Chisholm Inquiry: NZ Herald undermined Adam Feeley

Yes here is a headline you won’t read in the NZ Herald.

I will let the report speak for itself.

IMG_5385 Read more »

Inquiry shows New Media PR here to stay

Media Statement: Carrick Graham

 

25 November 2014: 12:45pm

 

INQUIRY SHOWS NEW MEDIA PR HERE TO STAY

 

Facilitate Communications welcomes the Prime Minister’s release of the Inquiry report into allegations regarding the Honourable Judith Collins and a former Director of the Serious Fraud Office, Adam Feeley.

 

The Inquiry by former High Court Judge Justice Chisholm has exonerated our client Mark Hotchin from any attempt to undermine the then head of the Serious Fraud Office Mr Adam Feeley,” said Carrick Graham, Managing Director of Facilitate Communications.

 

“Reputation management today involves utilising all sources of media, especially social media platforms that allow enhanced control over the message delivery,” said Mr Graham.   Read more »

Collins exonerated, title restored, now put her back in cabinet

As expected Judith Collins has been exonerated by the Chisholm inquiry. The fit up job on her has failed.

Former minister Judith Collins has been cleared of allegations she was involved in a smear campaign against former Serious Fraud Office (SFO) chief executive Adam Feeley.

In a report released today, Justice Lester Chisholm found there were “efforts” to undermine Feeley by two separate groups, but there was no evidence to suggest Collins was part of that.

The first group was made up of some current and some former staff of the Serious Fraud Office. A second group comprised right-wing bloggers Cameron Slater, Cathy Odgers and lobbyist Carrick Graham, with Slater taking the leading role in that group.

“Except for her association with Mr Slater, Ms Collins was not involved in the activities of these groups,” Chisholm’s report finds.

An email dated in 2011 from Slater, obtained and released by Prime Minister John Key, implicated Collins in the smear against her own official, saying she had been “gunning” for Feeley.

Collins resigned a few weeks before the election, insisting she would clear her name, and Key called an inquiry.

Slater countered by lodging a privacy complaint against the prime minister for disclosing a personal email. Key has since apologised to Slater for releasing the email, but said he stood by his actions.

The email indicated Feeley may have been the target of a campaign to undermine him involving two bloggers, Cathy Odgers and Slater, and seemingly endorsed by Collins. At the time, Collins was overseeing the SFO, and the State Services Commission was investigating Feeley’s actions.   Read more »

Trotter on John Key’s history lesson

Chris Trotter isn’t taking the lefty stance of mocking John Key’s version of history after the stupid Waitangi Tribunal decision.

THE PRIME MINISTER, John Key, has been much mocked over the past week for his claim that New Zealand was settled peacefully. Hoots of derision have echoed through the Twittersphere from those who profess to know their New Zealand history a great deal better than the Prime Minister.

Are they right? Is Mr Key wrong?

It might help to place the Prime Minister’s comments in context. His remarks followed the Waitangi Tribunal finding that the tribal chieftains of the far-North did not cede sovereignty to the British Crown when they signed the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840.

This finding is considerably more controversial than anything the Prime Minister decided to offer by way of commentary. The Auckland-based historian, Paul Moon, has already derided the Tribunal’s historical conclusions, and his intervention is unlikely to be the last.

The tribunal’s decision will likely be ignored.

A crucial element of the settled view is that the Maori chieftains who signed the Treaty, many of whom had enjoyed long and mutually beneficial relationships with the Europeans who had taken up residence in New Zealand since Cook’s exploratory voyages of the late eighteenth century, knew exactly what they were agreeing to at Waitangi on 6 February 1840.

Captain William Hobson was guaranteeing them the inviolability of their traditional territories and the safety of their people. In the light of what had befallen the iwi and hapu of Niu Tirani (New Zealand) between 1769 and 1840, the existential value of these guarantees is readily appreciated.

The indigenous population of these islands at the time of first European contact is estimated at 100,000. Between 1800 and 1830 as many as 30,000 Maori were killed and/or driven from their traditional lands by enemy iwi and hapu armed with the devastating military technology of the Pakeha. The protection of Queen Victoria (symbolising the world’s most powerful nation) was what they needed. Hobson offered it. The chiefs grabbed it with both hands.    Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Luis Sinco  Taken during the November 2004 battle in Fallujah, Iraq and published in over 150 newspapers in the same month, the photograph above shows Marine Lance Corporal James Blake Miller, tired and bloodied, a newly lit cigarette in his mouth, gazing away from the camera.

