Andrea Vance

Labour’s ties to Ratana are questioned as well they should

Labour treats Maori with condescending and patronising behaviour.

They ‘expect’ support from Maori, in fact probably demand it behind closed doors, but the reality is after 90 years of association with Ratana the elders are finally getting the picture that more results for Maori have been delivered by the National party and their partnership with the Maori party.Labour is being put on notice again but anyone who has been observing politics as long as I have knows this has been going one for quite some time.

Maori it seems are content to talk lots but do little when it comes sorting out politicians.

At Ratana though Andrew Little got his beans, and it was particularly sharp in his mind after the elders changed the protocol for attending the marae, putting all politicians on the same level.

Only one got upset and that was Andrew Little.

Andrea Vance reports:

Ratana church leaders have warned Labour not to take its support for granted, after the party won six of the seven Maori seats at the election.

In a break from tradition, Labour leader Andrew Little and his MPs were obliged to walk onto the marae with politicians from other parties.

Events to mark the 142nd birthday of the prophet Tahupƍtiki Wiremu Rātana ran well over time, because of the attendance of the Maori King TĆ«heitia Paki. But it’s known that church elders have long wanted MPs of all hues to be welcomed together.    Read more »

Who is Andrew Little? Long Form Interviews

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In the interests of providing a complete picture of Andrew Little we are including the long form profiles and interviews with him after he became leader.

Stuff’s Andrea Vance tries to position him as ‘A Reasonable Man’. She even manages to trundle out a tame employer who doesn’t dislike Little for all the dodgy stuff the EMPU have done in the past.

A former airline executive – on the other side of the negotiating table – was impressed.

“There is a really interesting blend of practical compassion within Andrew. That pragmatism realises the commercial realities of a business … It was a very tense and adversarial approach taken by both parties but there was a degree of calmness about him, borne out of recognising as a leader that he has got to let the situation unfold a little bit.

“He says Little “opened his eyes”.

“We understood [then] the impact of the decision that we would have been taking. He was a measured, reasonable voice as opposed to antagonistic. He played a very good, diffusing role.”

Little is “well regarded” by many in the business world, the former airline executive says.

Read more »

The hypocrisy of Andrea Vance

Andrea Vance was at great pains to keep her door swipe card data private, she also refused to cough up texts and phone records between her and a minister.

But now in true typical media and left-wing hypocrisy she is demanding the PM coughs up his texts.

In the vaults of Archives New Zealand lies a unique collection of several thousand fading letters, photographs and papers. The Nash Collection offers a window into a world gone by.

Former prime minister Sir Walter Nash became involved in local politics from his arrival in Wellington in 1909. His personal papers are a treasure trove of information about World War II, the birth of the New Zealand Labour Party, as well as every noteworthy issue of the day.

Without them, a hole would exist in the nation’s historical record.

From the same building, chief archivist Marilyn Little will soon start an investigation into the deletion of Prime Minister John Key’s text messages.

Her inquiry stems from a request by the Green Party. It is a spot of political point-scoring, exploiting Key’s embarrassing friendship with hit-job blogger Cameron Slater. But politicking aside, the investigation is truly important.

In the age of the spin doctor, we now rarely know what a politician really thinks. Their response to a crisis is packaged up into palatable soundbites for news bulletins. Biographies, sympathetically penned by acolytes and admirers, have become another election campaign weapon.   Read more »

Vance gets apology, Fairfax boss happy journo sources and comms protected…hmmm

Andrea Vance has received an apology today from Parliamentary Services.

Big deal, so what…but what is interesting is this comment from Fairfax boss Sinead Boucher:

Fairfax group executive editor Sinead Boucher said she welcomed the apology as a the resolution of privacy complaint Vance made over the incident.

“I am happy that this complaint has been resolved to Andrea’s satisfaction, and in a way that recognises the importance of journalists protecting their communications and the confidentiality of their sources.”

Fairfax didn’t give two hoots about my privacy, nor my sources, nor my communications.  They aided and abetted a criminal hacker and their journalists still go on and on about it. Read more »

Misleading by omission

Don’t you just love our media…clamouring and demanding the PM stop talking to me, demanding that he stop texting me…all the while doing the very same thing they don’t want the PM to do.

Normally I wouldn’t mind but when they mislead by omitting salient details…well what is a man to do?

This morning Andrea Vance has an article where she “quotes” me.

Slater said the claims were “complete rubbish”. And Key fired back during Question Time, saying: “I have not had a proactive relationship with him.”

I did say those words…but they were in the middle of a whole lot of other words, which either she or the editors chose not to publish. And it was in writing so I could see if the reporting was accurate.

But in line with my personal policy that if you lie about me (even by omission) then I’ll reserve the right to tell the truth about you.  Read more »

Inside the beltway and Outside the beltway

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Andrea Vance finished off her little rant yesterday with this statement.

Given the levels of public acrimony towards Slater, the Opposition scent blood and the beginning of Key’s end. It’s all been said before – 2012 was the year of the brain-fade. By the 2017 election, this row, too, will have faded from public memory.

She is right in that no one cares and wrong about this so-called public acrimony.

