Argentina

Argies need to get over the fact they lost

The Argies are still sooking it up over the fact they lost war and they get mocked for it.

And they would lose again any time they tried to re-take the Falklands. They are whinging about Clarkson still.

Jeremy Clarkson and his Top Gear colleagues deliberately entered Argentina with a Falklands-referenced number plate, a judge has ruled.

Maria Cristina Barrionuevo rejected claims by the BBC and the presenter that the use of the plate H982 FKL on Clarkson’s Porsche was an “unfortunate coincidence”.

She also described the decision to drive through southern Argentina with the vehicle – abandoned after angry locals forced the Top Gear team to halt filming and flee the country – “arrogant and disrespectful”.    Read more »

Next they will be looking for some wind to piss into

The Argies are all upset they’ve been spied on.

I’m surprised they even had a moan, they are still effectively at war over the Falkland Islands, which Argentina still think  are theirs, even after their Army displayed a French like capacity for marching backwards while their Navy ended up on the bottom of the Atlantic.

The Argentine foreign ministry has summoned the British ambassador in Buenos Aires to complain about reports that Britain spied on Argentina amid renewed fears of a Falkland Islands invasion.<

John Freeman, the ambassador, was called in by Eduardo Zuain, the deputy foreign minister, at a time of heightened tensions between the two countries.

Argentina said that it summoned Mr Freeman “to demand explanations over the silence of the British government” over the espionage claims.

He also delivered a threat to prosecute oil companies working in waters off the Falklands and re-iterated Argentine complaints about British plans to boost defences on the islands.

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Latest Snowden revelations a big so bloody what

The traitor Edward Snowden has made more revelations…this time that the United Kingdom spied on Argentina.

Astonishing I know…spying on enemies that you went to war with.

Documents released by the American whistle-blower Edward Snowden claim that Britain spied for several years on the Argentine government.

According to reports in the Argentine media, Britain was concerned that Argentina could launch another attempt to reclaim the Falkland Islands.

The two nations fought a war over the islands in 1982.

Last month the British government announced it was upgrading its military presence on the islands.

Mr Snowden says British agents were actively spying on Argentina between 2006 and 2011.   Read more »

She’ll be wanting the Falklands back again to distract from this little problem

Argie President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner has been charged with covering up an Iranian bombing of a Jewish centre.

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner has been formally accused of shielding Iranian officials from prosecution over allegations of their involvement in a 1994 bombing at a Buenos Aires Jewish centre, prosecutors said.

The prosecution move advances the case against Kirchner that was being pursued by late prosecutor Alberto Nisman before he died mysteriously on the eve of congressional hearings on his accusations.

Prosecutor Gerardo Pollicita was assigned the case that prosecutor Nisman was building before he was found dead on January 18 after being shot in the head. His death was initially labelled a suicide, but suspicion has fallen on Kirchner’s government.

In a 289-page report to a judge, Nisman had accused Kirchner, Foreign Minister Hector Timerman and others in her administration of allegedly brokering the cover up in exchange for oil from Iran.

Kirchner has strongly denied the accusations, and Iran has repeatedly said it was not involved in the bombing, which killed 85 people and wounded 200.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Picture from the USHMM Photo Archives, courtesy of the Israel Government Press Office. Defendant Adolf Eichmann takes notes during his trial in Jerusalem. The glass booth in which Eichmann sat was erected to protect him from assassination. (May 29, 1961).

Picture from the USHMM Photo Archives, courtesy of the Israel Government Press Office. Defendant Adolf Eichmann takes notes during his trial in Jerusalem. The glass booth in which Eichmann sat was erected to protect him from assassination. (May 29, 1961).

Eichmann Trial

The Trial That Taught the World About the Horrors of the Holocaust

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The Argies are going to be really upset over this, statue of Maggie erected in Falklands

Margaret-Thatcher-Falklands-240971

A statue of Margaret Thatcher has been erected in the Falkland Islands, a move sure to upset the Argies.

A statue honouring Margaret Thatcher has been unveiled in the Falkland Islands for the first time.

The tribute to the former Prime Minister – who lead Britain to victory in the 1982 conflict to defend the islands – was revealed in the island’s capital Stanley on Saturday.

After Baroness Thatcher died in 2013 the population of the Falkland Islands were consulted about how they wished to commemorate the leader.

The overwhelming response was for a statue which was unveiled at a ceremony on what is Margaret Thatcher Day on the island by her son Sir Mark Thatcher.
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Bitter Aussies moaning about our FTA with China

Australia is in the grip of a debilitating wind down of their economy after the mining boom popped. I’ve always said that Australia had a two track economy, one in the bush based around minerals and mining and the cities. The two are not as inter-related as many suspected.

