Asylum

Truth is stranger than fiction; migrants sue Germany

We live in a strange world where migrants can sue the country that housed them, fed them, clothed them and educated their children by using that country’s money and legal system to do it.

Despite facing overwhelming numbers Germany has been attempting to do a halfway decent job processing the millions of migrants who are claiming asylum. To add insult to injury, after being a huge drain on Germany’s resources, six thousand of them are now adding legal costs to the bill. Germany’s Achilles heel is its liberalism. Because of its lack of conservatism and patriotism  it is an easy target. Free things attract people who want free stuff not  people who want to work for a living and contribute to your society. Socialists and liberals always rely on conservatives and capitalists to create the wealth so that they can redistribute it.  The way Germany is going it soon will have no more wealth left to give.

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Photo Of The Day

Source Unknown. Shell shock sufferers in Bedlam.

Source Unknown.
Shell shock sufferers in Bedlam.

Bedlam

History’s Most Notorious Asylum

If the road to hell is paved with good intentions, that path may well cut through the fetid halls of Bethlem Hospital. The institution began as a priory for the New Order of St. Mary of Bethlehem in 1247. The monks there began to look after the indigent and mentally ill. The monks believed that harsh treatment, a basic diet, and isolation from society starved the disturbed portion of the psyche.

While their aim was pure, those who would succeed the monks were not so wholesome of purpose. What would follow was more than 500 years of madness and squalor. So awful was Bethlem that its nickname “Bedlam” would come to be a universal synonym for lunacy.

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Not plain sailing for Rudd

This is a great sledge against Kevin Rudd’s boat people policy. It just goes to show the power of people banding together. Funded by their own means, with a budget of $600, and now it is splashed all across the media in Australia.

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A GROUP of middle-class Aussie taxpayers have funded their own political campaign posters designed to point out the “hypocrisy” of Kevin Rudd’s asylum seeker policy.

In response to the Federal Government’s multi-million dollar anti-asylum seeker ad campaign a group of twenty-somethings have created a parody of the ad, “designed to tell a different story and point out the hypocrisy and mean spirited asylum seeker policy”, according to one of the group’s members, freelance digital strategist, Jessica Miller.   Read more »

Euphemism for the day: Irregular maritime arrivals

In the case of Australia, concerns over ‘unauthorised’ boat arrivals or ‘boat people’ (also referred to as ‘irregular maritime arrivals’) have occupied successive governments since the 1970s. However, many argue that the number of boat arrivals in Australia is very small in comparison to the significant flows of ‘unauthorised’ arrivals in other parts of the world over the last few decades.    —aph.gov.au

Well, sure.  Compared to the Iraqis fleeing their country before Desert Storm, or compared to the mess that’s Dafrur, I guess that would be true.

But that’s really just hiding the true problem among bigger numbers.

Australia publish  a quarterly report on their immigration problems.  In the latest one, IMAs (Irregular Maritime Arrivals, remember?) , presents some scary looking numbers:   Read more »

Poll: Thanks John, what else are you going to give away?

(There is a poll at the end of this post)

New Zealand are to accept some of Australia’s “Boat People”.

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First a definition

The term ‘boat people’ entered the Australian vernacular in the 1970s with the arrival of the first wave of boats carrying people seeking asylum from the aftermath of the Vietnam War. Over half the Vietnamese population was displaced in these years and, while most fled to neighbouring Asian countries, some embarked on the voyage by boat to Australia.   Read more »

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