Argentina

The Argies are going to be really upset over this, statue of Maggie erected in Falklands

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A statue of Margaret Thatcher has been erected in the Falkland Islands, a move sure to upset the Argies.

A statue honouring Margaret Thatcher has been unveiled in the Falkland Islands for the first time.

The tribute to the former Prime Minister – who lead Britain to victory in the 1982 conflict to defend the islands – was revealed in the island’s capital Stanley on Saturday.

After Baroness Thatcher died in 2013 the population of the Falkland Islands were consulted about how they wished to commemorate the leader.

The overwhelming response was for a statue which was unveiled at a ceremony on what is Margaret Thatcher Day on the island by her son Sir Mark Thatcher.
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Bitter Aussies moaning about our FTA with China

Australia is in the grip of a debilitating wind down of their economy after the mining boom popped. I’ve always said that Australia had a two track economy, one in the bush based around minerals and mining and the cities. The two are not as inter-related as many suspected.

The cities have been struggling for some time, while the bush boomed. Then it all came crashing down and the minerals sector caught up with the rest of Australia.

Things are not good for their economy.

Our economy is growing, but the Aussie commentators still attempt to bring us down to their level.

Uppity Kiwis feeling boastful about their dollar approaching parity with the mighty Aussie might do well to stick to rugby for their kicks. Their China-driven boom is coming to an end as quickly as Australia’s. And they have less to fall back on when it does.

Meanwhile, reports of Gina Rinehart going long on dairy farms could prove as reliable a warning as many another billionaire diversifying outside his or her area of expertise.

The New Zealand economy’s resurgence has owed much to China’s demand for milk products and getting in early for a comprehensive free trade agreement with the Middle Kingdom.

Trouble is, China has been busily investing and encouraging others to invest in increased and globally diversified milking. Just as iron ore miners have ramped up production both from existing provinces and new projects from Africa to Mongolia, New Zealand’s farmers are facing increased competition from South America to Russia and all points in between, including Australia.

People have got to eat.

This time last year I was in Uruguay, a country that, in several ways, is the New Zealand of South America. It’s small, agricultural, relatively peaceful (the lowest murder rate of the continent), has a similar population of 3 million or so and a large diaspora, manages to perform disproportionately well in its chosen football code, is socially advanced on several levels (gay marriage, legalised marijuana) and has ridden cows to posterity, courtesy of Chinese demand.

Chinese investment in Uruguay is obvious and remarked on by the locals: Chinese cars on the roads, new buildings sporting Chinese brands. And Uruguay is just one small corner of the global market China has been developing as a source of commodities and consumers. It’s been doing that developing both as a matter of Beijing policy and individual entrepreneur’s search for opportunities.

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Argentine court declares that ape has human rights

You would have to assume that by the mere title of human rights including the word human, that apes were automatically disqualified.

Not so if you are an Argentine judge:

In an unprecedented decision, an Argentine court has ruled that the Sumatran orangutan ‘Sandra’, who has spent 20 years at the zoo in Argentina’s capital Buenos Aires, should be recognized as a person with a right to freedom.

The ruling, signed by the judges unanimously, would see Sandra freed from captivity and transferred to a nature sanctuary in Brazil after a court recognized the primate as a “non-human person” which has some basic human rights. The Buenos Aires zoo has 10 working days to seek an appeal.

The “habeas corpus” ruling in favor of the orangutan was requested last November by the Association of Professional Lawyers for Animal Rights (AFADA) alleging that Sandra suffered “unjustified confinement of an animal with proven cognitive ability.”

Lawyers argued that just as a person, the ape is capable of maintaining emotional ties and has the ability to reason, while feeling frustrated with her confinement. Furthermore, the legal team claimed that the 29-year old orangutan can make decisions, has self-awareness and perception of time. And therefore, all things considered, Sandra’s presence at the Zoo constituted illegal deprivation of liberty.

Not to speak poorly of Sandra, but the same can be said about most dogs and cats. ¬† Read more »

Dodgy socialist Argies using drones to catch out rich tax dodgers

The Argie government is using drones to catch out dodgy rich pricks who are rorting taxpayers on their tax returns.

The Argentine government has used drones to catch out wealthy tax evaders who had not declared mansions and swimming pools.

Unmanned aircraft were dispatched over an upper class area of Buenos Aires and discovered 200 homes and 100 pools that had not been detailed on returns.

Tax officials said the drones took pictures of luxury houses standing on lots registered as empty.

