America

Where have all the Heroes gone?

John Wayne

John Wayne

The America of my Dad’s generation was represented in Movies by men like John Wayne.

No would ever imagine John Wayne giving in to threats or backing down.

If Sony was to be represented in a movie I would have to cast Pee-wee Herman, as their recent actions have been anything but courageous.

Pee-wee Herman

Pee-wee Herman

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Thomas Hoepker

Photo: Thomas Hoepker

Photographs Can Speak A Thousand Words, But Without A Narrative Device Framing Them, They Are Mute

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: JOEL STERNFELD. McLean Virginia, December 4, 1978. Sternfeld, born in 1944 is famous for his large-format documentary pictures, Joel is a fine-art colour photographer whom for most of his career spent his time documenting the United States of America, his book American Prospects (published in 1987) showcases his talent for colour photographs swell as giving the audience an insight into his concern for the social condition of America at that time.

Photo: JOEL STERNFELD. McLean Virginia, December 4, 1978.
Sternfeld, born in 1944 is famous for his large-format documentary pictures, Joel is a fine-art colour photographer whom for most of his career spent his time documenting the United States of America, his book American Prospects (published in 1987) showcases his talent for colour photographs swell as giving the audience an insight into his concern for the social condition of America at that time.

Pumpkin Shopping

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Muslims trying to reform Islam from within are silenced by the left

After reading this I have had to revise my opinion on followers of Islam. Clearly there are those who want to reform it and ironically it is the West and the left who are preventing them from doing so. I still do not support an ideology dreamed up by a Pedophile but anyone that wants to try to drag it kicking and screaming out of the dark ages must have my support. A shark is still a shark and I don’t want to get into the water with it but anyone who wants to try to put a muzzle on it or try to teach it to be a vegetarian has my respect.

Why is criticism of Islam forbidden?

There is apparently no amount of mass murder, no number of innocents tortured or women raped, no amount of female degradation, no number of people enslaved, no number of Christians expelled from or murdered in the Middle East, no amount of Nazi-like Jew-hatred in its societies, no number of beheadings or even crucifixions, and no amount of terror that allows criticism of Islam.

And why is this?

A major Egyptian writer, Aly Salem, who has written 22 plays and 15 books, gave the answer in the Wall Street Journal this week.

His answer: The left.

“Many of my fellow Muslims are trying to reform Islam from within. Yet our voices are smothered in the West by Islamist apologists and their well-meaning but unwitting allies on the left. For instance, if you try to draw attention to the stark correlation between the rise of Islamic religiosity and regressive attitudes toward women, you’re labeled an Islamophobe.

“In America, other contemporary ideologies are routinely and openly debated in classrooms, newspapers, on talk shows and in living rooms. But Americans make an exception for Islamism. Criticism of the religion — even in abstraction — is conflated with bigotry toward Muslims. There is no public discourse, much less an ideological response, to Islamism, in academia or on Capitol Hill. …

My own experience as a Muslim in New York bears this out. Socially progressive, self-proclaimed liberals, who would denounce even the slightest injustice committed against women or minorities in America, are appalled when I express a similar criticism about my own community. …

“This is delusional thinking. Even as the world witnesses the barbarity of beheadings, habitual stoning and severe subjugation of women and minorities in the Muslim world, politicians and academics lecture that Islam is a ‘religion of peace.’ ”

Still from the film, The Stoning of Soraya, which was based on a true story.

Still from the film, The Stoning of Soraya, which was based on a true story.

 

Coincidentally, on the same day this article appeared, I had an hour-long dialogue on my radio show with another Muslim who made the identical point: that the left prevents honest discussion of Islam. Dr. Zuhdi Jasser is not only a Muslim, but a believing and practicing one. Despite fatwas issued calling for his death, this courageous Muslim continues to work to fundamentally transform his religion. (It is worth recalling President Barack Obama’s famous pledge right before the 2008 election to “fundamentally transform the United States of America.” If a Muslim wishes to fundamentally transform Islam, he is labeled an “Islamophobe,” but if an American wishes to fundamentally transform America, he is not considered an America-phobe; he is merely another Democrat.)

Jasser is a medical doctor who practices in Arizona. He is a Navy veteran who reminds people that America embodies better values than any Muslim country. He wants Muslims and Islam to adopt American political, social and moral values. He wants, in a nutshell, a Muslim Reformation.

Yet, aside from Fox News and talk radio, both of them conservative media, one rarely encounters Jasser on national radio or television. Instead the mainstream — that is, liberal — media feature Muslim spokesmen from organizations such as CAIR (the Council on American-Islamic Relations), apologists for Islam and Islamists.

None of this is about bigotry against Muslims. There are hundreds of millions of non-Islamist Muslims (an Islamist is a Muslim who seeks to impose Shariah on others), including many “cultural” or secular Muslims. And individual Muslims are risking their lives every day to provide the intelligence needed to forestall terror attacks in America and elsewhere.

