Friday NightCap

Times Square tourist hustle

Caution:  adult themes

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Today’s Trivia

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Welcome to Daily Trivia. There is a game to play here. The photo above relates to one of the items below. The first reader to correctly tell us in the comments what item the photo belongs to, and why, gets bragging rights. Sometimes they are obvious, other times the obvious answer is the decoy. Can you figure it out tonight?

1,440,871 acres of the Amazon rainforest was destroyed in 2015, which is approximately 120,072 acres per month or 3947 acres per day. (Source)

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Daily dose of Awww careful now

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Old tech isn’t always inferior

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Daily Roundup

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Latest news headlines from Reuters

Seymour on National’s backward slide on property rights

A reader noted that Whaleoil has been doing “hits” on the government a lot lately. Some attribute that to my dislike of John Key. Others think I’m being petulant.

Not so. National is slowly but surely drifting away from the core principles it is meant to promote and defend.

With an election looming where voters are getting tired of National, but can’t stomach Labour (just yet), National need to protect their own voter base lest it be diluted by people moving their “protest” vote to ACT and NZ First.

 

Socialism is a great social experiment…that ends in misery

Venezuela is collapsing as their grand socialist experiment crashes and burns.

The fight for food has begun in Venezuela. On any day, in cities across this increasingly desperate nation, crowds form to sack supermarkets. Protesters take to the streets to decry the skyrocketing prices and dwindling supplies of basic goods. The wealthy improvise, some shopping online for food that arrives from Miami. Middle-class families make do with less: coffee without milk, sardines instead of beef, two daily meals instead of three. The poor are stripping mangoes off the trees and struggling to survive.

“This is savagery,” said Pedro Zaraza, a car-oil salesman who watched a mob mass on Friday outside a supermarket, where it was eventually dispersed by the army. “The authorities are losing their grip.”

What has been a slow-motion crisis in Venezuela seems to be careening into a new, more dangerous phase. The long economic decline of the country with the world’s largest oil reserves now shows signs of morphing into a humanitarian emergency, with government mismanagement and low petroleum prices leading to widespread shortages and inflation that could surpass 700 percent this year.

When there is a power vacuum people generally die hard.

The political stakes are mounting. Exhausted by government-imposed power blackouts, spiraling crime, endless food lines, shortages of medicine and waves of looting and protest, citizens are mobilizing against their leaders. In recent days, Venezuelans lined up to add their names to a recall petition that aims to bring down the country’s president, Nicolás Maduro, and put an end to the socialist-inspired “revolution” ignited 17 years ago by Hugo Chávez.

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