The loaded bias and utter stupidity of Newshub

Newshub are running a story by Dan Satherley on wealth in New Zealand. In writing his story he reveals his political leanings with his overly emotive language.

He also reveals his utter foolishness and lack of intelligence in analysing information.

It is an article seeking to reinforce that there are disparities in NZ society and how wrong that is.

The richest 10 percent of Kiwis have hoarded more than half the country’s wealth, with the bottom 40 percent scraping by with only 3 percent.

And the gap between rich and poor has widened in the last decade, the new figures from Statistics NZ show.

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My apology to Paul Foster-Bell

Earlier today I accused troughing scum List MP Paul Foster-Bell of not achieving anything…I was wrong…well sort of.

He has been trying to rename State Highway One the “Captain Cook Highway”…unsuccessfully.

Under-fire National MP Paul Foster-Bell has been campaigning for State Highway 1 to be renamed the Captain Cook Highway.

Newshub has learned Mr Foster-Bell has been lobbying for the name change on behalf of Sir Christopher Harris — a wealthy National Party stalwart who is also a Captain Cook enthusiast.

A source who used to work in Mr Foster-Bell’s office said: “Paul’s massive groundbreaking idea for a member’s Bill was renaming SH1 the Captain Cook Highway.”

The source said Mr Foster-Bell was “trying to impress Sir Christopher”, who donates to the National Party.   Read more »

The heartless tax-paying few

money-bribe-1

ACT reminds us how few of us actually die having been net contributors to the tax take.

Tax Numbers

Sometimes the press get it completely wrong.  This article on how much tax New Zealanders pay at different income levels was placed at the bottom of the Stuff website by editors but topped the ‘most-read’ section all day.  It tells us that three per cent of income earners pay 24 per cent of all income tax while 40 per cent receive more in cash benefits than they pay in tax.

What About Indirect Taxes?

But wait, those 40 per cent also pay GST and petrol and tobacco and alcohol excise taxes.  Yes they do, but so do all taxpayers.  Indirect taxes make up about a third of all taxes, with income taxes on business and personal income making up the other two thirds.  Could it be that many low income earners are net taxpayers once indirect taxes are considered?

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Mental Health Break

Simon Collins pimps a hard luck story for anti-smoking troughers

Simon Collins is the go-to person for hard luck stories, and he is pimping a story about the defunding of anti-smoking lobby groups.

New Zealand’s biggest anti-smoking lobby groups face likely closure after a Government decision to slash funding for anti-smoking advocacy.

The Smokefree Coalition will close next month, Action on Smoking and Health (Ash) faces closure unless it can find new funding sources, and Smokefree Nurses Aotearoa and Pacific anti-smoking agency Tala Pasifika have all lost their funding from this week.

Instead, the Ministry of Health has awarded a single national anti-smoking advocacy contract to West Auckland-based Maori health agency Hapai Te Hauora.

Total funding for national advocacy has been cut from $1.7 million to $450,000.

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Map of the Day

The Media party think you should care about the Australian elections

The Media party continue their clickbait five-reasons-style headlines, but come up rather short with their five reasons why Kiwis should care about the Australian election.

Polls have Labor slightly ahead in Australia’s fast-approaching July 2 election. So why should Kiwis care? Here are five reasons:

1. An estimated 600,000 New Zealanders live and work in Australia. While they can’t vote in the election, they will be affected by government policies.

2. The future of the political relationship between Australia and New Zealand — there has long been anger among New Zealanders at being treated like second-class citizens in Australia and there are calls for Prime Minister John Key to lobby the Government on behalf of Kiwis. It is estimated New Zealanders contribute $5 billion in tax annually. But they cannot vote or claim welfare. A clamp down on immigration law has also seen Kiwis deported without warning, arrest or criminal convictions.    Read more »

Oh the irony – the people scared of Brexit border control are looking to leave

So, they wanted to stay in the EU but, now they won’t be, they are looking at bailing out altogether.

