Annette King

Manufacturing Clark’s history

Helen Clark does so like to re-visit and re-edit her history, aided and abetted by an unquestioning and ill-informed media.

She has recently given a nice soft cosy interview to Channel Nine in Australia where this claim was made:

Having led the Labour Party without barely a whisper of a coup for six years in opposition and then nine years as Prime Minister, human resources at the UN could hardly argue that credential.

Oh rly?

Is that what she told the hapless Channel Nine reporter? I don’t see where he’d have got it from otherwise… he wouldn’t have the background knowledge of NZ politics.

And then Fairfax repeat it unquestioningly… probably because there isn’t anyone there who’s older than 12.

I’m sure readers don’t really need reminding, but if you do:

Fifteen years ago, Helen Clark stared down a party coup mounted by her eventual successor, Phil Goff. But her victory came at a huge price for Labour. Phil Quin, one of the plotters, offers an insider’s account.

About six weeks before Helen Clark finally cemented her grip on NZ Labour – one which she maintains to this day, even in absentia – I had finally convinced Phil Goff to topple her.

[...]  Read more »

Watkins on the Cunliffe schemozzle

Tracy Watkins has an opinion piece today about “The Enigma of Cunliffe“.

The great enigma about David Cunliffe has always been how someone so smart managed to make so many enemies among his own colleagues.

He is by many accounts a caring boss and doesn’t take himself so seriously that he can’t laugh at himself.

The schemozzle surrounding the Labour leader in recent days probably helps explain the unease of those among his colleagues who opposed his leadership bid.  Cunliffe’s biggest critics have always complained about a lack of self awareness as his potentially fatal flaw.

That is what causes him to swing from a caricature of himself as a gun-slinging troubleshooter to working class hero, who forgets along the way that he also lives in one of Auckland’s swankiest suburbs, Herne Bay.

It may also be what lies at the root of his failure to realise the lack of transparency around donations to his leadership campaign and declaration of financial interests was a grenade waiting to go off.  Read more »

Vernon Small on Labour’s “issues”

Yesterday Vernon Small wrote about the biggest issue facing Labour ahead of this year’s election.

Well the biggest problem after the issue with their tits leader….rejuvenation…or rather the lack of it.

 In politics rejuvenation rates alongside succession planning. Both are easy catchcries and generally seen as “a good thing”.

In reality they are a type of parliamentary Nimby-ism – nice to have if it is someone else who is vacating a seat, and fine as long as you are not the leader whose replacement is being groomed.

On the National side of the aisle rejuvenation is in full swing. At last count 14 MPs have either gone or are going out of a caucus of 59. It is generally accepted as a worthwhile and necessary refreshment of the party. Certainly it is being handled well and without any overt bloodletting. No dummies have been spat in the remaking of the National caucus.

Of course if the polls were different it would be a different story. Shave a theoretical five points off the Government and give it to the Opposition and the narrative might be akin to the “rats leaving a sinking ship” theme that Labour leader David Cunliffe has tried to get up.

But that just looks lame when the last three polls had National harvesting enough support to govern alone.  Read more »

“the most miserable bunch of flowers I’ve ever received” – Annette King

"Miserable" Whaleoil flowers

“Miserable” Whaleoil flowers

Claire Trevett reports

Labour MP Annette King has received flowers from an unlikely admirer and says while she always likes getting flowers “it is the most miserable bunch of flowers I’ve ever received.”

Ms King was sent flowers by Whaleoil blogger Cameron Slater today with a card thanking her for promoting Mr Slater and his blog in Parliament.

Ms King had attacked the blog in Parliament yesterday.

“I’ve always enjoyed receiving flowers, and it was nice to be thanked by Cameron for promoting his blog. But I think his blog must be in financial trouble because it’s the most miserable bunch of flowers I’ve ever received. The flowers will not require me to put them on my Pecuniary Interests register.”

She said there were five gerberas and one lily, with six chocolates attached.

She would not throw them into the gutter because it was not the flowers’ fault they had come from Mr Slater, so she would put them somewhere where others could enjoy them.

Ms King said it did show that Mr Slater at least had a sense of humour.

heh

Let’s play Whaleoil Bingo

Let’s play Whaleoil Bingo…Annette King and Chris Hipkins were playing today.

