advertising

Introductory Offer – WhaleOil sidebar banners

qfaqwNew Zealand’s most read blog,WhaleOil.co.nz, has an audience of more than 150,000 unique visitors who consume more than two and a half million pages of content every month.

To help advertisers connect with this audience, we’re introducing some new sidebar banners that will appear on every page of the site and remain sticky at the top of the page when readers scroll.

There are three options available:

1: Top banner: 300×125 pixels(One available))
Cost: $599 ex GST per month
Book this banner

2: Second row banner: 150×150 pixels (Two available)
Cost: $399 ex GST per month
Book this banner

3: Third and fourth row banners: 150×150 pixels (Four available)
Cost: $299 ex GST per month
Book this banner

As an introductory offer, if you book and pay for two months, we’ll give you a third month free.

We also provide banner design if required.

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I know some of you would like to support Whaleoil but would like to do that through your business so you get a nice invoice for it.  This is a great chance to assist Whaleoil and ensure it keeps doing the job it’s doing and at the same time raise the profile of your company, service or special offer.

Please contact Digital Ads and discuss your needs.  We can also design a campaign around your specific requirements – no need to fit it in the ad space being offered above.

Without being dramatic, the finance side of Whaleoil is tight, and this is a great way to help us continue while you get to write it off as a legitimate business expense as well as raise your profile to our readers.

Tit for tat media war erupts in wake of Oborne resignation

When Peter Oborne left The Telegraph and outed their compromised and corrupted newsrom hiding stories a few other media outlets jumped in for the kicking.

But the tables have turned in a tit for tat war that is breaking out over media ethics, with accusations now besetting the Guardian.

The Guardian is facing questions over its relationship with advertisers after allegations that it changed a news article amid concerns about offending Apple.

The media organisation has criticised The Telegraph for failing to observe the “Chinese wall” between advertising and editorial coverage, a claim The Telegraph strongly denies.

However, The Telegraph can disclose that in July last year Apple bought wraparound advertising on The Guardian’s website and stipulated that the advertising should not be placed next to negative news.

A Guardian insider said that the headline of an article about Iraq on The Guardian’s website was changed amid concerns about offending Apple, and the article was later removed from the home page entirely.

The insider said: “If editorial staff knew what was happening here they would be horrified.”The Guardian declined to comment on the specific allegation, but said: “It is never the case that editorial content is changed to meet stipulations made by an advertiser.   Read more »

The ‘unassisted suicide’ of old media

Andrew Sullivan ceases blogging today, and one of his final posts is a discussion of modern media developments by old media companies.

CBC interviewed him about native advertising:

Sullivan’s case against native advertisement is powerful and succinct. “It is advertising that is portraying itself as journalism, simple as that,” he told me recently. “It is an act of deception of the readers and consumers of media who believe they’re reading the work of an independent journalist.”

Advertisers, he says, want to buy the integrity built up over decades by journalists and which, in the past, was kept at arm’s length. Now they will happily pay to imitate it: “The whole goal is you not being able to tell the difference.” Sullivan’s argument is so doctrinaire, so principled, that it makes bourgeois practitioners of the craft, like me, squirm.

Read more »

Dirty Politics advertising opportunities

Lemons-lemonade

Here at Whaleoil we are very big on turning lemons into lemonade. Dirty politics is now a well known brand so I have turned my devious mind towards how best to turn it to advertisers advantage.

First up any products that get dirty would benefit from the Dirty Politics brand or any products that clean up dirt. Not that I can imagine Cameron promoting a vacuum cleaner but maybe if it was a Dyson.

I personally want a hot tub for outside so think that Cameron would be the perfect spokesperson for a hot tub company. He not only lands in hot water regularly, he revels in it. Cut to Cam relaxing in a steaming hot tub looking very pleased with himself while texting the Prime Minister or being interviewed by a harried looking MSM reporter.

