Did you know we still have convicted homosexuals running free?

Before homosexual law reform came in during the ’80s (and boy, was that a debacle), police actually prosecuted gay men for doing things that heterosexual men could do legally. ¬†And some of them still carry such convictions on their police records.

People convicted of historical homosexual acts could have their criminal records wiped, with new Justice Minister Amy Adams saying she is open to resuming talks on the subject.

Until the Homosexual Law Reform Act was passed in 1986 – with the help of then-Wellington MP Fran Wilde – sex between men was a crime.

But although those who were convicted before 1986 do not need to declare their convictions because of the Clean Slate Act, activists say the stigma still hangs over them.

Earlier this year, former justice minister Judith Collins received advice from the Ministry of Justice about options for pardoning or expunging those convictions

But the ministry refused to provide the information to The Dominion Post, saying it needed to protect the confidentiality of advice given by officials.

It also said it did not hold information on the total number of convictions under the act, nor did it have any idea how many people might be eligible to be pardoned or have their convictions expunged.

The ministry said it could provide figures for people convicted on homosexuality-related offences between July 1, 1980, and August 8, 1986.

During that period, there were 879 convictions, including sodomy with another man aged over 16, committing an indecent act with another man, and “keeping place of resort for homosexual acts”.

Guess what? ¬†The Green Party was working with the National party to clear this up. ¬† Uhuh, ¬†odd eh? ¬†Wonder if Russel “knew”? ¬† Read more »

Is the percentage of kiddie fiddling clergy higher than the general population?

It’s good they are getting found out. ¬†But it makes you wonder how many have gotten away with it

A Wellington church pastor has been arrested and charged in relation to alleged sexual offending against two young girls, and police requested his passport be confiscated to prevent him returning to Fiji.

Jone Conikeli, 41, was charged with nine counts of sexual offending against two girls aged under 16 after being interviewed by police about the allegations on Tuesday morning.

He faced charges of rape, assault with intent to rape, abduction, and indecent assault, Wellington police said.

He appeared in Hutt Valley District Court later on Tuesday, and was remanded on bail. He is due to reappear next month.

Detective Owen Brunel, the child protection unit officer in charge of the case, said the complainants were aged under 12 and under 16 at the time of the alleged offending. They came forward earlier this month, alleging that the offending happened earlier this year.

Both girls had been interviewed by police and were being supported by Child, Youth and Family, Brunel said.

Police requested Conikeli hand over his passport in recent weeks after they learned of his plans to travel while he was under investigation.

The only “odd” thing about this upstanding chap is that he’s into little girls. ¬†But then he’s not Catholic. ¬† Read more »

Mental Health Break

Forget tea breaks, it is smokers who take diabolical liberties

The NZ Herald editorial this morning is having a party political broadcast on behalf of the Labour party and their whinge fest over tea breaks.

It is a pity that almost the first legislative act of the Government’s new term is an act abolishing mandatory “tea breaks” for workers.

Certainly the previous law was dated, though it was enacted under Labour as recently as 2008. It was an echo of an era when most work was menial, repetitive, tedious, sometimes exhausting, and most people were employed on terms negotiated collectively. Today a minority of the workforce belongs to unions and those who do are mostly in state employment. They are in desk jobs or professions and hardly need rest and meal breaks specified in law.

In fact most might have been alarmed to be permitted just one paid 10-minute break in a period of two to four hours, or two 10-minute breaks and a 30-minute meal break in a six to eight-hour working day. The Government has replaced those provisions with a less precise requirement for rest and meal breaks to be agreed between employers and staff. It is a sensible change but was it necessary? The previous law operated as a statutory minimum, a safety net for anyone with an unreasonable employer, but it hardly intruded on normal workplaces.

For a start tea breaks are not abolished, they are made more flexible allowing workers to take breaks when peaks times are at an end.¬† Read more »

Map of the Day

Sponsored by What Power Crisis, click here for this week’s Solar Deal


B1AbuOdCUAEXGbb

We can’t win. ¬†Either people leaving for Aus is bad.
And now it’s bad because they come back and drive our house prices up!


Read more »

Four years old but so accurate for today, Thomas Sewell on Global Warming and other causes

Author Thomas Sowell argues that public demand for intellectuals is largely manufactured by intellectuals themselves. He says intellectuals make alarming predictions using causes like global warming to create a need for their services.

Which brings us to New Zealand. ¬†¬† Read more »

Where is Grant’s Aspiring Deputy Leader?

Jacinda Ardern has been conspicuous by her absence on Firstline on Friday morning.

This is odd behaviour in the middle of a leadership campaign, especially when Jacinda is apparently her ticket‚Äôs trump card. ¬† Read more »

Is extradition to Germany actually Kim Dotcom’s card get out of jail free card?

monopoly-get-out-of-jail-free

There has been a lot of speculation about whether or not Kim Dotcom may be extradited if his residency is revoked for lying on his application.

There is also debate about where he would be sent to.

Some say Hong Kong as that is where he moved from to live in New Zealand….or to Germany…or to Finland….he holds passports in both of the latter jurisdictions.

Then you have to query David ‘Tainted’ Fisher’s expose…surely he knew about this already when he launched his dictated hagiography that he tried (and failed) to claim was work of journalism.

Could it perhaps be that ‘Tainted’ Fisher wrote the article to actually assist Kim Dotcom escaping justice by fleeing back to Germany? ¬†¬† Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Survivors gaze at photographer Margaret Bourke-White and rescuers from the United States Third Army during the liberation of Buchenwald, April 1945.

Survivors gaze at photographer Margaret Bourke-White and rescuers from the United States Third Army during the liberation of Buchenwald, April 1945.

Behind the Picture: The Liberation of Buchenwald, April 1945

Read more »

Hawkes Bay Regional Council only invites people who agree with them over dodgy socialist dam

The Hawkes Bay Regional Council is holding a public meeting next week, but they don;t want any dissenters, just approved speakers who will toe the party line in waxing lyrical about their dodgy dam.

They have banned one economic from speaking about the economics of the dam because he doesn’t agree with with their¬†rubbish calculations.

An economist who questions the viability of the Ruataniwha Dam will not be invited to speak at a seminar for farmers considering signing up to take water from the irrigation scheme.

Irrigation New Zealand and Federated Farmers are running the seminar in Waipawa next Tuesday.

Irrigation NZ chief executive Andrew Curtis said he would “politely decline” a request from a long-time critic of the Ruataniwha water storage scheme, Transparent Hawke’s Bay, for economist Peter Fraser to be given an opportunity to speak at the event.

Mr Fraser, a Wellington-based consultant and former dairy issues adviser at the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, recently wrote a paper that concluded there was “no economic or commercial rationale to proceed with” the Ruataniwha scheme.

But the analysis Mr Fraser’s paper is based on has been rejected by Hawke’s Bay Regional Investment Company (HBRIC) and others associated with the Ruataniwha project who say it relies on a number of incorrect assumptions.

Read more »