list of things that are annoying about how “hell is other people“.

I can identify strongly with this.

1. When you’re sitting by yourself in a public place and someone sits next to you, your first instinct is great. I hope they don’t start talking to me.

2. Then they start talking and you’re like, FUCK.

3. They’re blah blahing about their day while you silently wonder who you pissed off recently to warrant this kind of karmic retribution.

Bottom line is I don’t play well with others and don’t see why I should.

I hate going to shopping centres because there are stupid people doing stupid things and I have to tell them, they get upset for some reason like it is a revelation to them that they are stupid. They already think I am a rude person so I can’t fathom a reason as to why I should dis-abuse them of that notion.  Read more »