New Zealand could see an influx of immigration from the United Kingdom, if a huge rise in Britons Googling for information about moving to New Zealand is anything to go by.

A Google Trends report shows a large spike in people from the UK searching “moving to New Zealand” after the country voted to leave the European Union on Friday.

They were also looking for information on Canada and Australia.

The Immigration NZ website has also seen traffic rise following the Brexit vote, more than doubling since Friday.   Read more »

More good news

New Zealand is doing well, coming in fourth in the list of the Prosperity Index.

Labour will be having kittens because they see New Zealand as an economic basket case.

Every year, the Legatum Institute, a London-based think tank, releases its annual global Prosperity Index, a huge survey that ranks the most prosperous countries in the world.

The amount of money a country has is one factor of prosperity, but the Legatum Institute considers more than that in its ranking.

The organisation compares 89 variables to come up with its list. These variables include traditional indicators like per capita gross domestic product and the number of people in full-time work as well as more interesting figures such as the number of secure internet servers a country has and how well rested people feel on a day-to-day basis.

The variables are then split into eight subindexes: economy, entrepreneurship and opportunity, governance, education, health, safety and security, personal freedom, and social capital.

The index looked at the 142 countries that have the most available data.

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Photo Of The Day

In a photograph taken after the war, deadly special agent Christine Granville smiles for a picture. The former beauty queen - who smiles for the camera with a sideways glance - has good reason to be cheerful. As shown by the military badge pinned above her heart, the war was over and she had no reason to hide, instead posing with perfect poise as she savoured the rewards of her heroism. However, the other images in the collection show the darker side of her work where devastation and death were part of her daily existence. In what could be mistaken for an innocent snapshot of the French countryside, Christine poses next to two wooden struts - all that remained of a bridge blasted to smithereens as part of the Allied liberation of France. Her sweet smile, first as she poses alone, then with a comrade from the French resistance, tells little of the destruction she is celebrating.

In a photograph taken after the war, deadly special agent Christine Granville smiles for a picture. The former beauty queen – who smiles with a sideways glance – has good reason to be cheerful. As shown by the military badge pinned above her heart, the war was over and she had no reason to hide, instead posing with perfect poise as she savoured the rewards of her heroism.  

‘The Spy Who had Men for Breakfast…

But Few of Them Lasted ’til Dinner’

She was the deadly special agent who charged headlong into occupied territory to fight for her country and the Jewish mother who was killed in a concentration camp.

Christine Granville (real name Krystyna Skarbek) – the favourite spy of Winston Churchill – worked for years for British secret service organisation SOE (aka the Baker Street Irregulars) undermining the Nazi regime despite having a short life expectancy in the field.  She became celebrated especially for her daring exploits in intelligence and irregular-warfare missions in Nazi-occupied Poland and France.

Granville, was one of the most successful women agents of the Second World War and said to have been Churchill’s ‘favourite spy’, was murdered, aged 37, in a London Hotel in 1952. Her actions as a British secret agent in Poland, Hungary, and France were legendary even in her lifetime and she repeatedly risked her life to undertake dangerous missions. Her exploits began after the fall of Poland when she became a British agent; organising the escape of British prisoners-of-war, Polish pilots and refugees and returning to Poland, her homeland, to set up escape routes and report on German troop movements. Her capture by the Gestapo led to a dramatic escape from Budapest in the boot of a car followed by travels through Turkey and Syria to Cairo. Christine is an inspiring and unforgettable true hero.

The daughter of a feckless Polish aristocratic and his wealthy Jewish wife, she became one of Britain’s most daring and highly decorated secret agents. Having fled Poland on the outbreak of war, she was recruited by the intelligence services long before the establishment of the SOE, and took on mission after mission. She skied over the hazardous High Tatras into Poland, served in Egypt and North Africa and was later parachuted into Occupied France, where an agent’s life expectancy was only six weeks.

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