Army

Photo Of The Day

Robert Lee Johnson.

Robert Lee Johnson.

A Most Valuable Spy

This is the story of Robert Lee Johnson, a sergeant in the United States Army stationed in Berlin. Johnson has such a hatred of the army that he risked everything to hurt the country he was tasked to serve. He finally got his wish of revenge and it came during the cold war, as an association with the Russian KGB turned a run of the mill NCO into one of the most infamous spies in history.

The meeting had not gone well, the man gloomily reflected as he was driven out of East Berlin. His head was still heavy after a few too many snifters of cognac. The American’s ambitious scheme to build a life and career in Moscow had sputtered to an unforeseen halt; the only concession the Russians had made was to invite him back for another meeting in two weeks’ time. The three KGB representatives he had talked to didn’t seem very enthusiastic about his offer to defect from the US Army.

The date was 22 February 1953. It was George Washington’s Birthday, a holiday for all American troops stationed in Berlin. The drunken man being shuttled out of East Berlin in a Soviet car was Robert Lee Johnson, a 31-year-old sergeant in the United States Army. Most competent intelligence services would have considered the Army clerk useless, dismissing him as an embittered bureaucrat with a grossly inflated sense of self-worth. Nine years later he would, through a combination of luck and circumstance, become one of the most destructive spies the KGB had ever implanted into the US military.

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Faces of the day

Today’s faces of the day are the nine teachers who were killed trying to protect their students in Peshawar. ( Photos taken from Daily Mail.co.uk )

Beenish Pervaiz

Tahira Kazi

Saeed Khan

Afsha Ahmed

Hifsa Khush and four other brave teachers whose names are unknown at this time.

I honour them for their bravery.

I will let their students’ words below, be their memorial.

 

Beenish Pervaiz (pictured back left with her family), a former student at the University of Greenwich, was reportedly one of the teachers who was slaughtered by gunmen as she tried to help her young pupils

Gunned down and blown up: A photograph reportedly showing five of the teachers (circled) who died in the Pakistan massacre when Taliban gunmen and suicide bombers killed 148 children and staff at the school

Gunned down and blown up: A photograph reportedly showing five of the teachers (circled) who died in the Pakistan massacre when Taliban gunmen and suicide bombers killed 148 children and staff at the school

Tahira Kazi, the principal of the Army Public School and College in Peshawar, died after she was reportedly set on fire by Taliban militants in front of her pupils. She is pictured with a man believed to be her son

Tahira Kazi, the principal of the Army Public School and College in Peshawar, died after she was reportedly set on fire by Taliban militants in front of her pupils. She is pictured with a man believed to be her son

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Photo Of The Day

Photograph: Öesterreichische Nationalbibliothek. This photograph is from the collection of the Imperial and Royal War Press Bureau.  'Unloading of a horse in Tschanak Kale (Turkey)'

Photograph: Öesterreichische Nationalbibliothek. This photograph is from the collection of the Imperial and Royal War Press Bureau.
‘Unloading of a horse in Tschanak Kale (Turkey)’

Millions of animals were relied upon by all sides in World War One

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The Special Ops wish list, laser rifles, pain rays and other cool stuff

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Who wouldn’t want a laser rifle, or a “pain ray”…these are just some of the wish list for US special operations forces.

Laser rifles. Canine air conditioners. There are lots of gadgets that U.S. commandos would love to have, except for the fact that these items don’t even exist.

That’s why the U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC), which includes the Army’s Special Forces and Rangers, has published a long list of equipment that it wants private industry to develop and build.

What is fascinating about this list isn’t just that it tells us what capabilities U.S. special operations forces want. It also tells us what capabilities they don’t have.

But just as important, it’s a forecast of the kind of warfare that American commandos anticipate they will be fighting. Special operations forces, along with drones, have now become America’s preferred method of waging war. If commandos get a new weapon or sensor, it probably will be used on a real mission or battlefield. And when the special operators get new technology, then it sometimes trickles down to the rest of the military, and from there to the civilian world.  Read more »

Lets not go to war with the Lithuanian’s

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A message to my military readers

reposted:

endeavouranzacs

I have had a few emails from regular readers, subscribers and commenters who are in the military.

They all relate to their ability to get either via RSS or email (which is powered by RSS) the full text of each post.

For those on deployment, especially on ships or in Afghanistan and other regions, I’m told they have email access but little or no ability to browse.

I have now found a solution for you all.

