NZ

Will National privatise the RMA process?

Nick-Smith_0

Somehow this slipped past the radar because most journos seems to be calling it in at the moment, but it just popped back on.  Corin Dann reports

The government wants to let other providers compete with local councils for the issuing of property consents.

The government blames council red tape for a lack of housing development. Read more »

Some thoughts from a reader on RMA reform

A reader emails:


‚ÄčIt is great news that the Government is going to reform the RMA, but if the prime suspect is still operating with impunity will it make any difference?

Talk to anyone in the property industry and their eyes will roll back as they recount the endless torture endured at the hands of Local Government. Whilst many point the finger of blame at legislation there is no question that the bigger issue is the manner in which the law is implemented and administered by the control freaks within regional and local councils.

Hand in hand with reform of the RMA, needs to be systemic reform of the LGA to refine the functions and powers of Local Government.

What New Zealand doesn’t need is more bureaucracy and meddling by a gravy train of local officials.

What New Zealand needs is efficient competitive opportunities and pragmatic short term processes to allow planning approvals for urban areas. There is no question that the environment needs protecting in places and that the RMA has done well to ensure that empirical and judicial scrutiny is applied to development in sensitive locations.

But within our urban landscape too much prissy and protective rule making has choked the daylights out of development. ¬† Read more »

Photo caption of the day

 
adjective: ambiguous
  1. open to more than one interpretation; not having one obvious meaning.
    “ambiguous phrases”

    Dotcom has lost his appeal.

-The Herald

It is true. I don’t know about you guys but I certainly don’t fancy him.

Tagged:

Here’s an idea for Keith Locke…YOU go and tell ISIS in person that dialogue is the answer

Keith Locke reckons we should establish dialogue with a bunch of ranting, stone age killers.

I’m not kidding.

This is the same guy who thought Pol Pot was just misunderstood…and who jumped for joy when planes flew into the World Trade Centre during 9/11.

In April 1975 Locke wrote a lead article for ‘Socialist Action’ under the banner heading: “Cambodia Liberated: Victory For Humanity” The “liberators” were of course the Khmer Rouge led by the infamous Pol Pot.

and;

When I first saw the planes fly into the towers I jumped for joy, I was so happy that at long last capitalism was under attack. Until, it suddenly dawned on me, what about all those poor pizza delivery boys, those poor firemen, those poor policemen, those poor lift-operators, all those poor cleaners, all those other poor workers who are forced to work for and were trying to save those greedy and horrible capitalists!? My heart and head was so confused – happy that some capitalists had been killed and very, very sad for all those who had died while working for them.

So excuse me if I don’t just scream at the NZ Herald for giving this guy a platform. On the plus side it is a shrinking platform.¬† Read more »

Our ISIS problem solved: Iraqi PM doesn’t want our help

Sending the SAS or not to send the SAS?   Key vs the left and the media?   All of this is no longer a problem.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi [yesterday]ruled out any foreign ground intervention to assist government forces in retaking territory lost to jihadists and urged Sunnis to give up such hopes.

Abadi was speaking in the city of Najaf after a rare meeting with the most revered figure among Iraqi Shiites, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, and before a trip to neighbouring Iran.

“No ground forces from any superpower, international coalition or regional power will fight here,” Abadi told reporters, reiterating previous remarks on the issue.

“This is my decision, it is the decision of the Iraqi government.”

Some officials and Sunni tribal leaders in areas most affected by the unrest have argued the world should step up its involvement from air strikes to a ground intervention against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group.

Ignoring the fact that ISIS are quite happy to have foreign boots on the ground, the fears of the Iraqi PM seems to be more about being invaded by stealth: ¬† Read more »

Tagged:

Deputy Ardern: a tactical error, arrogance or the first sign of incompetence?

Unlike the party leader who is elected by the unions, membership and the caucus, Labour’s deputy leader is always selected by the caucus.

Jacinda Ardern may emerge as Labour deputy leader whoever wins the race for the top job, but her nomination as Grant Robertson’s running mate is seen as a risk because the deputy’s job may be useful in reconciling the rival camps.

The Wellington Central MP nominated Ardern as his preferred deputy on Sunday, but his main rivals have signalled they will not name a favoured deputy.

Former president Andrew Little, who made the early running in the tight race, said he would not promise any role to anyone. Acting leader David Parker said he would ‚Äė‚Äėstand on my own two feet‚Äô‚Äô.

Caucus spokeswoman Annette King said that, unlike the leadership, the choice of deputy was determined by the party’s MPs alone.

That could potentially stymie Robertson‚Äôs choice ‚Äď although it is unlikely the caucus would make such a blatant challenge to a new leader ‚Äď or see her elected deputy whoever wins.

However, one party source yesterday said Robertson’s move was risky because the deputy’s role could be a useful olive branch to help unify the caucus after the run-offs.

Here’s the problem: ¬†Robertson is said to have only 12 supporters within caucus. ¬†If the remainder do not support Ardern, even in the event Robertson wins, the caucus can install its own thorn in Robertson’s side. ¬†Someone like Parker, or Little, for example. ¬† Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Not sure channelling Pauline Hanson is a winner, Jacinda dear

350657-pauline-hanson

Jacinda Ardern working like a navvy in the chippy

It appears that Jacinda Ardern is a little sensitive about her one page CV and lack of real world experience.

She has gone all snippy and declared that she is just like Pauline Hansen from Australia and has worked in a fish and chip shop.

Labour MP Jacinda Ardern has rejected a “beltway babies” jibe, saying she’s “worked longer in a fish and chip shop than as a parliamentary staffer”.

Ardern has thrown her support behind Grant Robertson’s party leadership bid, with Robertson saying he wanted her as deputy leader should he win.

The deputy is decided by the caucus, but the MP recommended by the leader is often chosen.

The other leadership contenders – David Parker, Andrew Little and Nanaia Mahuta – have ruled out picking a deputy before the leadership vote in mid-November.

At an event in Auckland yesterday, Wellington Central MP Robertson announced Ardern was his pick for deputy should he become leader.

“She connects with a broad range of New Zealanders, lives and breathes our values, and has driven bold and new policy for children,” he said.

“I would be proud to serve with her.” ¬† Read more »

Speaker cops it on day one

via zimbio.com

via zimbio.com

MPs were reminded that today was about ceremony.  John Key got criticised for cracking a joke at the expense of the Labour Party, but somehow (not surprisingly), Russel Norman once again failed to observe the occasion and got stuck in

David Carter was re-elected Speaker in a vote prompted by the fact returning NZ First MP Ron Mark was put forward by his Leader Winston Peters.

Mr Mark later indicated his nomination came as something of a surprise.

Mr Carter’s re-election was welcomed by Prime Minister John Key but Acting Labour Leader David Parker and Greens Co-leader Russel Norman had some requests for him.

“There will be contentious moments in this House”, Mr Parker said in his address to Mr Carter.

“The business of Opposition and the business of Government are both very important roles we are reliant on you giving us a fair go.” Read more »

TV/radio coverage of Parliament today starts now

Parliament opens today.

Click here to watch online, or view other viewing/listening options.

Narrated by Jim Moira, it seems.

weerw

Read more »