The cities have been struggling for some time, while the bush boomed. Then it all came crashing down and the minerals sector caught up with the rest of Australia.

Things are not good for their economy.

Our economy is growing, but the Aussie commentators still attempt to bring us down to their level.

Uppity Kiwis feeling boastful about their dollar approaching parity with the mighty Aussie might do well to stick to rugby for their kicks. Their China-driven boom is coming to an end as quickly as Australia’s. And they have less to fall back on when it does.

Meanwhile, reports of Gina Rinehart going long on dairy farms could prove as reliable a warning as many another billionaire diversifying outside his or her area of expertise.

The New Zealand economy’s resurgence has owed much to China’s demand for milk products and getting in early for a comprehensive free trade agreement with the Middle Kingdom.

Trouble is, China has been busily investing and encouraging others to invest in increased and globally diversified milking. Just as iron ore miners have ramped up production both from existing provinces and new projects from Africa to Mongolia, New Zealand’s farmers are facing increased competition from South America to Russia and all points in between, including Australia.

People have got to eat.

This time last year I was in Uruguay, a country that, in several ways, is the New Zealand of South America. It’s small, agricultural, relatively peaceful (the lowest murder rate of the continent), has a similar population of 3 million or so and a large diaspora, manages to perform disproportionately well in its chosen football code, is socially advanced on several levels (gay marriage, legalised marijuana) and has ridden cows to posterity, courtesy of Chinese demand.

Chinese investment in Uruguay is obvious and remarked on by the locals: Chinese cars on the roads, new buildings sporting Chinese brands. And Uruguay is just one small corner of the global market China has been developing as a source of commodities and consumers. It’s been doing that developing both as a matter of Beijing policy and individual entrepreneur’s search for opportunities.

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Argentine court declares that ape has human rights

You would have to assume that by the mere title of human rights including the word human, that apes were automatically disqualified.

Not so if you are an Argentine judge:

In an unprecedented decision, an Argentine court has ruled that the Sumatran orangutan ‘Sandra’, who has spent 20 years at the zoo in Argentina’s capital Buenos Aires, should be recognized as a person with a right to freedom.

The ruling, signed by the judges unanimously, would see Sandra freed from captivity and transferred to a nature sanctuary in Brazil after a court recognized the primate as a “non-human person” which has some basic human rights. The Buenos Aires zoo has 10 working days to seek an appeal.

The “habeas corpus” ruling in favor of the orangutan was requested last November by the Association of Professional Lawyers for Animal Rights (AFADA) alleging that Sandra suffered “unjustified confinement of an animal with proven cognitive ability.”

Lawyers argued that just as a person, the ape is capable of maintaining emotional ties and has the ability to reason, while feeling frustrated with her confinement. Furthermore, the legal team claimed that the 29-year old orangutan can make decisions, has self-awareness and perception of time. And therefore, all things considered, Sandra’s presence at the Zoo constituted illegal deprivation of liberty.

Not to speak poorly of Sandra, but the same can be said about most dogs and cats.   Read more »

Dodgy socialist Argies using drones to catch out rich tax dodgers

The Argie government is using drones to catch out dodgy rich pricks who are rorting taxpayers on their tax returns.

The Argentine government has used drones to catch out wealthy tax evaders who had not declared mansions and swimming pools.

Unmanned aircraft were dispatched over an upper class area of Buenos Aires and discovered 200 homes and 100 pools that had not been detailed on returns.

Tax officials said the drones took pictures of luxury houses standing on lots registered as empty.

The evasions found by the drones amounted to missing tax payments of more than $2 million and owners of the properties have been warned they now face large fines.    Read more »

All Blacks v Argentina

Two different authors today!
by Salacious Crumb
This week’s test promises to raise more questions about the current state of both sides than any answers their previous two matches may have provided.
Argentina will be buoyed, but greatly disappointed by the narrow defeats to a strong South African side while the All Blacks have yet again been forced to make changes to key positions.
Undoubtedly it will be the forwards contest that will be the most fascinating with the visitors boasting a typically impressive pack in terms of size and power.
Argentina, through injury of their own, have been forced to make changes to their loose forward trio with the outstanding Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe forced to switch to the blindside to accommodate the incoming No.8, Leonardo Senatore replacing Pablo Matera.
Whether this give Los Pumas the loose forward balance to attack the All Black halves is questionable but Lobbe in particular has the potential to threaten, through his physicality at the breakdown and ball in hand.
The biggest question mark of all will be on the performance of Beauden Barrett who starts in the number 10 jersey for the first time.
An instinctive, skilled player with outstanding acceleration, he may find the time and space required to show his wares somewhat diminished if his forwards fail to deliver a solid platform to work off.
If given the opportunity to display his game however, the visitors may see a lot of the number 10 on a black jersey.

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