This is the problem with our journalists…they are stuck either in the beltway or with their head up someone else’s fundament or in the case of several their own fundament.

Outside the beltway there is no public acrimony.    Read more »

Cui bono? Why throw Sam under the bus?

Fairfax’s intrepid reporters Andrea Vance and Deidre Mussen have been briefed by the wet faction, led by John Key, inside National against new corrections minister Sam Lotu-Iiga.

Meanwhile, Beehive sources report the office of Corrections Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga is in “meltdown”, with Police Minister Michael Woodhouse ordered to front any media interviews.

Woodhouse is on his way to Wellington for meetings with officials this afternoon.

“Sam is nowhere to be seen,” the source said.

When you see statements like this the one thing you have to ask is cui bono? Who benefits?

Sources inside parliament are suggesting that the very wet Nikki Kaye and her office are briefing against Lotu-Iiga, as well as Maggie Barry as they are both Auckland based and a threat to Nikki Kaye’s chances of moving up the cabinet ranks.   Read more »

Looks like it’s a please don’t talk about my bike ride with Andrea Vance and our subsequent crash

Reader’s might not know but early yesterday morning Trevor Mallard and Andrea Vance were out cycling when they had a little crash…and altercation with a vehicle. Vance ended up in hospital with a broken shoulder and sources confirm that Mallard was banged up with cuts and bruises.

Not that you will read this in any media, such is the wall of silence that has gone up around the issue of politicians an journalists fraternising.

You will note that other journalists are tweeting in sympathy but for some reason don’t think it is in the public interest to explain the circumstances of the injury.

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There are plenty of other journalists crying tears of sympathy for Andrea, so why no reportage? Why the wall of silence from other media?

In fact it appears that there are smoke screens being quickly erected, here is Trevor Mallard in the Herald this morning defending Judith Collins!   Read more »

Comment of the Day

From the post about ISIS, Olivia Pierson writes:

I’m so glad you put this up Cameron. I have to say I felt a twinge of disgust when I read Andrea Vance’s op-ed; again with the staggeringly militant ignorance of NZ journalism on geopolitical issues which deeply matter!

Firstly – Vance says; “In the last two decades, Iraq has not been far off the military radar.

Military intervention to eliminate weapons of mass destruction was built on a fallacy, years of slaughter failed to remove the threat of terrorism or install democracy.”

The removal of the psychopathic Saddam Hussein Baathist regime was inevitable and appallingly long-overdue, a reality which Tony Blair knew along with President Bush – hence the Anglo-American coalition to overthrow it. The questions around WMD was only ONE of the reasons which put this coalition on the right side of history.

According to the United Nations, there are four egregious acts where breaking even one of them, can and should result in regime change; Saddam broke all four:
1 – committing genocide (against the Kurds),
2 – the invasion of a neighbouring state (Iran & Kuwait),
3 – proliferating nuclear weapons (Saddam himself boasted that Iraq was on its way to acquiring a centrifuge (we now know he only had a blueprint) and remember the 550 metric tons of yellow cake airlifted out of Iraq and shipped straight to Canada in 2008? Should the world have just taken a violent psychopath’s word that the enriched uranium was intended for peaceful purposes only?)
4 – aiding and abetting terrorism (Saddam was a renowned and prolific supporter of terrorism to many Islamist militant organisations, among them Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, head of Al-Qaeda in Iraq, who moved freely between Afghanistan, Syria, Jordan and Iraq – a fact which obviates Saddam’s blessing.) Read more »

Should NZ get involved against ISIS?

There are many commenting now on whether or not NZ should get involved in the fight against ISIS.

Andrea Vance has an opinion piece in the Sunday Star-Times about the issue where she takes the side of the cowards and insists parliament must debate the issue.

This of course plays into the hands of the jihadists and Islamists, who don’t ever have to worry about the niceties of a parliamentary democracy.

In 2001, Helen Clark took a resolution to Parliament to supply SAS troops to the War on Terror which passed 112-7. In fact the offer was made in Washington a month earlier, and Clark insisted the approval of Parliament was not necessary, but she wanted troops to know they “had the full support of MPs.” It was the beginning of the end of New Zealand’s ”independent foreign policy.”

New Zealand faces a tough choice. Stand by impotently as many more hostages are murdered by a network of death? Or join another US-led crusade in a Muslim country?

With one foot in the West and one in the East, and vying for a seat on the UN Security Council, it must be remembered that not all nations choose the US as their global policeman.

In the last two decades, Iraq has not been far off the military radar. Military intervention to eliminate weapons of mass destruction was built on a fallacy, years of slaughter failed to remove the threat of terrorism or install democracy.

The conflict in Afghanistan also saw mission creep. Initial action was targeted at taking out Osama Bin Laden and dismantling Al Qaeda, but became a protracted quest to implement democracy and destroy the Taleban. Key admitted New Zealand paid a ”heavy price” – the death of 10 soldiers.

The latest strikes on Iraq have been condemned worldwide for lacking strategy and tactics. All the warning signs are that taking on ISIS will be a long, bloody war, with complex and unpredictable consequences.

At the very least all this is worthy of a parliamentary debate.

Read more »