Asylum

Not plain sailing for Rudd

This is a great sledge against Kevin Rudd’s boat people policy. It just goes to show the power of people banding together. Funded by their own means, with a budget of $600, and now it is splashed all across the media in Australia.

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A GROUP of middle-class Aussie taxpayers have funded their own political campaign posters designed to point out the “hypocrisy” of Kevin Rudd’s asylum seeker policy.

In response to the Federal Government’s multi-million dollar anti-asylum seeker ad campaign a group of twenty-somethings have created a parody of the ad, “designed to tell a different story and point out the hypocrisy and mean spirited asylum seeker policy”, according to one of the group’s members, freelance digital strategist, Jessica Miller.   Read more »

Euphemism for the day: Irregular maritime arrivals

In the case of Australia, concerns over ‘unauthorised’ boat arrivals or ‘boat people’ (also referred to as ‘irregular maritime arrivals’) have occupied successive governments since the 1970s. However, many argue that the number of boat arrivals in Australia is very small in comparison to the significant flows of ‘unauthorised’ arrivals in other parts of the world over the last few decades.    —aph.gov.au

Well, sure.  Compared to the Iraqis fleeing their country before Desert Storm, or compared to the mess that’s Dafrur, I guess that would be true.

But that’s really just hiding the true problem among bigger numbers.

Australia publish  a quarterly report on their immigration problems.  In the latest one, IMAs (Irregular Maritime Arrivals, remember?) , presents some scary looking numbers:   Read more »

Poll: Thanks John, what else are you going to give away?

(There is a poll at the end of this post)

New Zealand are to accept some of Australia’s “Boat People”.

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First a definition

The term ‘boat people’ entered the Australian vernacular in the 1970s with the arrival of the first wave of boats carrying people seeking asylum from the aftermath of the Vietnam War. Over half the Vietnamese population was displaced in these years and, while most fled to neighbouring Asian countries, some embarked on the voyage by boat to Australia.   Read more »