It’s time for a new kind of Labour leader

Nice graph by Stuff today

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Credit: Stuff. MMP line added by Whaleoil

 

With the leadership again up for grabs, the figures show that when Labour appoints a leader while in opposition it takes the party an average of 4.6 years to regain power. That would put its recovery beyond the 2017 election and closer to 2020.

That’s statistical analysis.  That doesn’t take into account that Labour are now 6 years on from a Clark defeat and are still feverishly holding on to politicians that started their careers in the 80s and 90s.

The Clark 3 term stretch was quite the anomaly, and although fresh in our minds, it was unusual for the country to allow such a shift to the left for such a long time.     Read more »

Green Party East Coast candidate goes super nasty in a Gisborne Herald article

The tears of impotent rage are still flowing from the Green Party after the voters gave them such a spanking Sue Bradford would also want to make it illegal.

When commenting in The Gisborne Herald about how the voters walked away from the left in droves on September 20, East Coast Green Party candidate Gavan McLean had this to say:

How do we explain the extraordinary lack of support for those who care? It’s not just the number of non-voters; not just the media, some almost falling over in their lean to the right; not just the demeaning circus of shouting matches called “debates”, or the subsequent navel-gazing “Who won?” editorials; not just National’s dishonesty and adoption of the rhetoric of altruism — of which more later; not just fear of disunity, within a party or a coalition of parties (a fear that is undemocratic in a mixed society).

On the face of it, the voters declared themselves callous and cowardly, which is how history will view this election. How can otherwise intelligent and caring people so thoroughly misrepresent themselves? Of course, many are complacent — life is good, she’ll be right — but the refusal to face the future or even fix immediate problems reflects not real contentment, but deep insecurity. This is a childish reaction, as in the childish song by Sia:

“I’m gonna swing from the chandelier, I’m gonna live like tomorrow doesn’t exist . . .

“But I’m holding on for dear life, won’t look down, won’t open my eyes.”

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Tyler Hicks, The New York Times – September 23, 2013 A woman tried to shelter children from gunfire by Somali militants at the Westgate mall in Nairobi, Kenya, in an attack that killed more than 70 people. Tyler Hicks made this photo from a floor above, in an exposed area where the police feared for his safety.

Photo: Tyler Hicks, The New York Times – September 23, 2013
A woman tries to shelter her children from gunfire by Somali militants at the Westgate mall in Nairobi, Kenya, in an attack that killed more than 70 people. Tyler Hicks made this photo from a floor above, in an exposed area where the police feared for his safety.

Attack at Westgate Mall

Read more »

Midday madness

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CORRECTION and APOLOGY to David Cunliffe

Earlier this morning I called David Cunliffe a liar for saying he didn’t know about his wife’s @TarnBabe67 Twitter account because he was the first to “Follow” it with his own Twitter account.

Turns out this was impossible.

fsddff

Just a few points though.   Read more »

Media just making stuff up about SAS

Yesterday the Herald ran an article suggesting that NZSAS troops could be deployed to Iraq to battle ISIS.

The problem with that article was that John Key actually said it was his least preferred option for dealing with ISIS.

Today they follow it up with an outright denial, not once but twice from Jonathan Coleman, but not content with that they run off to a journalist and an academic for them to suggest, that just maybe, possibly, the NZSAS might already be overseas or getting ready to deploy overseas.

You can’t make this up…the Minister says no and they think maybe it might be something else.

Defence Minister Jonathan Coleman has dismissed suggestions the elite SAS force is ready and waiting for the green light to go into combat against Isis (Islamic State) militants in Iraq.   Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Mrs Cunliffe does a Mea Culpa, and will now have a short break

…which is code for “going down into the media-proof bunker”

via Newstalk ZB

via Newstalk ZB

And this would be the person that co-aspired to be a Prime Minister’s wife?

Good judgement is not something abundant in the Cunliffe household.

Lying also is a standard fall-back mechanism:

Twitter users said Mr Cunliffe was one of only seven followers the account had over the weekend.

“Interesting he knew nothing about a 3 day old account when he was one of only 7 followers…..,” one posted this morning.

What an omnishables.

With friends like TarnBabe67, what’s Mr TarnBabe67 to do?

Good governance and the Labour Party – an oxymoron or a chance for their future

A guest post by Frances Denz.


 

Good Governance practice was initially developed in 1844 by Erskine May for the British Parliament and a bit later  in 1874 was adapted by Roberts in the US for their Government structures.  Since then “Roberts Rules” have become the model for governance both of parliamentary systems and for businesses.  These rules have been adapted over time by the Foundation formed by Roberts supporters.

A key rule of governance is who do the directors represent?  They represent the business or organisation.  Their job, as stewards, is to ensure that the organisation is governed for its own good.  Not for the shareholders, other stakeholders or the community as a whole.

Now this is really interesting in the governance of political parties and of Parliament themselves.

The Prime Minister and his Cabinet have stewardship over the whole country.  Not the Party: not sector interests: not their mates.  A political party has stewardship over the Party as a whole, not the country.  So where does that leave the Opposition? I submit that they are responsible to the country, as is the Governing party.  But the problem with the Labour Party is that their method of nominating their leader is by the sector interests having a vote – for their own interests.  And the Leader has been, by default, the Leader of the Party as well as the Leader  of the Political wing.  Two different roles. (and then you have the Leader of the House, just to complicate matters!)    Read more »

CDC confirms 1st case of Ebola in USA

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Here it comes…

images

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