-Eliyokim Cohen

 

 

Photo Of The Day

Photograph by Ralph Crane for LIFE Magazine

Photograph by Ralph Crane for LIFE Magazine

The Real Jessica Rabbit

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Photo Of The Day

Ma Barker and her Thompson gun in an undated picture of the legendary matriarch. Ma Barker had four sons: Herman, Lloyd, Arthur and Fred, who, with Alvin Karpis, formed the Barker-Karpis Gang in 1931. That year, Fred and Alvin shot a sheriff to death. The murder started a pattern of thoughtless killing by the gang. Ma Barker became a wanted woman.

Ma Barker and her Thompson gun in an undated picture of the legendary matriarch. Ma Barker had four sons: Herman, Lloyd, Arthur and Fred, who, with Alvin Karpis, formed the Barker-Karpis Gang in 1931. That year, Fred and Alvin shot a sheriff to death. The murder started a pattern of thoughtless killing by the gang. Ma Barker became a wanted woman.

Ma Barker

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Photo Of The Day

© JIM MARSHALL PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC. San Francisco, 1968.  1965 TYPE 356 C: The 356 was Porsche’s first production model and had a nearly two-decade run as both a closed coupe and a convertible. This particular car is from the model’s last year of production and features a decidedly non-factory paint scheme, created at the request of famed singer Janis Joplin, who bought the car used and had it customized by a roadie for her band, Big Brother and the Holding Company. Apparently her friends were not the only ones who all drove Porsches.

© JIM MARSHALL PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC. San Francisco, 1968.
1965 TYPE 356 C: The 356 was Porsche’s first production model and had a nearly two-decade run as both a closed coupe and a convertible. This particular car is from the model’s last year of production and features a decidedly non-factory paint scheme, created at the request of famed singer Janis Joplin, who bought the car used and had it customized by a roadie for her band, Big Brother and the Holding Company. Apparently her friends were not the only ones who all drove Porsches.

“On stage, I make love to 25,000 different people, then I go home alone.”

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Ben Tesch Edith Macefield's old blue car still sits in front of the home she refused to sell to developers, even when they offered $1 million

Photo: Ben Tesch
Edith Macefield’s old blue car still sits in front of the home she refused to sell to developers, even when they offered $1 million

The Little Old Woman Who Said NO To Power

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Face of the day

 

Senator Marco Rubio

Senator Marco Rubio

 

Senator for Florida,Marco Rubio, is my face of the day. I want to vote for this guy and I don’t even live in America. If only we had an MP like him here in New Zealand prepared to address the elephant in the room.

I watched his eloquent and heart felt speech yesterday on this blog and was so impressed with him  that I wanted to bring both him and his speech to the attention of those of you who have not yet had the privilege of watching it.

So what is this Rape culture that you speak of?

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Rape culture is a term that was coined by feminists in the United States in the 1970’s. It was designed to show the ways in which society blamed victims of sexual assault and normalized male sexual violence.

I do not believe that NZ has a culture where women get blamed for rape. Not at all. Blaming women for men’s actions is typical of backward Patriarchal countries where women have little power and are forced to dress modestly least they cause men to lose control. India has been in the news lately a lot for that kind of thing. Simply being a woman on a bus without your male relatives to protect you appears to be justification enough for a gang rape over there. Now that is a rape culture!

Is male sexual violence normalised in New Zealand? No it isn’t. No one considers it normal to beat their wife or girlfriend in New Zealand. Yes some do but mainstream New Zealand does not have that view that it is ok or normal, not at all. To not only beat but to also rape, only hard core Gang members or sick Men from Patriarchal countries would ever dare to express the view that that was acceptable.

Emilie Buchwald, author of Transforming a Rape Culture, describes that when society normalizes sexualized violence, it accepts and creates rape culture. In her book she defines rape culture as…..

a complex set of beliefs that encourage male sexual aggression and supports violence against women. It is a society where violence is seen as sexy and sexuality as violent. In a rape culture, women perceive a continuum of threatened violence that ranges from sexual remarks to sexual touching to rape itself. A rape culture condones physical and emotional terrorism against women as the norm . . . In a rape culture both men and women assume that sexual violence is a fact of life, inevitable

Violence sexy? Violence in action movies and online games is directed towards combatants in battle scenarios. Apart from a few exceptions like the car racing game where hookers and drugs were part of the game, violence is depicted in battle against combatants not against women. In films, sex is certainly way more explicit than it used to be. However romance is still popular and I cannot imagine any sex symbol lasting long in the industry if he played a character in a love story who raped or beat his love interest. No one in NZ would find that sexy. They would find it disgusting. Most women in NZ expect respect and love, not violence and the majority of Men in NZ want the same in return.

The website Force: Upsetting the Rape Culture explains how rape culture is the images, language, laws and other everyday phenomena that we see and hear everyday that validate and perpetuate rape.

Rape culture includes jokes, TV, music, advertising, legal jargon, laws, words and imagery, that make violence against women and sexual coercion seem so normal that people believe that rape is inevitable.

– www.wavaw.ca

When was the last time you heard a rape joke? If you are like me it would be never. When people have made rape jokes in America they get attacked on Twitter, on Facebook and in the Media. We have a very politically correct culture in NZ and it is hardly a breeding ground to allow rape jokes, images of rape, or laws that make it easy for a rapist to get off.

Yes, rape happens in New Zealand. Yes, we do have nasty examples of masculinity like the so called Roast Busters. What we do not have is a culture of rape. At least not by the definitions quoted above.