advertising

Do disclaimers on native advertising work?

As the NZ Herald and Fairfax move to extend their already considerable investment in native advertising, the advertising made to look like journalism, there is growing evidence that their disclaimers don’t work.

The disclaimers are what news executives like Tim Murphy and Shayne Currie use to justify their extension of native advertising.

While publishers are producing and running sponsored content in greater numbers, one thing they haven’t figured out is how to effectively label their output. Some publishers are particularly overt about it, while others are content with making readers work a little bit harder. And no one’s quite sure which approach works best.

The real challenge is that a lot of those disclosures may not be all that effective. A new study from analytics platform Nudge found that the most common native ad disclosures are actually the least effective at helping readers identify their content as ads. Sponsored content using disclosure techniques like the home page buyout (used, for example, by The Wall Street Journal) and the persistent disclosure banner (used by Slate) were only identified as ads by readers 29 percent of the time.

In contrast, Nudge found that over half of the 100 people it polled were able to to identify ads that featured disclosures within the content itself. In-content disclosures are rare compared to the other techniques, though.

Nudge’s conclusion: Some publishers may be going out of their way to label sponsored content, but readers are barely noticing them, thanks to banner blindness and small labeling. Ben Young, CEO of Nudge, said that this is more than publishers staying honest in the eyes of the FTC. Bad disclosure can actually hurt brands, too. “Effective disclosures mean effective brand recall,” he said.

[...]    Read more »

Banned from New Zealand television, why?

Why is this banned?

Was it because the ute was too dirty?

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Claim: Image from a 1979 Pakistan airline advertisement shows the shadow of a jetliner on the World Trade Center.

Claim: Image from a 1979 Pakistan airline advertisement shows the shadow of a jetliner on the World Trade Center.

1979 Pakistan Airline Advertisement

Read more »

Hypocrisy and the NZ Herald

hypocrites

A reader writes about the NZ Herald’s paid content…you know that terrible thing John Drinnan has been campaigning on Twitter against…ringing people’s bosses trying to get them sacked.

brand insightHi Cam

I was browsing through the Herald online (I know – more fool, me – in my defence, I only read it for the girlie pictures) and came across the new Brand Insight section (launched September 1 and now featured prominently on the front page).

What is a “Brand Insight”? According to the helpful explanatory popup, it’s this: “New Zealand Herald’s Brand Insight connects readers directly to the leadership thinking of many prominent companies and organisations.”

Sounds terribly worthy, doesn’t it?

Or you could click through to one of the stories, where you’ll find in the small print that Brand Insights are in fact paid content, published on behalf of an advertiser. In a nutshell, this is the Herald’s latest attempt to extract money from advertisers, in what’s called a “native advertising format” (or, as we oldtimers call it, advertorial).

“The high quality content, in line with journalistic standards, is often produced by the company or brand and must be of interest to readers. It is clearly signposted.” Yeah, right.

So how exactly is this different from what WOBH has allegedly been doing, accepting money from companies in return for writing about them?

Oh yeah, “clearly signposted”. Like, “connects readers directly to the leadership thinking of many prominent companies and organisations”.

Sure, that’ll do it.

Read more »

Voters dislike negative campaigning…or do they?

The video above was the first attack ad…simple yet effective. It started the war of negative advertising.

Fifty years ago—on the night of Monday, Sept. 7, 1964—an innocent little girl plucking flower petals in a sun-splashed field helped usher in a revolution in American political advertising. The 60-second television spot that featured her disjointed counting exploded, literally and figuratively, all notions of what it meant to effectively persuade voters with paid political advertising.

The little girl counted as she plucked flower petals. Unseen birds chirped happily. As her counting ended, viewers suddenly heard a mission control announcer begin a countdown. As he neared zero, the girl’s image froze as the camera zoomed into her right eye until her pupil filled the screen and was replaced by a nuclear blast and mushroom cloud. As the apocalyptic scene unfolded, President Lyndon Johnson’s reedy drawl entered the spot, ending with the admonition, “we must either love each other or we must die.”

The so-called “Daisy Girl” spot created by Johnson’s New York advertising firm aired only once as a paid commercial during the 1964 presidential campaign. An estimated 50 million voters saw it during NBC’s “Monday Night at the Movies”—the film was “David and Bathsheba.” Another 50 million or more saw it again, or for the first time, later that week when the three television networks aired the unique, powerful spot in their newscasts.

Read more »

The Herald and their Whaling Crusade

An email from a reader.


I’ve been following your ongoing stoushes with the Herald with interest. What’s been puzzling me for some time is why the Powers That Be at the Herald would allow their employees to keep putting the paper’s reputation at risk by publishing what can only be described as tabloid journalism.

Part of the reason, I concluded, is that the paper’s owners, APN, are safely offshore, across the Tasman, and happy to allow business as usual as long as the money keeps flowing.

So is it? I compared the oldest earnings report I could find, pre-APN-ownership (1999), when Tony O’Reilly’s Independent Media Ireland reported earnings from NZ operations of 28 million Euros EBITDA (approx. NZ$56 million at the exchange rate at the time).

Last fiscal, APN reported NZ EBITDA of A$53 million (call it NZ$59 million).

So – earnings up 5% in 15 years. Not great, but no doubt it looks pretty good in the context of a disintegrating newspaper industry.

So how is the Herald (the largest single item in the APN NZ portfolio) managing to sustain this revenue stream?

I’ll let you into a little secret: it’s not from circulation revenues. I’ve compiled a year-by-year chart of the Herald’s circulation over the last 15 years (the numbers aren’t perfect because the newspaper industry is quick to sweep its past under the rug, preferring that you focus only on the last couple of years of numbers, not see them in historical context — but Google is my friend, enabling me to find at least one number for each year).

herald-circulation Read more »

Couldn’t Labour find a NZ classroom for their photos?

The NZEI are staunch supporters of the Labour party, even helping them write their education policy.

You would think that Labour would have been easily able to source a Kiwi classroom image for their election messaging wouldn’t you?

Here is David Cunliffe pushing his lie about removing school fees.

The background photo isn’t from a Kiwi classroom.   Read more »

Increasing business by kicking the RSA in the shins? I don’t think so

Mohamed Hassan reports on a business running derogatory radio ads about the RSA

A “tongue-in-cheek” radio advertisement about RSA food has prompted anger at an Auckland bar.

The Ponsonby Social Club was accused of making “untrue and defamatory statements”, following an ad campaign claiming the food provided at Returned Serviceman’s Associations was less than desirable.

The ad, which ended its run six weeks ago, said food at the venue was “kinda like the RSA, but without the chewy meat and overboiled veges”.

A listener filed a complaint to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) defending the quality of the food served at RSA establishments, and saying the advertisement was offensive.

Ponsonby Social Club said it was “surprised” by the complaint, because it intended the ad to be “tongue-in-cheek”and did not expect anyone to be offended.

It had moved on to a different campaign, and would not be running the ad again, it said.

What next?  Picking on kindergartens and Age Concern socials?  What’s wrong with these people?   Read more »

This is the post that Travis dreads every month

First of the month means we get to look at our “ratings” for the previous month and do a bit of self promotion.  And like any decent Kiwi bloke, Travis hates it.  Just score the try and walk humbly back to the 22 and wait for the conversion looking stoic and staunch.

So to help Travis and all the other Pinetree Meads types out, let’s not go on about how we’re first, and how Whaleoil does more visits and pageviews by itself than the next 200 odd blogs added up.  (oops – there I go again).

sks

That’s a familiar picture.  However, let’s look up, instead of down.   Read more »

Creative advertising can still break down barriers