Politics

Watercare visits Penny Bright and investigates her meter

My sources have told me that this morning Watercare turned up at Penny Bright’s house and started investigating her unusual water reticulation methods.

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As I posted on the weekend it appears that Penny Bright has breached Watercare’s bylawsRead more »

No matter what we do, no matter what we say…

Back during the 2014 election campaign Katie Bradford revealed her frustration with the polls and with voters by stating to cameras that, “No matter what we do, no matter what we say, the polls still favour National.”

It showed her complete and utter bias for all to see.

This morning on Radio NZ there was another reveal, this time from Guyon Espiner when talking to an academic about housing affordability.

Espiner was astounded that the claims of Nick Smith about housing affordability were actually true and the academic was busily explaining that although what Nick Smith said was true he was still wrong.

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Penny Hulse endorses wet councillors

Being too wet for Nikki Kaye, the Prima Donna of the wet wing of the National Party, is exceptionally bad news for any alleged right-wing council candidate.

Bill Cashmore, Linda Cooper and Calum Penrose are way too wet for Nikki, so wet that they have managed to win the endorsement of the very left-wing Penny Hulse.

Reflecting on the article by Bernard Orsman in the Herald on the lack of cohesion in the “right” Bernard expresses his views but then goes on to quote Nikki Kaye, Auckland MP who says that the right is disappointed with cllrs Linda Cooper Bill Cashmore and Calum Penrose. I am astounded at this!

These 3 councillors have worked tirelessly for the good of Auckland and have done a huge amount of the heavy lifting, Calum with his huge success on dangerous dogs, Bill overseeing our transport negotiations with government and Linda carrying a huge portfolio of Hearings and also community responsibilities. Councillors need to do much more than swan around currying favour with political parties and saying no to everything. They need to work for the good of the city and all it’s communities.    Read more »

The House Today #nzqt

Parliament is sitting today.

You can follow proceedings starting at 2 pm on TV (Freeview 22, Sky 86), streaming audio via Radio New Zealand and streaming Parliament TV via the internet. After the sitting day, on-demand replays can be found at In The House.

Questions to Ministers

  1. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: On what dates did he discuss with the Minister of Revenue his conversation with Ken Whitney on foreign trusts, and what specifically did he say to the Minister?
  2. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement on 11 November 2015 regarding Silver Fern Farms, “The parties to the deal have every incentive to ensure that it is a good deal, and actually, every incentive to ensure that it is lawful”?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Why, on 13 April, when he told reporters that he had been approached by someone in the foreign trusts industry who was concerned that the rules for trusts were about to be tightened, did he not reveal that person was his personal lawyer?
  4. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received indicating continuing economic growth in 2016, low inflation for New Zealand households, and increased business activity?
  5. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that we are “on the cusp of something special” given the median Auckland house price has risen by $100,000 since January? Read more »

Tamati Coffey doesn’t even know his electorate boundaries

Tamati Coffey just can’t put a foot right these days.

One of the most basic requirements of being a candidate is knowing where your electorate is, and by default, where it is not.

Mr Coffey can’t even get this right.

In a recent post he bemoans the loss of “an icon of the Rotorua Electorate”.

It is sad to hear that Kiwi360 – an icon of the Rotorua Electorate, one so famous it even had its own stamp – has been brought and closed for good, with the site set to become the corporate offices of a kiwifruit company.

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Calum Penrose facing a real fight as his former allies abandon him

Calum Penrose is declaring that he’s running as an independent, but the truth is he’s been dumped by his former allies who regard him as a traitor for hiking rates for grandiose Labour-backed big spending while failing to take care of his own Manurewa-Papakura ward.

Penrose is low profile in Papakura and invisible in Manurewa (where two thirds of the votes will be cast). When he does speak he is highly critical of Manurewa Local Board chairperson Angela Dalton, who is much-loved in her area.

Penrose claims he voted for a 9.9 per cent rate increase to fund $523 million worth of transport project. Yet he failed to secure just $2 million to keep Te Mahia Station safe for his own constituents.

Penrose says the local board campaigned on making Te Mahia a top priority and “throwing money at it”.

“The board has $2.5m unspent in its Regional Land Transport Programme budget.

“I can’t understand why they’re making it a priority to build a covered walkway which is on private land. They should go to Auckland Transport and say ‘we will put some skin in the game and put $1m into improving it [Te Mahia]’.

“But they want Auckland Transport to do everything.”

Penrose says Te Mahia has low patronage numbers and is therefore not as high a priority for upgrades as busier stations with more pressing security issues.

