Vic Crone and Penny Bright both break the law

And they don’t give a toss. To be honest, why should they? Not a single political candidate has ever suffered financially, or by being disqualified after the fact, for breaking election by-laws. They know it is open season.

Ms Crone and another mayoral candidate, Penny Bright, believe the Bill of Rights overrides a bylaw which prohibits “election signs” until August 6, nine weeks out from the local body elections on October 9.

“I don’t consider our billboards any more distracting than a billboard of Dan Carter in his boxers,” Ms Crone said.

The businesswoman unveiled two billboards in the CBD and Parnell in March. They stated “Vic Crone for Auckland” and referred to her website “vic4mayor.co.nz”– an apparent breach of the Auckland Transport Election Signs bylaw.

At the time, Auckland electoral officer Dale Ofsoske said in his view the billboards were an election sign.

Ms Crone took the signs down when the rental period expired, She has since taken legal advice on the issue.

The advice, she said, was the bylaw was unlawful and unjustifiably breached the Bill or Rights Act.

“It looks to me that the bylaw is being selectively applied to political campaigns as some kind of political censorship.

“That’s exactly the type of nonsense that Aucklanders are sick and tired of.

Not at all. It is people trying to be cute and not paying their rates or putting up signs and then pretending it is some kind of moral stance instead of what we all know it really is: attention grabbing and being a dick.   Read more »

Public transport is for other people…

I loathe public transport. The only redeeming feature of it is loads of other people take it…and aren’t on my roads or in my way.

Politicians love to push people on to public transport…but it seems more and more are ignoring their pleas, especially millennials.

More than a quarter of U.S. government spending on surface transportation goes to mass transit, and yet mass transit accounts for less than 2 percent of total trips taken nationwide. The Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Marc Scribner attributes this eye-popping mismatch to a persistent “falsehood peddled by the transit lobby:” If you build it, they will come.

A stunning chart put together by the University of South Florida’s Steve Polzin illustrates how transit supply has failed to create its own demand.

The blue line represents transit ridership; the red line shows the expansion of the country’s mass transit infrastructure going back to 1970. Their divergence is a “report card on productivity that mom and dad would hardly be proud of,” Polzin writes. It’s also a statistical representation of a sad yet all-too-familiar scene in American cities: empty light rail trains chugging along main streets in deserted downtowns.   Read more »

Shhh…don’t tell anyone but Gerry Brownlee is in Israel

Gerry Brownlee in Israel

Gerry Brownlee travelled to Israel after his visit to Iraq. He’s also tried to keep it very quiet, with it not even being reported in NZ media.

Pity, he went for a visit with ‘Bogie’ Ya’alon though and the Israelis know how to use Facebook.   Read more »

Unions reflect on their loss of power

[Yesterday was] International Workers’ Day, celebrating the labour movement and the eight-hour day.

The day is a public holiday in many countries.

New Zealand has its own Labour Day holiday in October, marking the anniversary of this country adopting an eight-hour working day.

However, many organisations still celebrate solidarity between workers on what is colloquially known as May Day.

Council of Trade Unions economist Bill Rosenberg said people’s working conditions in New Zealand were not improving.

“There’s no effective protection in the law and for many people, if they do work long hours, there’s no recognition in higher rates of pay or overtime pay,” he said.

Something salaried people have been used to for a long time. And lots of self-employed people also know that the extra hours don’t always translate into extra money. Somehow, “workers” expect more.   Read more »

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Judith Collins on gangs and gun control

081111. Photo Maarten Holl/Fairfax Media, The Dominion Post. NEWS. Police College. New firearms, etc, training simulator. minister of Police Judith Collins gets trained by Vince Anthony, Lockheed Martin (US)

Photo Maarten Holl/Fairfax Media, The Dominion Post.

Police Minister Judith Collins is signalling tighter controls on the licensing of firearms to gang members.

“I was really shocked the other day to find that being a gang member doesn’t preclude someone from having a firearms licence, because, apparently, you’re still a fit and proper person,” Ms Collins told Q&A today.

She says “this is the sort of nonsense that we need to change the law on”.

Parliament’s law and order select committee is holding an inquiry into the illegal possession of firearms.

It is looking at how widespread firearm possession is among criminals, including gangs, and how criminals, gangs and those who do not have a licence come into possession of firearms.

The public clearly expect any firearms held by gangs to have been obtained illegally. To discover that some of the gang members have a bona fide firearms licence has been a shock to many.   Read more »

A ban on junk food advertising? How is that going to work then?

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Pies at New World Warkworth

 

Health groups are calling for a ban on junk food advertising and sports sponsorship in a bid to mimic the success of the ban on tobacco ads.

Several groups have made the call in submissions to the Advertising Standards Authority, which is reviewing its code for advertising to children.

Health groups said although big sports events such as rugby or league games might not be solely targeted at children, they were family affairs and children would be influenced by marketing.

They said such selling was one of the many ways children were bombarded by junk food messages.

Medical Association chair Stephen Child said even though such marketing is now common, sport would survive without it. Read more »

This week: John Key v The World

John Key

Last week, Key was forced to defend an approach by his personal lawyer Ken Whitney, who was revealed to have lobbied the Government over changes to tax laws.

The week earlier, he had to bat away questions over a Niue resort contract won by National Party donors, but a misfire on the issue also left Little exposed.

He was forced to defend the sting, while trying to deflect threatened legal action for drawing links where there were none. Read more »

Impertinent question of the day

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via aucklanddailyphoto.com

Greg M asks

Today’s silly question.

How come the majority of “homeless” people, or otherwise known by the media party and other assorted lefty types as “our most vulnerable” seem to be absent from the CBD over the weekends and / or when there is no cruise ships in port?

Could it be that indeed they are not homeless, and are simply scroungers and bludgers coming in to take advantage of the complete lack of policing of such activities?

Whaleoil General Debate

keep-calm-and-don-t-shoot-the-messenger-3Morning everyone, and welcome to Whaleoil’s daily General Debate post (another one called Backchat will start at 6pm). To participate you’ll need to register a free Disqus account.

There are some rules, and if there is one thing about Whaleoil that you need to know is that these rules are dispassionately and strictly enforced.

Face of the Day

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Through this man New Zealand leads the world with another world record, but it is unlikely you know why.

Kiwi freediver William Trubridge has broken his own world record by descending to a depth of 122 metres (400ft) at the Vertical Blue event in the Bahamas.

It’s the 16th world record that Trubridge has broken in his career.

And the 35-year-old’s dive at Dean’s Blue Hole in the Bahamas just shades his former record, which stood at 121m.

Trubridge failed at the same record attempt in March, after suffering a bout of illness. Read more »