Does welfare create jihadis?

It would appear that welfare creates jihadis.

The UK paid Jihadi John’s family more than £400k in welfare, which appears to have turned this guy into a head hacking, murdering scumbag such was his deprived up-bringing suckling on the tit of the state.

Jihadi John and his asylum-seeking family have milked the British benefits system for 20 years, the Mail can reveal today.

Housing the Islamic State executioner and his relatives in affluent parts of London has cost taxpayers up to £400,000.

One landlord said Mohammed Emwazi’s family were ‘parasites’ and ‘tenants from hell’. Incredibly, they are still believed to be pocketing £40,000 a year in handouts despite there being no sign of them in Britain.

Emwazi’s father Jasem, who has six children, is back in his native Kuwait – the country he claimed he fled fearing for his life.

Westminster City Council is still paying the rent on the family’s £600,000 flat even though the rules say housing benefit should normally be stopped after 13 weeks.

MPs said they were horrified that the child of a family given refugee status, citizenship and benefits had returned the favour by orchestrating the murder of two of its citizens.

‘They are abusing our hospitality,’ said Philip Hollobone. ‘The rules are quite clear. If there has been any abuse of the system here, money should be paid back.

‘Mohammed Emwazi’s offences are worse than murder or terrorism. They are an assault on the British way of life.’

David Davies, a fellow Tory MP, said: ‘This is an absolute outrage and a disgrace. We should stop their housing benefit immediately. Mr Emwazi clearly doesn’t need asylum in this country.’    Read more »

“Tainted” Fisher’s colleagues distancing themselves from the Hager freak show

What drives Nicky Hager? That is not a question that comes to mind when I hear or read the work of most people who call themselves journalists. Even strongly opinionated work. It is normally written with an excitement that may be excessive at times but tells me the reporter is motivated solely by the satisfactions of discovery and disclosure.

I hear that excitement in the writing of David Fisher who has worked with Hager for the Herald to disclose what may be learned about New Zealand’s intelligence-gathering in the material Edward Snowden took from the United States National Security Agency.

I hope you hear that excitement in me when I think I have hit on something. But I don’t hear it in Hager. Reading or hearing him, I get the feeling something else is going on. His voice and manner are those of someone who is deeply shocked at the discovery of things that are interesting enough to report but are not really shocking.

You have to ask why David Fisher “feels the excitement” when his “dealer” Hager does not.  And when the public does not.  And when his colleagues do not.   Read more »

Sign of the Day

Sponsored by Web2PrintDownUnder – Private sale signs, from $55

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Spotted at McDonald’s Wanganui

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Photo Of The Day

Image Credit : WikiPedia/Balloon Bomb

Image Credit : WikiPedia/Balloon Bomb

The Deadly Japanese Weather Balloons of World War II

 Although it’s sometimes said there were no enemy-inflicted deaths on the US mainland during World War II, that’s not actually true. In fact, six civilians were killed in Oregon by a bomb that infiltrated the States by hitching a ride on a beefed-up weather balloon. This “balloon bomb” was one of about 9,000 that were launched from Japan with the intentions of floating across the Pacific and wreaking havoc on the US.

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CWC: PAK v SAF and IRE v ZIM

Would pay reductions help then? Would that motivate better outcomes?

The Principals’ union boss doesn’t want principals to get more money. She says that there is no evidence to suggest that paying people more will get better results.

Principals’ Federation president Denise Torrey has criticised the Principal Recruitment Allowance scheme through which five schools have received a $50,000 boost to their principal’s salary.

Opononi School and Mangamuka School in Northland, Ngaruawahia High School in Waikato, Kimi Ora Community School in Hawkes Bay, and Aranui Community Campus in Christchurch are the first to receive the allowance to recruit principals.

Under the scheme, which is part of the government’s $359m Investing in Educational Success programme, principals will receive an additional $50,000 a year for three years and the board can apply for two further renewals of two years each.

Torrey warned that “more money in a principal’s pocket” would not help kids learn better, or make a better principal.

