ACT

Personal message from Sean Fitzpatrick – ACT Candidate, Ohariu

I’ve been asked to post this personal statement from Sean, and under the circumstances, I’m happy to do so

Hi Cameron,

I have already sent this info to you via facebook, however to be thorough I am emailing you as well.

I just want to let you know that I do not at all support the BDS campaign to boycott Israeli business and investments. As someone who is on record as being very pro-Israel it disturbs me greatly that I am being associated with this sort of thing.

I have set the record straight with the NBR and also on my facebook page. I have received a lot of very positive and encouraging messages of support for this from folk in the NZ Jewish Council. They understand how mendacious this group is by presenting themselves as one thing but promoting quite a different agenda.

I have asked them to delete my name from their list of supporters and rest assured will be raising hell if they do not. Read more »

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Poverty on the rise, income gap widening? Nope. Just a left mantra without a basis in fact

I have to admit, ACT are actually doing what the media should be doing – researching opposition claims and countering them with hard facts.  Try this one on for size:

“A Roy Morgan poll shows that the issue people are most concerned about is income inequality. This just goes to show how the persistent repetition of a lie bewilders the public. Income inequality is not in fact rising. And the child poverty rate has been declining for nearly 20 years, falling from 35% in 1994 to 16% in 2007 and recently returning to pre-global financial crisis levels in 2012” said Dr Whyte.

“Those who advocate socialism have exploited the public’s concern about a rising number of people being trapped into a cycle of dependency. The Left’s repeated claims that New Zealand is getting more unequal are simply false and divert attention from policies that would help people out of dependency.

“Prior to the recent recession, there were 15 years of steady growth in median household incomes driven, in part, by the steady increase in the number of two-parent households where both parents are in paid employment (3% pa).

qwewew

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2014: The year the media stole the election

ACT’s The Letter, as usual, is on point

Readers are asking why the parliamentary press gallery is continuing to parrot Nicky Hager’s absurd claims.

The media has invested so much of their credibility in the story – printing silly statements like “National hacked Labour’s website” (No they did not, Labour left it open).

“John Key is lying”. (Key is telling the truth say the head of the SIS, the Ombudsman and John Key’s diary showing the PM was in Hawaii).

All the dump of emails and texts show is why Judith Collins is called Crusher. Labour has Trevor Mallard, National has Judith Collins.

It is now too much for reporters to say “Actually there was no story. The emails show how clean New Zealand politics is.

There was nothing wrong with Judith Collins telling the name of a civil servant and his government supplied telephone numbers.

Journalists ask politicians for the name of the person in charge and their contact numbers every day. In an open society we are entitled to know”

Having said for 10 days “This is very damaging to John Key” the media feels they must make sure it is damaging.

Q&A even put up Winston Peters to say it is “a new low”. You have run out of credible commentators when Winston of Owen Glenn and missing donations fame is your authority.

I hate to say this, but people don’t care.   This is all beltway egos driving this trainwreck.  Ironically, doing the very thing they accuse me of:  manipulating political outcome.   Read more »

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Politicians who resort to using courts to bully broadcasters deserve what they get

Colin Craig is a bully.

He uses the law to try to silence critics, and now he has gone to court to bully TV3, a private company, to force them to have him on their minor party debate show.

Conservatives leader Colin Craig has won an eleventh-hour High Court scrap over his exclusion from a televised political debate.

TV3’s political show The Nation did not invite Mr Craig to a minor parties debate tomorrow morning, which will include the Green Party, New Zealand First, the Maori Party, Act, Mana and United Future.

Mr Craig filed urgent legal proceedings with the High Court at Auckland today and his application for an interim injunction to restrict the screening of the debate without him was heard this afternoon.

Justice Murray Gilbert sided with the Conservative Party leader saying any inconvenience to MediaWorks was outweighed by the public interest in having Mr Craig at the debate.

The debate cannot legally go ahead without his inclusion.

MediaWorks confirmed that rather than scrap tomorrow’s debate, they would include Mr Craig.

“We’ll have to somehow squeeze him in,” said director of news Mark Jennings.

But The Nation’s Tim Watkin said the production values of the show would suffer as a result.

Each political leader will get less than five minutes to speak because of the late inclusion, he said.

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So, turns out, ACT is still a farce

A while ago I wrote an article on why I no longer vote ACT.  On paper I am an ACT voter.  But I have found two basic problems with it over the years.  One, I, among other ACT voters, probably let a Labour Government sneak in by not voting for National.  And two, the infighting and basic lack of skill of its personnel have been plain for all to see.

Jamie Whyte has been signaled as ACTs savior.  The ‘resurrector’ of the ACT party.

It all didn’t start out very well when he philosophically mused about cousins marrying cousins… which, incidentally, would align with ACT’s principles of staying out of people’s lives.  But it showed a political immaturity that knocked him down before the bell for the first round had even rung.

I do think the voters as well as the media gave ACT and Jamie a chance to redeem themselves.   A process that was hard going but progressing in the right direction.

Until this week.

Act leader Jamie Whyte says his speech outlining his party’s opposition to the legal privilege it claims Maori enjoy should have come as no surprise to anybody, least of all Dunedin North candidate Guy McCallum, who has quit over the matter.

Mr McCallum yesterday confirmed Otago University student magazine Critic’s report he had resigned from Act’s board and as Dunedin North candidate over the speech and was considering resigning his membership. He also told the Herald others in the party were uncomfortable with the “one-law-for-all” policy articulated by Dr Whyte. Read more »

Is ACT’s Jamie Whyte a racist after all?