The evasions found by the drones amounted to missing tax payments of more than $2 million and owners of the properties have been warned they now face large fines. ¬†¬† Read more »

All Blacks v Argentina

Two different authors today!
by Salacious Crumb
This week’s test promises to raise more questions about the current state of both sides than any answers their previous two matches may have provided.
Argentina will be buoyed, but greatly disappointed by the narrow defeats to a strong South African side while the All Blacks have yet again been forced to make changes to key positions.
Undoubtedly it will be the forwards contest that will be the most fascinating with the visitors boasting a typically impressive pack in terms of size and power.
Argentina, through injury of their own, have been forced to make changes to their loose forward trio with the outstanding Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe forced to switch to the blindside to accommodate the incoming No.8, Leonardo Senatore replacing Pablo Matera.
Whether this give Los Pumas the loose forward balance to attack the All Black halves is questionable but Lobbe in particular has the potential to threaten, through his physicality at the breakdown and ball in hand.
The biggest question mark of all will be on the performance of Beauden Barrett who starts in the number 10 jersey for the first time.
An instinctive, skilled player with outstanding acceleration, he may find the time and space required to show his wares somewhat diminished if his forwards fail to deliver a solid platform to work off.
If given the opportunity to display his game however, the visitors may see a lot of the number 10 on a black jersey.

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Lose Wars, Can’t Care for a Polar Bear

Forget about people, you can tell much more about a culture and a country by how it cares for animals.  Some zoos around the world I have visited have been downright disgusting.  The lowlight of my decade of touring around the world has been the Thonburi Snake Farm in Bangkok.

But I have never been to Argentina.

Maybe if the polar bear played football Argentinians might care about him a bit more.

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This is Arturo, a polar bear living in South America who has been called the ‚Äėworld‚Äôs saddest animal‚Äô.

He sits in a concrete enclosure at Mendoza Zoo in Argentina in temperatures of up to 40C (104F) and is said to have been depressed since his long-term friend Pelusa died two years ago.

It is claimed the 29-year-old’s lonely life is causing him to display abnormal behaviour, including tilting his head and showing his teeth while pacing back and forth and rocking from side to side.

Animal rights activists now want Arturo – whose only access to cooling water in his enclosure is said to be a pool just 20in (50cm) deep – moved to another zoo that offers cooler conditions.

 

 

Today’s World Cup Final chat

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Rather than have this part of the General Debate today, please put your world cup comments here.  Many thanks.

Tomorrow’s World Cup Final chat

At 6:45 am a post for your “live” and post-match World Cup comments will go live. ¬†It’s only a 50/50 chance, but for bragging rights, you may want to post your prediction here.

Now, if you add the score, that would be a lot braver.

Mine:  Germany, 1 Р0, no extra time needed.

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So, did the World Cup catch you in the end?   Have games like the Dutch and German high scoring games converted you from the view the game is too boring?  Has this been the best WC in modern times?

Face of the day

Her real face

Her real face

Above is an actual non photo-shopped photo of a woman called Esther Honig.

She decided to do an experiment using Photo shop in order to

examine how the standards of unobtainable beauty vary across cultures on a global level.

-au.eonline.com

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder so she altered her face in a series of photos to reflect the beauty ideals of the following eight countries.

Can you match the photo to the country? ( Answers below )

Which photo do you think is the most beautiful?

My favourite was photo D. When I showed Cam and both my children they also chose D.

Philippines, Argentina, Bulgaria, Morocco, Pakistan, United States,United Kingdom, Bulgaria

 

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Dreaming Argie ratbags

The Argie footballers have decided to insult the Poms over the Falkland Islands ahead of the Football World Cup.

I reckon the Poms should unfurl a massive banner of the Sun frontpage in retribution.

Argentina’s footballers inflamed their country’s rivalry with England on the eve of the World Cup on Saturday, unfurling a banner claiming sovereignty of the Falkland Islands before defeating Slovenia 2-0.

Goals from Ricardo Alvarez and skipper Lionel Messi ensured a winning send-off for the home side at La Plata, north of Buenos Aires, before they head to Brazil.

But the Argentinian squad will have raised eyebrows in Britain showing off their politically-charged banner declaring “Las Malvinas Son Argentinas (The Malvinas are Argentine)” to the 52,000 crowd before kick off.

The banner is regularly put on show before Argentina’s games. But the proximity to the World Cup brought new attention.

The South Atlantic islands have been ruled by Britain since 1833 but Argentina claims them and in 1982 attempted to seize control, sparking a brief but intense war.¬† Read more »