Annette King

Cartoon of the Day

effluent-creek

Sugar Tax lobbyists hitting up MPs Thursday

ColaBeer

Election year always gets activist groups all fired up about beating their drum in the hope MPs searching for something to say pick up on their cause.

Blaming sugary drinks for the cause of obesity in NZ is the hot topic at the moment.

With Coca-Cola doing their best to ensure they own the obesity problem with failed interviews like this one with Duncan Garner,  other companies Frucor, Red Bull, The Better Drinks Company are all looking increasing uneasy with where the debate is heading.

Energy drink companies like Frucor’s (makers of V), Red Bull and Monster are already under pressure with bans on the sale of energy drinks to under 18 year olds in some EU countries.  Read more »

Tweet of the Day

Laura McQuillan snaps Paul Goldsmith pashing up the old chook of Rongotai:

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Labour’s broke, got no policy, resorts to smears and Nasty party tactics

So Labour’s broke – no one’s coming to their fundraisers (and there are lots of them) and they want the taxpayer to fund their campaigns.

Therefore they are going after National’s donors which have all be declared according to the law and hurling murk at known donors and ministers in order to scare them off in the future. They did this ti Owen Glenn remember.

I just hope that Labour has declared all of their donors in accordance with the law. It would be an extremely bad look after Trevor Mallard’s allegations yesterday in the house if it turns out that Labour took substantial cash donations and failed to declare them.

I foresee bad things for Labour.

Meanwhile let’s look at some more Labour donation schemes.

There is this from Chris Hipkins:

Helen Clark was the one who attended that fundraiser as the guest speaker.

And Helen Clark caused a diplomatic incident with comments over a Labour party fundraiser.

Former Prime Minister Helen Clark says concerns by the US Embassy over the screening of Michael Moore’s film Fahrenheit 9/11 for a Wellington Central Labour Party fundraising event showed “outright bullying” and “unprofessional” conduct by officials.

And former Defence Force chief Sir Bruce Ferguson says the embassy staff member who linked New Zealand’s humanitarian mission to Iraq to deals for Fonterra in one of his diplomatic cables must have been “smoking dope”.    Read more »

Cunliffe making stuff up on TV3’s Firstline

On Firstline yesterday David Cunliffe gave us all a demonstration in weapons grade making stuff up.

At 3:00 he says that:

“The Prime Minister is responsible for the lowest standards of Ministerial conduct that I can remember in my time in Parliament, bar none”.

What about Labour’s Taito Phillip Field, the only ever MP found guilty of corruption?

When he was in the dock, David Cunliffe, Helen Clark and Michael Cullen all went into bat for him saying that “all Taito is guilty of is working hard for his constituents”.

Cunliffe even defended him multiple times in the house.

Lockwood Smith, at the time, issued this press release:

National Party Immigration spokesman Lockwood Smith says the Labour Government has “stooped to a new low” with its efforts to avoid accountability over the Taito Phillip Field fiasco.

“The Immigration Minister, David Cunliffe, is now refusing to answer legitimate questions about warning notes and telephone calls by Immigration Department staff to the Minister’s office.

“Those messages focused on the fact that Thai overstayers, who were later given visas on special Ministerial direction, were working for Taito Phillip Field while he was advocating on their behalf.    Read more »

The hypocrisy of the left

The left wing, and Russel Norman in particular are extreme hypocrites.

In this article about Maurice Williamson, he says;

“There appears to be a thin line between money and political influence in the National Party.”

Oh really, and no mention of his frequent trips to the Dotcom Mansion.

No mention of Winston Peters and his questions in the house of behalf of Kim Dotcom.

No mention of the cosy deal between the Internet Party and Mana party.

And no mention of his willingness to suspend the rule of law and block a fat fraudster from being extradited.

Not to mention the media has conveniently forgotten the Bill Liu corruption, the Darren Hughes cover up, Annette King getting Cunliffe to “disappear” problems for her husband in the Hawkes Bay, Helen Clark buying her UN job with overseas aid from our pockets, Mike Williams handful of government appointed directorships to subsidise his Presidency of the Labour Party and a hundred other examples of real graft…not to mention Phillip Field who Helen Clark was guilty of only helping his constituents.

Apparently now, according to the left wing, helping constituents is now a resigning offence.

Then there is the performance of David Cunliffe…

when politicians just repeat the same lines over and over again, it just makes me want to discard the audio altogether. grump.

— Jessica Williams (@mizjwilliams) May 1, 2014

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Labour’s dance of death at the Temple of the Tyranny of the Minority

John Armstrong is brutal with his column this morning, describing Labour’s predicament as a ‘danse macabre’ or a dance of death.