Photo: Luis Sinco
Taken during the November 2004 battle in Fallujah, Iraq and published in over 150 newspapers in the same month, the photograph above shows Marine Lance Corporal James Blake Miller, tired and bloodied, a newly lit cigarette in his mouth, gazing away from the camera.

The Marlboro Marine

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The House Today #nzqt

Question time/Questions for oral answer starts at 2 pm today.

Questions to Ministers

  1. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  2. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received confirming the economy is continuing to grow and that this growth is supporting more jobs and higher incomes?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement regarding the release of NZSIS documents to Cameron Slater that “The basic claim that somehow my office was either pressuring the system, speeding up the process, injecting itself in the process, all of that is flatly incorrect, the inspector when she goes and does her work and looks at it, will, I’m totally confident demonstrate that”?
  4. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Trade: What progress has been made on negotiations towards a free-trade agreement with South Korea?
  5. Hon PHIL GOFF to the Prime Minister: Does he take responsibility for his office staff passing on information obtained from the NZSIS to Cameron Slater in 2011 for political purposes? Read more »

Of course they are opposed to a referendum

Auckland Council and Len brown are running at a hundred miles an hour away from giving citizens of Auckland a say on how they want to tax us for using roads we have already paid for.

Auckland Council staff are opposing a public referendum on whether to charge motorway tolls or raise fuel taxes and rates to fill a multibillion-dollar transport funding gap as allegedly too costly and confusing.

An Auckland-wide referendum on ways of raising an extra $300 million a year would cost $1.5 million and the timetable for running it ahead of long-term budget decisions needed by early May would be very tight, says a staff report to councillors.

The report, which councillors will consider on Thursday, also says a referendum would not replace the council’s obligation to consult on transport funding options before setting its 10-year budget.

Running two processes asking about the same issue was likely to be “confusing for Aucklanders.”

It says a consultation document for the budget will be delivered to each household for feedback in any case, and recommends a “statistically reliable and independent” survey if councillors want greater clarity about public opinion after that.

Auckland Mayor Len Brown opposed the idea of a referendum last month, when an advisory group presented the council with options of either a motorway toll averaging $2 or higher fuel taxes and rates, saying he expected tens of thousands of people to make their views clear in submissions to the long-term budget.    Read more »

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Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Jihadi attacks worse threat than IRA

Britain is facing an ‘almost inevitable’ attack by fanatics who have been ‘militarised’ by Islamic State, according to police and security officials.

In speeches today, Theresa May and senior police will warn that the ‘diverse’ terrorist threat posed by jihadis returning from Syria and Iraq is one of the greatest this country has ever faced.

Potential attacks could range from a ‘lone wolf’ beheading in a crowded shopping centre or street, to a bomb plot using fertiliser stolen from British farms. One Whitehall official told the Mail: ‘It is almost inevitable that something is going to happen in the next few months.’

It is really a civil war when your own neighbours can be motivated to take up arms, or detonate a bomb against your family, friends and children in the name of Allah and a bunch of idiots running around killing everyone in the Middle East.

According to Britain’s most senior officer, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, police and MI5 have already foiled five major plots this year. Chillingly, there is normally only one major plot disrupted every 12 months.

Addressing a conference in London, Mrs May will unveil draconian new laws to try to protect the public and stem the flow of cash and recruits to Islamic State. They include a ban on the payment of any ransoms to terrorists and making it easier to track extremists on the internet.

Internet companies will be forced to keep data which helps to identify the user of an individual mobile phone or computer. But the law stops short of making them log every website a person visits after the Liberal Democrats said the so-called ‘snoopers’ charter’ was ‘dead and buried’.

The Home Secretary’s new Anti-Terrorism and Security Bill, to be presented to MPs tomorrow, also includes powers to:

  • Forcibly relocate terror suspects, or put them into internal exile; allow border guards to seize the passports of suspected jihadis;
  • Ban fanatics returning from Syria from entering the UK for up to two years;
  • Forbid airlines from landing in the UK if they do not provide advanced passenger lists.

Sir Bernard said the challenges faced by police and MI5 in monitoring jihadis returning from Syria were huge.

He warned: ‘They’re going to be militarised, they will have a complex web of people that they know, and of course they will have learnt tactics that they may want to use here.’

Meanwhile, here in New Zealand, the Green Taliban are busy trying to undermine our national security.    Read more »

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NOTICE: Slater to follow Goff [UPDATED]

Sean Plunket will interview Phil Goff around 10:20, and Cameron Slater will follow around 10:35

Listen Live Online.  UPDATED:  Or now, listen to it here.