Finally a minister who gets that driverless cars and not trains is our future

Simon Bridges appears to get it.

That our future lies in enabling technologies not restrictive technologies.

Trains are constrained by tracks and are not at all versatile, whereas driverless vehicles are enabling in many, many ways.

The prospect of cars travelling New Zealand highways with no one behind the wheel is moving closer says new Transport Minister Simon Bridges. Officials are reviewing legislation allowing for the testing of umanned autonomous vehicles on public roads.

Mr Bridges has pledged to work with environmental interests while also pursuing the Government’s road building programme.

Mr Bridges said he was committed to “a balanced approach” and ongoing investment roads were important even from a green perspective, “over time as we move to electric vehicles and autonomous vehicles”.

Mr Bridges said the Government was not doing a great deal to accommodate autonomous vehicle technology, “but I don’t think there’s any doubt that if you look at what’s going on internationally, maybe not in the next couple of years, but over time we will see driverless vehicles and that will have implications, like for example less congestion because vehicles can travel closer together”.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Fred Morley A man carries the milk over rubble in the streets of London while firefighters battle the aftermath of the 32nd straight night of bombing.

Photo: Fred Morley
A man carries the milk over rubble in the streets of London while firefighters battle the aftermath of the 32nd straight night of bombing.

The Milk Must Get Through!!

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The House Today #nzqt

Question time/Questions for oral answer starts at 2 pm today.

Questions to Ministers

 

  1. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Deputy Prime Minister: Will he make reducing child poverty a Better Public Service target given the statement in the Speech from the Throne that his Government will continue to “have a focus on poverty, especially child poverty”?
  2. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: What will be the main features of the Government’s economic plan during this term of Parliament?
  3. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Prime Minister: How many times, since November 2008, has he spoken with blogger Cameron Slater on the phone and how many times, if any, has he texted him?
  4. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister of Building and Housing: Does he agree with the statement from the Speech from the Throne that the Government will “have a focus on housing in this Parliamentary term. More special housing areas will be created – and therefore more new housing developed – as a result of Housing Accords signed between the Government and local councils”?
  5. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister for Building and Housing:What advice has he received on the monthly rate of new house builds from when this Government was first elected in 2008 and the current rate? Read more »

Thank goodness David Parker knows why Labour lost

It’s too red.

I kid you not.  Parker thinks the colour of the party logo is a problem.

After you realise he’s not being ‘interviewed’ by The Civilian, and you think he’s done being ridiculous, he’s also called Labour cult-like.

Labour leadership contender David Parker says Labour borders on feeling like “a cult” and must look at its branding – including its symbolic red party colour.

Mr Parker made the comments in an interview with the Herald as part of a series on the four leadership contenders.

He said part of the overhaul as Labour tried to recover from its damaging election loss should include its branding, which was the shopfront of the party most noticeable to the public.

“At the moment I think we present ourselves in the Labour Party as so … well, some of our imagery is so clearly ‘Labour red’. Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Someone phone the Herald and help them over their denial

Adam, the election is over.  Time to accept it.

qweq

Labour’s losers review flawed from the get go

Labour picked one of the Labour movements biggest losers to review their performance at the election. He is Bryan Gould.

Chris Keall explains his credentials at losing.

The convenor for Labour’s panel is Bryan Gould – the ex-pat famous for being a senior MP in the British Labour Party. He even got as high as making a bid for the party’s leadership in the early 1990s, but was outmanoeuvred by rivals and returned to NZ to become vice chancellor of Waikato University.

Gould is a smart man, I’m sure. But he’s not a winner in the game of politics. The ex-pat was a senior MP between 1979 and 1992 – a period of course dominated by Thatcher and the Conservatives as Labour struggled to make itself look anything close to electable.

Gould has poured vitriol on Tony Blair – the man whose up-beat style and move to the centre saw the party finally return to power.

Many in Labour will agree with Gould’s critiques of Blair for going too far in greasing up the press, moderating policy, and poodling to America on Iraq. In various newspaper editorials and his memoirs, Gould won the moral high ground hands down. But he lacks Blair’s ruthless and practical streak, and focus on likeability, that’s so necessary to win power.

A key question for NZ Labour is whether to shore up the party’s base with hard left polices or move to the centre, where elections are won. No prizes for guessing where the academic Gould will land.

Just last Thursday, Gould was comparing Key to Kim Jong-un. Great lorks if you’re a humour writer for the Internet Party. Not so much if you’re trying to talk to middle NZ.

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Victim of “New Zealand’s Rolf Harris” is not giving up

Name suppression for the “high profile New Zealander” that gave David Cunliffe a bottle of wine and published a photo of themselves on his Facebook page is still in place.  The victim has been, and continues to fight for suppression to be lifted.

The offence took place in Louise Hemsley’s home in November 2011.

“It’s like an invasion isn’t it, it’s an invasion of your privacy, he invaded my space and took advantage,’’ Hemsley told TVNZ.

The man responsible was ‘‘a person I suppose you would look up to; he’s had a brilliant career’’.

The man was originally charged with indecent assault, but it was downgraded to indecent act, a charge he agreed to plead guilty to.

He was convicted and ordered to pay compensation, but immediately lodged an appeal, eventually winning a discharge without conviction and final name suppression.

It is this slimy process that has him more or less “unknown” to the public, but in reality the whispers have gone around the country enough times now for most people to be aware of the offender’s identity.   Read more »

Paraphrasing Justice Simon France: Kim Dotcom’s stories don’t stack up

And so Kim Dotcom cops another one in the glockenspiel:

Claims by internet mogul Kim Dotcom of a conspiracy between the United States and New Zealand Governments do not have “an air of reality”, a High Court judge has ruled.

In a decision released today, Justice Simon France upheld a previous court ruling not to order Government agencies to release all the information they hold on the Mega founder to help him with his extradition battle.

His lawyers had argued last month that a judicial review should be conducted on Government agencies withholding and redacting files requested by Dotcom and his legal team to decide whether they were legitimately withheld.

It was relevant to his extradition process because previous files had been withheld and later released which showed “political pressure” in the granting of permanent residency to Dotcom, his lawyers argued.

They claimed Immigration New Zealand approved his application despite his previous convictions and despite the Security Intelligence Service (SIS) informing it of a possible FBI investigation.

Simply Gruesome lawyers really aren’t adding to their CVs of late.  All this is fanciful speculation at best.

What did the Judge actually say?   Read more »

Is this why @Freednz want drone operators?

Alleged training video from Springhill