Annette King went after me in parliament today, too gutless to speak to me in private, the land lady went troppo…even mentioning SOCKs and Silly First Name Syndrome (starts at 6:01)

I wonder what the police interviews with her say? We will find out soon enough.

Read more »

Trotter on Cunliffe, it ain’t flash

Chris Trotter can see that the emperor has no clothes.

This is what he has to say about David Cunliffe’s State of the Nation bomb.

The “Best Start” policy of state-rewarded fecundity is the work of many months of flailing and threshing in Labour’s policy mill. A little grist from years of selfless advocacy by Labour’s Policy Council, and a lot of chaff from the uneasy trio of Annette King, Sue Moroney and Jacinda Ardern.

I listened and sighed. Not because helping the new-born baby’s parents with a weekly payment of $60 is a bad thing to do, but because there was a time when supplying the wherewithal for the labour force’s reproduction was the employers’ responsibility – not the state’s. Will Labour never tire of subsidising the bosses’ parsimony with money taken from the pocket of one worker and slipped into the hand of another?  Read more »

More renewal in National and Labour clings to Clarkists

Eric Roy has announced his retirement and parliament loses a proper hunting and fishing red blooded bloke.

I remember Eric Roy telling an audience how he’d been cured of his cancer by Helen Clark. He’d seen her at the airport and she came up and gave him a hug and a peck on the cheek. At his next oncologist appointment the cancer had gone. He credit Helen Clark for sucking the cancer out of him…by her mere touch.

Two decades after he was first elected to parliament, MP Eric Roy has announced he will not stand for re-election at the end of this year.

First elected in 1993, Roy said he had been humbled and privileged to serve Southland.

He served as an elected member for one term in 1993, before the seat of Awarua was dissolved leading into the 1996 election.

He remained a listed member for National party, where he said he spent two terms serving many electorates in the lower South Island.    Read more »

Predictions results

Ok so here were my predictions from January…how did I go?

1. National Party MPs will cringe every time Hekia Parata is asked a question in the house, and will avoid being in the house when they know Hekia is going to be rinsed.

Went pretty much as predicted…and got progressively worse as the year progressed, saved only by inept Labour questioners who were more distracted by fighting amongst themselves over the leadership.

2. Nanaia Mahuta remains anonymous and never holds Hekia to account.

Yup, neither did anyone else which is bizarre because she is tits and a legend in her own mind.

3. Iain Lees-Galloway’s missus is still dirty with him every time he mentions a certain stenographer.

Not much has changed here.   Read more »

Time for Labour to have a cleanout as well

Under Helen Clark there was almost no renewal…after 9 years of her government pretty much the same faces existed…then there were the 3 years of Phil Goff again with no renewal.

While National cut dead wood and encourages retirements Labour is looking like going into the next election with the same old tired faces.

Labour leader David Cunliffe has been crowing about the growing number of National MPs who have decided to stand down in 2014, likening it to rats deserting a sinking ship. Instead of seeking to make political capital out of his opponent’s obvious drive to bring in new talent at the next election, he would do better to follow suit and start sending the underperformers and time-servers in his own caucus the message that it is time to move on.

Rejuvenation is critical to all political parties. It allows them to bring in new blood to remain fresh in the eyes of voters. However, all too often it is not the parties themselves that do the job, but the electorate, via crushing defeats which see large numbers of sitting MPs turfed out of Parliament.

That is what is so significant about the rejuvenation underway in National. So far, seven of its 59 MPs – nearly an eighth of its caucus – have indicated they will not seek re-election, and there was talk last week that up to six more are considering whether to stand again.   Read more »

The lost press releases of the Labour party

Another bit of satire from the Reader from Runanga:

Labour has introduced a bold commitment to recycling, says David Cunliffe.  Addressing a meeting of the Socialist Champagne Breakfast Club, the Labour leader announced plans to begin recycling policy.

“Labour has lost many of its core supporters to the Greens.  We want to bring those voters back by showing them that recycling is important to Labour too.

“We believe this policy will re-energise the missing million voters as much as plans for gender-balanced lists.”

The plan has already begun, with the existing KiwiBank insurance company KiwiInsure being recycled into KiwiAssure, 1970s power market intervention recycled into NZ Power, and recycling CTU press releases into employment policy.

Mr Cunliffe went on to explain, “Labour recognises the importance of recycling to preserve our scarce resources – in this case, the scarcity of ideas within the Labour party.”   Read more »