If you are in our armed forces, or operate from a remote location where email or RSS the only way to enjoy Whale Oil Beef Hooked then please email me with your details so I can add you to the subscriber list. You can then commence to receive all my pearls of wisdom direct in your inbox, or the full RSS feed.

At this stage this facility is only available for those in the services. A short explanation of your current service/rank will suffice. Special exceptions will be made for those outside the services, but the explanation really does need to be exceptional.

wn07013704

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Whale Week What Was

QC7kkThe blog started Saturday by having a look at a number of Christchurch people taking pictures up women’s skirts at malls.  And wouldn’t you know it?  A teacher was arrested as well.  Iain Lees-Galloway shows he is a slimy git by opening a Burger King and then refusing to take a bite, preferring to preach sensible food choices.  Cam then called for nominations for Worst Political Journalist, and Barry Soper and John Campbell appeared hot favourites.   Next we had a vote on Best Political Journalist, which Larry Williams took out with a massive 47% of the vote.  Graham McCready withdrew litigation against John Banks because it made no sense to anyone – as in – they couldn’t understand what it said.  Whale then claims a win on his Hekia Parata predictions and wonders why Key has let this train wreck happen.  We raise our eyebrows about Nelson looking for a scooter riding bottom pincher and then watch a video of what happens to a pig at the bottom of the sea over 7 days.  Next a post where Greens are fighting Greens over the Google solar plant.  On the one side: solar energy.  On the other? Turtles.   Charles Krauthammer explains why gun control alone isn’t the solution to mass shootings.   A MENSA spokesperson calls people with low IQs carrots and the BBC feels they have to apologise.  There is a property for sale next to Kim Dotcom‘s place.  Cam suggests the GCSB or the US should have bought it to set up spying operations.   WOBH is calling for The Whale Army to send in their holiday snaps, in a new feature called Snapped!  Cam takes a brief look at who will enter parliament if Tim Groser leaves for the WTO.  To close the day, a WhaleTech post looks at a the cull-de-sac that’s the QII roll-up keyboard. Read more »

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Face of the Day

Stuff.co.nz

Willie Apiata had left the Army to invest his considerable skills with at-risk youth:

New Zealand’s only living recipient of the Victoria Cross, Corporal Willie Apiata, is leaving the military.

Prime Minister John Key has revealed Apiata is leaving the SAS to work for the youth charity High Wire Trust.

The Trust, which has an outdoor pursuits centre in Papakura, helps at-risk young people.

“I’m sure he’ll do a great job out there,” Key said.

“He’ll be a great role model for them.”

Apiata had advised the Defence Force several months ago that he intended to leave the regular force but he would remain a member of the reserves.

A Non-Lethal Suggestion for the Army

SunLive

The Army is holding come cockamamie conference about non-lethal weapons.

The SunLive editorial makes a couple of suggestions they could use:

We recommend they talk to David Shearer’s speech writer, who has the ability to bore people on a wide scale ranging from ‘mild discomfort’ to ‘near death’ with just a microphone. There are unconfirmed reports from our contacts in Hollywood that Shearer has ousted Mel Gibson in the latest in the movie series, “Non-Lethal Weapon 6: The politically correct movie.” We’ve voted Jacinda into the partner role, if only because she looks good on the cover. Watch for the special cameo appearance by Nick Smith, doing all his own stunts, when he shoots himself in the foot.

How to save Defence Dollars

Xinhuanet

Stop wasting money on crap like this:

The Army will be promoting understanding of non-lethal weapons and technology in the Asia-Pacific region when it hosts a major international seminar later this month.

About 75 participants from 19 countries will attend the 2012 Non-Lethal Weapons Executive Seminar (NOLES) in Wellington on March 28-30, said a statement from the New Zealand Defence Force ( NZDF).

Non-lethal, also known as “less lethal” systems, were weapons and devices designed to incapacitate a target while minimizing fatalities or permanent injury, it said.

NZDF Land Component Commander Brigadier Mark Wheeler said in the statement that NOLES was an annual multilateral seminar sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Pacific.

Keynote speakers this year would discuss international human rights law, the laws of armed conflict, and planning considerations for the employment of less lethal weapons.

“It is becoming more commonplace for military forces to be operating in conflict zones where they are required to maintain law and order, control civil disturbances, or respond to rapid changes in levels of violence, where the use of lethal force may not be justified or permissible,” said Wheeler.

“Less lethal weapons provide military commanders with more options. They can be used to disperse large groups of hostile people, stop or disable vehicles, or deny access to important facilities.”

The use of less lethal technologies enabled security forces to counter non-traditional threats, while mitigating the effects on civilians and the environment, said Wheeler.