Amy Adams

Labour wants a law that’s flawed, but will fix it once it is in place?

Labour are starting to realise the poison chalice that the Harmful Digital Communications Bill represents.

They are backing away slowly, but in doing so they appear to actually want a flawed Bill and are promising to fix it later.

That would be a fine thing if only they could credibly claim that they have a chance at being the next government.

The Harmful Digital Communications Bill is likely to pass its third reading today, the final step before it is signed into law. It will create a new offence of sending messages or posting material online that were intended to cause harm, and did so.

Another new offence will be incitement to commit suicide in situations where the person does not then attempt to take their own life. Internet service providers or companies such as Facebook or Google could be asked by a New Zealand agency to remove a harmful communication.

Labour has reluctantly supported the bill, but wants a review once it is in place. Communications spokeswoman Clare Curran said in debate that the definition of harm – serious emotional distress – was very broad.

“That is going to have to be tested in the courts to see what it actually means … How long is it going to take before there is a 14 or 15-year-old hauled before the courts?”    Read more »

Is National’s Harmful Digital Communications Bill its own Electoral Finance Act?

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National is a party that supposedly believes in Individual freedom, choice and personal responsibility.

They played heavily on this in defeating Helen Clark’s more authoritarian and nanny state style of government.

Clark ridiculously focused on controlling what light bulbs we should use, changing shower heads in houses to conserve water, which rather abundantly falls from the sky, and their worst law which National shamelessly barely altered upon gaining the treasury benches, the Electoral Finance Act.

The Electoral Finance Act bizarrely had its genesis in Nicky Hager’s book the Hollowmen, which ‘exposed’ dealings National had with the Exclusive Brethren. Labour put up a law that sought to restrict donations to political parties, except their own donations of course.

Somehow it was wrong for New Zealand citizens to donate to political parties, but perfectly OK for large amounts of cash to slosh into Labour coffers from a narcissistic ex-pat Kiwi who made his fortune in managing logistics for tobacco companies.

It was an astonishing attack on freedom of speech, freedom of association and the very things that National stood for, individual freedom, choice and personal responsibility.

National made hay while the sun shone and the Electoral Finance Act became a catalyst for large protests that erupted around the country.

Bernard Darnton, David and I formed the Free Speech Coalition to oppose this law and raised money to put large billboards around that attacked those parties supporting the bill. It worked, and even spooked Peter Dunne from previously supporting the bill to opposing it at the final reading. David Farrar and I were having lunch in Auckland when we received an angry phone call from Rob Eaddy in Peter Dunne’s office abusing us for putting Dunne on one of our billboards. He was politely told to GFY.   a634bc2dd4ea7dcedc21 Read more »

Rat cunning from Amy Adams, Labour will be left staring at goats again

The government has appointed Sir Michael Cullen to head up the first review of New Zealand’s security and intelligence agencies.

A former Deputy Prime Minister and a respected lawyer are to lead the first regular review of New Zealand’s security and intelligence agencies, Acting Attorney-General Amy Adams announced today.

Ms Adams says she intends to appoint Sir Michael Cullen and Dame Patsy Reddy to carry out the review.

“This will be an important and challenging review, and I’m pleased Sir Michael and Dame Patsy have agreed to lend their expertise to the task. They bring complementary skills and experience to the role. Sir Michael is a former member of the Intelligence and Security Committee and has knowledge of national security issues. Dame Patsy has extensive governance experience and legal expertise,” Ms Adams says.

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Concrete Cancer Coverup Ctd: How a real company deals with the problem

unnamedWell, well, well, just look at those headlines. Just an issue that WhaleOil has been talking about for months, yet MSM are only now waking up to the potential scale of the problem.

You see WhaleOil exposed the use of dodgy cement back in October 2014, when cement importing company DRYMIX imported dodgy high alkali cement from Vietnam.

This dodgy cement ended up in places such as the $40 million Manukau District Court rebuild and Fonterra’s $120 million UTH factory in Waitoa.   Read more »

Will the PPTA protest this?

The government has announced a $5.2 million upgrade of Tolaga Bay Area School. Which is on top of its ongoing running costs of $12,500 per student.

Students at Tolaga Bay Area School, East Coast, are set to enjoy a $5.2 million classroom upgrade, Associate Education Minister Nikki Kaye announced today.

“New blocks will be built at the school, to replace four older buildings and classrooms that are no longer fit for purpose,” says Ms Kaye.

“The new blocks will comprise 12 new learnings spaces, with ICT and wifi technology to enable learning in a digital age.

“Other work as part of the upgrade will include structural improvements to the school’s gymnasium, along with a new roof and upgraded shower facilities and repairs to the library.

“As with all major school upgrades, the Tolaga Bay project will see traditional classrooms replaced with more flexible, open plan learning spaces.

“This is about providing students with an environment that excites and inspires them to learn and achieve more.”

Local MP Anne Tolley visited Tolaga Bay Area School this morning to share news of the upgrade with students and teachers.    Read more »

Not one cent Amy, and Karam is losing the plot, getting close to a lawsuit I suspect

Amy Adams has announced she will commission yet another review into the ongoing claim for compensation by David Bain or is it Joe Karam…hard to work out who is claiming as Bain never says anything.

The Government will launch a fresh inquiry into David Bain’s compensation claim after agreeing to set aside all previous advice on the matter, Justice Minister Amy Adams has announced.

David Bain’s long fight for compensation will start afresh with all previous advice put aside, Government has confirmed.

Justice Minister Amy Adams said this afternoon Cabinet did not have enough information to reach a decision on a potential payout for Mr Bain, who spent 13 years in prison before being found not guilty of murder in a retrial.