Read more »

Inappropriate Ads

Since APN subsumed NewstalkZB it seems they have caught the Herald disease.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo via: Paolo Fissore, “La pubblicità mette le ruote”, Automobile Club Cuneo, Savigliano 2004. Shoe-shaped car advertising Ebano polish, by Grazia bodyshop in Bologna.

Photo via: Paolo Fissore, “La pubblicità mette le ruote”, Automobile Club Cuneo, Savigliano 2004. Shoe-shaped car advertising Ebano polish, by Grazia bodyshop in Bologna.

Ads on Wheels

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Why is Whaleoil soaring and the MSM just holding on? See if you can work it out

…Publishers and editors have only themselves to blame for failing to connect with the Millennial generation that they – and most of their advertisers – covet the most.

The inability of newspapers to resonate with digital natives has left them with a daunting demographic challenge. Two-thirds of the audience at the typical newspaper is composed of people over the age of 55, according to Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates. “The newspaper audience ages another year every year,” he adds. “Everyone’s hair ought to be on fire.”

As the newspaper audience grays, the readers that newspapers – and most of their advertisers – would like to have are, instead, busily racking up page views [elsewhere].

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Missouri reported that only 29% of newspaper publishers conducted focus groups prior to putting paywalls around the digital products that most profess to be the future of their franchises.

Instead of talking with their intended consumers, fully 85% of respondents to the survey said they asked other publishers what they thought about erecting barriers around the content that they had been freely providing for the better part of two decades.

While paywalls boosted revenues at most newspapers because they were accompanied by stiff increases in print subscription rates, the tactic gave the growing population of digital natives – and non-readers of every other age – the best reason yet for not engaging with newspapers.

Of course, newspapers were losing Millenials well before they started feverishly erecting paywalls in the last few years. But what if publishers and editors had begun studying the needs and attitudes of the emerging generation from the early days of the Millenium? Could the outcomes have been more positive?

In the interests of tuning into the thinking of those elusive twenty- and thirty-somethings, a newspaper client recently brought a panel of them to a strategy session. Here is what we learned: Read more »

Is Native Advertising destroying journalism?

Andrew Sullivan seems to think that native advertising most certainly is destroying journalism.

He comments on Ezra Klein’s Vox project raising $110 million over recent years and their stated business plans.

If the new media brands that have emerged over the last couple of years were described (accurately) as new advertising agencies, the stories might not have had as much traction (or contained as much hope for the future of journalism). But that, it is quite clear, is what most of these new entities are. Vox has now dropped any pretensions that it is not becoming an ad agency, creating “articles” that perpetuate and distribute the marketing strategies of major corporations.

The logic of this, from a business standpoint, is so powerful almost no one can resist it. Display or banner advertising is sinking into an after-thought, leaving journalism with a huge revenue crisis – especially when you have no subscription income from readers. And when you’re drowning in venture capital, the pressure to to find a way to pay it back eventually must, even now, be crushing. There’s no other explanation for the fullscale surrender of journalism to what would, only five years ago, have been universally understood as blatant corruption.

What always amazes me about the interviews with the various media professionals involved is their use of the English language. It’s close to impenetrable to anyone outside the industry – e.g. “publishers have to get better with understanding the product side of native” – which, of course, helps to disguise the wholesale surrender of journalism to public relations. What also amazes me is how silent the actual editors of these sites are on the core, and once-deemed-unethical, foundation of their entire business. So we’re unlikely to hear Ezra explain to his liberal readers how he’s now engaged in the corporate propaganda business. But if you scan the interview with Vox‘s new fake article guru, Lindsay Nelson, some truths slip out. To wit:

You’re going to need to be great storytellers and create things that help advertisers with the goals that they have for that quarter … We’re trying to become a consulting partner, where we help brands and guide them to develop a content marketing strategy that is 12-months long … If there’s something in the news that a brand wants to be close to you can get them up and running with the same type of polish that they would expect from advertising that takes much longer.