On the face of it, he got a raw deal when he said that there should be one law for all.   But then something odd happened.  Adam Bennett and Jeremy Rees report:

An ACT party candidate and board member has reportedly resigned over his leader’s speech on race.

Dunedin North candidate, Guy McCallum, told Otago University student magazine Critic that Jamie Whyte had told ACT members he was searching for “a stunt…..because you know, the polls.”

Dr Whyte told ACT’s Waikato conference on July 29 that Act would establish a taskforce to root out and repeal laws giving special treatment to Maori.

“The principle that the law should be impartial has never been fully embraced in New Zealand,” he said.

His comments attracted criticism, in particular from Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy.

Mr McCallum stood for Act in Dunedin North in 2011 and has been a member of Act on Campus since 2010 and its vice President since 2012.

He told Critiche was “blindsided” by Dr Whyte’s comments but had been given some indication the party leader was planning to court controversy.

This just makes no sense to me at all.   Read more »

The Letter on Epsom and Media bias

The reason John Key said last week “I am encouraging Epsom voters to support he ACT candidate” is because in the latest Roy Morgan poll ACT winning Epsom makes John Key PM.  

It is the same reason Internet Party leader Laila Harre and John Minto have urged their supporters to vote National to defeat David Seymour. 

After wondering why John Key has not done a deal with the Conservatives, Colin Craig  then tries to help Labour in Epsom.  John Key did look hard at an accommodation with the Conservatives but decided the fruit loops are unelectable. If Colin Craig had door knocked on 10,000 doors in East Coast Bays, like David Seymour has done in Epsom, the answer might have been different.  If Colin had not told us all that it is a “no brainer” Christine Rankin would stand in Upper Harbour against Hon Paula Bennett, then we might not think it is brainless for her to stand in Epsom. 

By Writ Day she will be the candidate for Mangere.   

The whole show is run by an egocentric political amateur.  If he really wanted to make change, he should have realised by now that getting the right people in the job would have been much more effective than trying to be the Conservative Winston Peters.

Because Winston Peters he is not.  He doesn’t have the wit, the street smarts, the aura and the most basic knowledge to survive in the political arena.

In fact, had Colin Craig put all that money into a trust and put someone in place to manage it for the benefit of children, or education, or specific research, he would have done much more for the community.  As it is, he’s made ad agencies, pollsters and printers very very happy.   Read more »

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ACT still on National life support – Whyte to take on safe National seat

ACT Party leader Jamie Whyte is going to stand in Pakuranga for the September general election.

He says he’s going to campaign for the party vote only and use his candidate status to get ACT’s policies across to voters.

“Those policies will go a long way to making Pakuranga more prosperous and its streets and homes safer,” he said.

“A low flat tax, getting tough on crime, and one country, one law.”

Pakuranga is one of the safest National seats in the country.

Maurice Williamson retained it with a 13,846 majority in 2011.

You could theorise this two ways   Read more »

ACT education policy may suit National as Parata wants more charter schools

Sophia Duckor-Jones at ZB reported

Education minister Hekia Parata says the government’s considering a second round of charter schools.

The comment comes after an announcement from the ACT Party which wants state schools to be able to elect to become a charter school.

Ms Parata says the government has commissioned an evaluation of the model before they can make any further decisions.

ACT’s policy won’t be popular with the PPTA – as it is opt-in bulk funding by another name

ACT made the establishment of partnership schools a condition of its confidence and supply agreement with the National-led government, and it now wants to extend the policy.

Leader Jamie Whyte unveiled the party’s education policy in a speech today, saying all school boards should be able to opt out of control by the Ministry of Education and be bulk funded according to the number of students they attract.

“This policy entails no additional government spending,” he said.

Five partnership schools were opened this year and another five are expected to open in 2015.

“These few schools come under constant attack for being additional to the current stock of state schools and therefore reducing the funds available to them.

“The answer is to give all state schools the option of becoming partnership schools,” he said.

The policy will give teachers freedom to adapt their methods to their students and schools the freedom to innovate.

I wonder what ACT will take into any coalition talks as their number one policy.  It will probably be this one.

- NZN

When you pay more tax under a Labour government, you will merely be returning what was theirs in the first place

Jamie Whyte draws attention to something about New Zealanders:  that we’re in some kind of hostage situation with our governments, and that we are definitely suffering from Stockholm Syndrome.

I was interviewed on Radio NZ’s Morning Report by Guyon Espiner. He asked why ACT wanted to give money to well off New Zealanders. I replied that we were giving them nothing. On the contrary, we were planning to take 24% of their incomes from them.

Espiner apparently believes that all income really belongs to the state, and that any it allows you to keep is its gift to you. When you are taxed at 33%, you should not see this as having something taken from you; you should see the 67% that you keep as a gift from the government. How else could Espiner think that a government that reduces tax rates has thereby given people money?

It is fortunate that a man with such ideas is only a journalist, you may think. Alas, some of our most important politicians agree with Espiner. David Cunliffe yesterday announced Labour’s plan to increase the top rate of income tax. According to the Herald, Cunliffe said the tax hikes would mean wealthier New Zealanders being asked to “return a small part of the very large tax cuts they received from the current Government”.

Those successive years of Helen Clark have left a foul stain on the nation’s psyche as its ‘children’ keep looking at the government to take care of it.   Read more »