Could things get any worse for David Cunliffe than they did this week?

It is quite conceivable they might, of course. Cunliffe’s leadership of Labour still has a way to go before it hits rock-bottom. But this week’s very public exhibition of the disunity which flows freely and abundantly from the deep schisms within the party may well have proved to be sufficiently damaging to have put victory in September’s general election out of reach.

Senior Labour figures are bracing themselves for an expected hit in the opinion polls, but are confident it will be shortlived.

Before this week’s disasters, Labour’s own pollsters were said to have been registering the party’s vote at around 30 per cent. That is very close to the 29.5 per cent recorded in the most recent Herald-DigiPoll survey.

However, usually reliable sources say National’s private polling over the past week points to the real scale of Labour’s horror story with support crumbling to a mindblowing low of just 23 per cent.

The start of the week was punishing enough in itself with Labour squirming in humiliation following National’s cruise missile-like strike which removed the Opposition party’s current prime asset from the forthcoming election campaign.

Labour’s embarrassment at losing Shane Jones as a result of a quite brilliant piece of politics on Murray McCully’s part left Labour powerless to hit back at National.

But that was no excuse for the outbreak of factional warfare in the form of the Labour left indulging in a danse macabre on Jones’ still warm political corpse.

This would not have been in National’s script. The governing party would consequently have been pinching itself at its good fortune in provoking such disarray.

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Manufacturing Clark’s history

Helen Clark does so like to re-visit and re-edit her history, aided and abetted by an unquestioning and ill-informed media.

She has recently given a nice soft cosy interview to Channel Nine in Australia where this claim was made:

Having led the Labour Party without barely a whisper of a coup for six years in opposition and then nine years as Prime Minister, human resources at the UN could hardly argue that credential.

Oh rly?

Is that what she told the hapless Channel Nine reporter? I don’t see where he’d have got it from otherwise… he wouldn’t have the background knowledge of NZ politics.

And then Fairfax repeat it unquestioningly… probably because there isn’t anyone there who’s older than 12.

I’m sure readers don’t really need reminding, but if you do:

Fifteen years ago, Helen Clark stared down a party coup mounted by her eventual successor, Phil Goff. But her victory came at a huge price for Labour. Phil Quin, one of the plotters, offers an insider’s account.

About six weeks before Helen Clark finally cemented her grip on NZ Labour – one which she maintains to this day, even in absentia – I had finally convinced Phil Goff to topple her.

[...]  Read more »

Watkins on the Cunliffe schemozzle

Tracy Watkins has an opinion piece today about “The Enigma of Cunliffe“.

The great enigma about David Cunliffe has always been how someone so smart managed to make so many enemies among his own colleagues.

He is by many accounts a caring boss and doesn’t take himself so seriously that he can’t laugh at himself.

The schemozzle surrounding the Labour leader in recent days probably helps explain the unease of those among his colleagues who opposed his leadership bid.  Cunliffe’s biggest critics have always complained about a lack of self awareness as his potentially fatal flaw.

That is what causes him to swing from a caricature of himself as a gun-slinging troubleshooter to working class hero, who forgets along the way that he also lives in one of Auckland’s swankiest suburbs, Herne Bay.

It may also be what lies at the root of his failure to realise the lack of transparency around donations to his leadership campaign and declaration of financial interests was a grenade waiting to go off.  Read more »

Vernon Small on Labour’s “issues”

Yesterday Vernon Small wrote about the biggest issue facing Labour ahead of this year’s election.

Well the biggest problem after the issue with their tits leader….rejuvenation…or rather the lack of it.

 In politics rejuvenation rates alongside succession planning. Both are easy catchcries and generally seen as “a good thing”.

In reality they are a type of parliamentary Nimby-ism – nice to have if it is someone else who is vacating a seat, and fine as long as you are not the leader whose replacement is being groomed.

On the National side of the aisle rejuvenation is in full swing. At last count 14 MPs have either gone or are going out of a caucus of 59. It is generally accepted as a worthwhile and necessary refreshment of the party. Certainly it is being handled well and without any overt bloodletting. No dummies have been spat in the remaking of the National caucus.

Of course if the polls were different it would be a different story. Shave a theoretical five points off the Government and give it to the Opposition and the narrative might be akin to the “rats leaving a sinking ship” theme that Labour leader David Cunliffe has tried to get up.

But that just looks lame when the last three polls had National harvesting enough support to govern alone.  Read more »