Mr Bain was imprisoned in 1995 after being convicted for killing five family members in Dunedin, but was freed after being found not guilty in a second trial in 2009.

Judith Collins has said she would do it all again as well. As well she should, Binnie’s report was dreadfully and hopelessly flawed.

Former Justice Minister Judith Collins says she “stands by everything I said and did” in relation to David Bain’s compensation case after his supporters accused her of derailing the process at a huge cost to the taxpayer.

[…]

Mr Bain’s advocate Joe Karam said the blame for the new delay and its associated costs could be placed squarely on Mrs Collins, who “secretly” asked for a peer review of an initial inquiry by former Canadian Supreme Court judge Ian Binnie.

“It’s a great shame for David, for me, for the New Zealand public in general,” he said. “It’s extremely disappointing that this should happen from a number of points of view, not least of which is the taxpayers who now have to cough up between half a million and a million dollars.”

Mr Karam said he was more confident of a positive outcome from the new review because he believed Ms Adams would be more principled than her predecessor and would not “bulldoze” any findings.

Mrs Collins shot back at Mr Karam yesterday, saying she could never have awarded compensation based on a faulty inquiry.

“I stand by everything I said and did,” she told the Herald. “I did exactly what I had to do.”

Justice Binnie found that Mr Bain was innocent “on the balance of probabilities”, but the peer review by QC Robert Fisher found numerous errors in his findings.

Mrs Collins said the main reason for a delay in the five-year process was the decision by Mr Bain’s side to seek a judicial review of the Government’s handling of the case.

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If she was really taking aim at censorship laws she would abolish them

NBR reports that Amy Adams is taking aim at out-dated censorship laws.

If she was deadly serious she’d move to abolish them altogether.

Archaic classification laws for new media are in the Minister of Broadcasting’s crosshairs.

Following news of the chief censor taking a closer look at the growing video game and online streaming industries, Amy Adams tells NBR ONLINE she has officials from the Ministry of Justice advising her on “possible ways forward to address any issues in this area that may start to arise.”

“It is far from clear how the act applies to online content,” says Ms Adams, who also holds the portfolios of communications, courts and justice.

“Current classification and standards legislation came into effect over 20 years ago so it was inevitable there would come a time when the current regime would need updating.”

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Should David Bain and his mate Joe Karam pay back their legal aid?

Jock Anderson seems to think so:

Following CaseLoad’s controversial and commonsense analysis of the David Cullen Bain Compo Affair last time, numerous callers at the Ladies & Escorts Lounge have raised some interesting questions.

Some ask if Mr Bain or his supporter Joe Karam have repaid any of the $3.33 million in taxpayer-funded legal aid coughed up for Mr Bain’s 2009 “Not Guilty” retrial – the highest amount in New Zealand legal history. (If they have, good on them.)

And whether or not, in the event Mr Bain gets millions of dollars in taxpayer-funded compensation from the Government, should his legal aid be deducted first???

It was earlier reported that of the $3.33 million, $2.33 million went towards the retrial costs and almost $1 million was paid for expenses in the retrial such as research, investigators and forensics.

$426,000 was paid for Mr Karam’s efforts.

Lawyers’ fees throughout the High Court, Court of Appeal and retrial process amounted to $1.77 million of the total bill.

Most of the costs of the retrial were to pay for overseas experts, according to Mr Bain’s lawyer Michael Privet Reed QC.

Mr Bain did not receive legal aid in his compo bid.

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Concrete Cancer Cover-up, Ctd – What’s all the fuss about?

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When you start investigating a story the interesting thing is how people respond to questions.

Some are helpful, provide information and are keen to see an issue resolved. Others are less than helpful and are keen on seeing the story shut down.

Sadly, Rob Gaimster, CEO of the Cement and Concrete Association of New Zealand (CCANZ) falls into the later category.  More on Gaimster later.

A recap is needed on why this Concrete Cancer Story needs to be told.

The basics are this;

  1. In January, February and March 2014, a cement importing company Drymix imported tens of thousands of tonnes of cement from Vietnam into New Zealand which, according to their own test results, failed to meet recognised industry standards.
  2. Drymix failed to make its test results available for public scrutiny which raised questions within New Zealand’s $400 million-a-year cement market.
  3. This cement had higher than accepted alkali content.
  4. Concrete cancer is caused by high alkali levels in cement combined with moisture in the concrete and a reactive form of silica in the aggregate. When this happens it can end up causing expansion and cracking in concrete resulting in major structural problems.   Read more »

Why does Joe Karam mislead so much?

Joe Karam went on Radio NZ yesterday and basically showed what a nasty, vicious little man he is.

Her refers to Amy Adams by title and her full name, same with Simon Power, but in all his comments about Judith Collins he just calls her “Collins” or worse.

In a report released in late 2012, a former Canadian Supreme Court judge, Ian Binnie, concluded that Mr Bain was innocent and suggested he should receive compensation.

However, Ms Collins then sought a review of that report, which criticised the findings as legally flawed.

Mr Bain’s legal team sought a judicial review, arguing that Ms Collins had pre-determined the claim and could not distinguish between her role as Justice Minister and her previous role as Police Minister.

Ms Collins resigned as a minister during the election campaign last year, after an email surfaced suggesting she had been part of efforts to undermine the head of the Serious Fraud Office in 2011. An inquiry later found no evidence to support that.

Mr Bain’s chief supporter Joe Karam told Checkpoint it was now up to Ms Adams to have the claim considered by Cabinet ministers.

“We have no reason to believe that she won’t do a proper just job, as Simon Power did. The only thing that’s gone wrong is the pugnacious minister that we had in between times.”

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