So even breaking news may well be advertising in the near future. And good luck telling the difference.

Read more »

Herald busted over native advertising

Have you read The NZ Herald and their 12 questions series?

What about the constant featuring of their Brand insights and the strange articles about people attending the University of Auckland MBA course?

Well wonder no more.

It is actually undisclosed paid advertising masquerading as journalism and boy are they happy about the results.

After my posts of yesterday this turned up on the tipline.

To: [REDACTED]
Subject: UABS and NZ Herald Partnership

Colleagues

As many of you will be aware, the Business School has been involved in running a marketing partnership with the New Zealand Herald over the past few months which we drove through the Graduate School of Management.  The New Zealand Herald took our programme into their Brand Insights initiative  around 2 months ago and the analytics have without doubt proven the campaign to be a success. The partnership delivered a mix of contributed articles from academics, a weekly blog from one of our current MBA students Sarah Stuart (well known NZ journalist, ex Deputy Editor of the Herald on Sunday and Editor of Woman’s weekly as well as the face of the Herald’s 12 questions series) and a video series using Sarah’s well known 12 questions format. We were also able to run advertising  for specific events for the MBA programme or promote Executive Education courses as part of the campaign page. The partnership ran over 6 months (we are finalising our last two videos at this time featuring Professor Kaj Storbacka and Dr Lester Levy and our final 3 contributed articles will run by mid Nov). Some highlights from the analytics of our campaign without going into pages of detail or graph overload show that the content was engaging, on average the blogs achieved excellent readership (unique views on some blogs hit well over 5,000 and on the aggregator over half a million impressions).  Average time spent reading the blogs was 3 minutes, similar time was spent on the videos and on the contributed articles.  When the content aggregator was used, naturally the blogs and articles were more prominent on the site.

The link below will take you to our page where you can view some of Sarah’s blogs and our academic staff contributed articles:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/universityofauckland/news/headlines.cfm?c_id=1503679

And this link will take you to an example of one of the videos:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/video.cfm?c_id=1503079&gal_cid=1503079&gallery_id=144775

Through analysis we were able to determine that the campaign drove traffic to the GSM website directly from the NZ Herald and those that visited the site were looking at between 2 to 6 pages after landing, suggesting a genuine interest in the programme, the requirements etc.  Read more »

Does John Drinnan actually read what he writes?

John Drinnan is a fool.

His latest column mentions the decision b the Press Council to open up membership finally to online media.

This is interesting because in current proceedings before the Human Rights Review Tribunal I have told I can’t be a journalist because i’m not a member of a voluntary regime like the Press Council, but the lawyer ignored the problem that until last week I couldn’t possibly join because their constitution wouldn’t allow it.

I also had to battle that premise int eh High Court, but fortunately Justice Asher saw through that attempt, not so you would know it from the perspective of the Human Rights Commission.

The idea of expanding the Press Council’s reach has been around for years and was given a boost after the Law Commission suggested digital media should join a combined media standards organisation, in return for receiving legal protections available to journalists. Then Justice Minister Judith Collins – a close friend of Slater – quashed that plan.

However the Press Council has since gone ahead with a scheme to represent digital media and blogs under its own steam, and that was unveiled this week.

But the ethics of bloggers and the media in general have come under deep scrutiny since Dirty Politics was published. Neville said it was clear in Press Council rules that publishers could not be paid for editorial.

“There is a grey area now with so-called native advertising, which is meant to be quality journalism which stacks up on its journalistic merits, even though it is sympathetic to one party.”

There were questions about whether the Press Council should have jurisdiction over native content, or if that should be covered by the Advertising Standards Authority.

Dirty Politics author Nicky Hager said the Press Council was getting into complex waters judging digital media on the basis of individuals rather than articles, and deciding whether they were journalism or not.

“My fear would be what could happen is that unscrupulous blogs could be given credibility but not end up with any accountability.

“Sometimes people are publishing public relations, and sometimes journalism,” he said.

Read more »