Lighting has been installed at Te Mahia and he’s working with the Manukau Beautification Trust to “tidy it up”.

“I would have thought Te Mahia would be the board’s priority. That’s what they campaigned on. They put something in, AT puts something in, it’s a win-win.”

Penrose says the station is covered by monitored CCTV cameras, its platform is lit to AT’s standards and the facility is patrolled by security guards.

“It has a public address system through which AT’s control room can speak directly to people on the platform. AT also liaises daily with police through its operations centre, assessing threats and managing issues on the network.

“Lights are being installed in the walkway that runs from Ferguson St to the station and contractors are still confirming details of the lighting that will be installed in the walkway that runs from Great South Rd.”   Read more »

How is socialism working out for Venezuela?

Socialism is touted as the answer to many of the world’s problems, ironically by socialists who live in capitalist countries.

But what is happening in real socialist countries…like Venezuela?

Despair and violence is taking over Venezuela. The economic crisis sweeping the nation means people have to withstand widespread shortages of staple products, medicine, and food.

So when the Maduro administration began rationing electricity this week, leaving entire cities in the dark for up to 4 hours every day, discontent gave way to social unrest.

On April 26, people took to the streets in three Venezuelan states, looting stores to find food.

Maracaibo, in the western state of Zulia, is the epicenter of thefts: on Tuesday alone, Venezuelans raided pharmacies, shopping malls, supermarkets, and even trucks with food in seven different areas of the city.

Although at least nine people were arrested, and 2,000 security officers were deployed in the state, Zulia’s Secretary of Government Giovanny Villalobos asked citizens not to leave their homes. “There are violent people out there that can harm you,” he warned.    Read more »

Phil Quin compares Labour and Labor

Phil Quin looks at the comparison between Labour in NZ and Labor in Australia, and finds the difference isn’t just a ‘u’.

The Australian experience suggests the answer for Labour in New Zealand is not “change the leader”, the knee-jerk response most often preferred. The ALP is within reach, if not exactly favoured, in the coming election despite having a leader with frankly atrocious numbers. Traumatized by the Rudd-Gillard wars, MPs and activists have by and large rallied behind Shorten (albeit a loveless loyalty in many cases), who has in turn worked hard to restore the party to viability.

Compared to Shorten, Phil Goff had it easy in 2008. Helen Clark and Michael Cullen had left Labour in decent shape. And yet, despairingly, Labour’s share of the vote has declined in each subsequent election as the party turned inwards, interpreting each defeat as anything but a repudiation; blaming instead the electorate’s inability to “see through” the diabolical Key, the spectre of “dirty politics” (known in Australia and elsewhere as “politics”), one million dogmatically left-wing voters who habitually forget to vote, David Cunliffe, the mythic ‘Anyone But Cunliffes’, or, at barrel’s bottom, residual fury at the party’s embrace of neoliberalism in the Eighties. That voters might have got it right in their intuition that Labour fails to demonstrate readiness for government is never countenanced.

Labour’s refusenik posture was never more graphically on display than in the review of Cunliffe’s defeat by former UK Labour MP Bryan Gould: the key to Labour’s rejuvenation, Gould insisted, is pretending to get along at all costs – perpetuating the self-serving myth that internal bickering, real and imagined, is all the only thing standing between the party and its destiny. Proponents of this position would point to the Rudd/Gillard experience, but they are confusing an ingredient for the whole recipe: not tearing one another apart is a necessary prerequisite to electoral success, but it is not, on its own, sufficient.

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Todd McClay fires shot across bow

Todd McClay is muscling up against defamatory statements from Rotorua Labour and Tamati Coffey.

Legal action would be considered should the Rotorua Labour Party “again defame” Rotorua MP Todd McClay.

Mr McClay said in a statement to Steam N Mud today he was “extremely disappointed” at what he considered an unwarranted personal attack over his involvement in the global Panama Tax evasion scandal.

Todd McClay is a good MP and doesn’t want to be distracted by petty squabbles with a political wannabe.   Read more »

Taxing taxes

John Key

ACT remind us that National are slowly edging backwards on a fairly solid election promise.

No New Taxes?
National campaigned on no new taxes and will soon have introduced three. It begs the question, why vote for a National party that introduces new taxes like a Labour Government on heat?

Tourist Tax
The tourism industry is furious about the $25 arrival fee applied to visitors. It was sold as a user charge but the Government has never shown how it covers cost created by the user. That’s a tax. Read more »

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