Principal salaries ranged from $90,000 to $160,000 depending on the roll size, she said.   Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  Roger Price

Credit: Roger Price

Key is squandering any remaining media goodwill

Fairfax journo Tracy Watkins is letting her wishful thinking get in the way today in a piece where she posits Key is “burning political capital” over the Hager/Fisher GCSB “revelations”.

Are the latest leaked documents important? Yes, of course.

Actually, they’re not.

They detail the vast and indiscriminate store of information gathered by the Government Communications Security Bureau, including plenty that must surely breach the spirit, if not the technicalities, of the 2013 GCSB Act.

Once the media get back to the “spirit” of news reporting instead of running the country, they might actually have a leg to stand on.

The Act spells out that it is illegal for the agency to intercept the private communications of New Zealand citizens and residents, except in specific circumstances or when it is “incidentally obtained” – which, as we now know, is likely to include while they are lying on a beach in Samoa.

There are bound to be diplomatic ripples, meanwhile, over the extent to which the GCSB reaches into the Pacific.

There are bound not to be.  Unless you’ve been living under a rock, are particularly unaware of how the real world works, or you have your own ‘outrage’ agenda, people 1) know their stuff is up for grabs, and 2) they truly don’t care.

We are told that the targets include friends and foe alike, though we are yet to see any direct evidence of  that claim – say, for instance, a transcript of a private phone call between the prime minister of Samoa and his mates.

Nonetheless, it is probably no coincidence that John Key will embark on a goodwill tour of the Pacific later this year, including a likely stop-off in Fiji.

Yeah, that’s right.  John Key wasn’t going on a Pacific trip until Hager and Fisher dusted off some Helen Clark era stolen documents to try and blow some life back into the same old issue.   And now Key needs to go around a tour to calm down his Pacific neighbours.   That has to be the reason.   Read more »

Team New Zealand AND Auckland Council? What could possibly go wrong?

Team New Zealand’s bid to host the America’s Cup qualifiers has hit a further snag, with crisis meetings held yesterday over problems with the proposed locations for the team bases.

An announcement confirming Auckland had secured the qualifying regatta in early 2017 was originally planned for yesterday but has been pushed back to next week as Team NZ try to put some distance between the fallout over Dean Barker’s axing.

In the meantime, Auckland Council bodies are struggling to agree on the waterfront locations to house the team bases after the preferred site at Westhaven Marina was found to be unsuitable within the short timeframe.

Plans to build a causeway between the end of Westhaven Drive and a seawall in two stages have encountered geotechnical and practical problems.

The first stage of building the causeway and starting repairs on the seawall is sufficient to accommodate two syndicate bases, but completing the second stage to accommodate three more syndicate bases is estimated to cost an unbudgeted $10 million to $15 million.

Team New Zealand manage to suck more money out of the tax (rate) payers after all.  On the good side, this is only for Auckland victims.  Until Steve Joyce figures out how to repackage his corporate welfare deal.   Read more »

Charter schools what do they offer?

Graphic showing how AMERICAN Charter schools intersect with public schools

Graphic showing how AMERICAN Charter schools intersect with public schools

 

Cards on the table, I have been invited to visit two Charter schools in Auckland. I suspect that I have been invited because of frustration at both Politicians and the MSM who discuss/ criticise  Charter schools but refuse to actually visit any.

I will be visiting them to find out for myself their points of difference. I have never before been to a Charter school and at present know no more about them than any average person on the street. I know that they offer an alternative to mainstream schooling and that they have more flexibility in how they deliver their education to their students. What that flexibility actually translates to is what I will be finding out.

I do not have an agenda to either make them look good or make them look bad. My task is to report back to our readership what exactly they do offer and how they are different to Mainstream. I am taking my home schooled 16 year old daughter with me to interview the primary school students. She will be asking them what she as a teenager wants to know about Charter schooling. What a teenager values in education may be different to what I as a parent, a home schooler and an ex mainstream High School teacher and tutor in Alternative education values.

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