Australia

An evening with Julia Gillard

I went to listen to Julia Gillard last night with Mum. It was enjoyable. Mum like me is a conservative but she appreciates women in positions of power and what we can learn from them. I didn’t agree with Julia’s position on ‘Affirmative action’ to get women into politics. Affirmative action whether applied to race or sex is reverse discrimination in my opinion and my Mum agrees.

My Mother heads a very large business and she built it from the ground up. She earned the respect she now commands and nothing was handed to her on a platter. We both find the idea of ‘ giving ‘ women a quota disrespectful to women’s abilities. As far as I know Julia Gillard got to the top job on merit yet she doesn’t expect other women to achieve what she achieved in the same way.To be fair I think her real problem was the number of women currently in Politics. She reasoned that if only a few are in it then that reduces the chances of a leader being a woman. Sure it does but it also ensures that when women like her and Helen Clark do make the top job,they will be more than equipped to handle it. As she said last night, Politics is an adversarial environment. Julia made it very clear that she did not think as some women do, that more women in Politics would make the environment more consensual. She believes that you should fight passionately for what you believe in and she makes no apology for doing that.

That aside, Julia had plenty of pertinent things to share with the audience and some of it was very relevant to why I am so excited about Freed.

She pointed out how the Media in Australia had become Protagonists in Politics instead of interested observers reporting on the action. Julia herself described some of the ways in which she was attacked in the media and media campaigns against her.

During the evening Julia’s world famous Misogyny speech  was discussed so I just had to watch it today. It was a very well structured and argued speech. Her experience as a lawyer was obvious as she used evidence to build her case with skill. I appreciate a good speech or debate because I understand the techniques used to make it good and the skill required to deliver it effectively. When I was at primary school we had a speech competition every year at every level. My brother made his first speech at only 5 years old. I was 9 when I started at that school and I took part every year until I was 12 and won every competition. At High School I won every year bar one when I came second to a guy called Grant who went on to become a lawyer.

 

Read more »

Hi ho, hi ho, it’s off to die we go

How long before New Zealand has our very own jihadists leaving for foreign wars.

In Australia four brothers have set off to join ISIS…they aren’t likely to be returning in one piece I would imagine…if at all.

Four brothers slipped out of Australia last week to join the fight with Islamic State (Isis) in Syria.

As authorities attempt to contain home-grown terrorists from leaving Australia, the latest recruits from Western Sydney have been labelled “cleanskins” by police agencies because they were completely unknown to intelligence.

The brothers – aged 17, 23, 25 and 28 – told their parents they were going on a holiday to Thailand, according to Sydney’s Daily Telegraph.

The siblings are believed to have travelled to Turkey and crossed the Syrian border in the past week.    Read more »

Photo Of The Day

U. S. Navy photo, Oct. 24, 2003. The Russian Federation Navy Udaloy Class destroyer Marshal Shaposhnikov is believed to be heading towards Australia as part of a Russian convoy.

U. S. Navy photo, Oct. 24, 2003.
The Russian Federation Navy Udaloy Class destroyer Marshal Shaposhnikov is believed to be heading towards Australia as part of a Russian convoy.

Russians Warships Headed for Australia

Read more »

Cut the corporate welfare and lower taxes before Australia

The IRD is warning the government will have to cut corporate taxes if Australia lowers theirs.

What a good idea.

Inland Revenue has warned the Government may have to consider cutting the company tax rate next year if Australia drops its rate.

In a briefing to Revenue Minister Todd McClay, the tax department said New Zealand’s aging population could result in pressure to raise taxes to pay for health and pensions.

But it said the Government would need to take into account developments in other countries when considering company tax, which was cut from 30 per cent to 28 per cent in 2011, undercutting Australia’s 30 per cent rate.

“Tax changes in Australia should continue to be monitored as they can have important implications for New Zealand,” Inland Revenue said. “A particular focus will be Australia’s White Paper due out at the end of 2015.

“If, for example, there were a substantial reduction in the Australian company tax rate, the question of whether New Zealand should follow suit would arise,” it said.

Read more »

And they said it wouldn’t happen to them

unnamed-1

For some time I’ve been warning various companies that the troughers who beat up on the tobacco  industry are now turning their sights onto products like energy and sugary drinks. They said nah it wouldn’t happen to them.

Well I told them.

In Australia we now see the same tactics once applied to tobacco companies now being applied to anyone employed by energy drinks manufacturers. And it’s happening now.

Deakin University in Australia is currently holding the 1st International Energy Drinks Conference in Victoria.

Here’s how they view participation by anyone from companies that manufacture these drinks.

unnamed-2 Read more »

ISIS is coming? Wrong, they’re already here

Many of the apologists for ISIS, and enablers of terror through their insistence that we all live like they do, on their knees, tell us there is nothing to worry about.

They are wrong.

ISIS is coming? Nope, they are already here.

Look across the Tasman to Australia and you can already see the violence manifesting itself.

A man who was shot outside an Islamic prayer centre in Sydney’s west was targeted as he locked up the building following a night observing the holy ritual of Ashura, one of the most important holidays for Shiite Muslims, according to a community member.

Witnesses claimed that a number of people had driven past the Husainiyah Nabi Akram centre on Rosedale Avenue in Greenacre just hours before the shooting, chanting in Arabic that “ISIS [terrorist group Islamic State] is coming” and “ISIS will stay”.

Islamic State is an extremist organisation made up of Sunni jihadists and is involved in a violent conflict against Shiites and other groups in Iraq.

Rasoul Al-Musawi, a 47-year-old Iraqi Shiite religious leader at the centre, was shot in the face and shoulder as he was locking up the centre about 1.15am on Monday.

Witnesses dragged him back into the centre and gave him first aid until paramedics arrived and took him to hospital. He underwent surgery to remove the pellets on Monday.

Jamal Daoud, a prominent member of Sydney’s Shiite community, said a group of “extremists” had been targeting Shiite Muslims trying to enter the centre to observe Ashura, a 10-day ritual to commemorate the death of Imam Hussain, the grandson of Prophet Muhammad.    Read more »

Bring back the biff

Rugby League went all sooky years ago, especially when they banned the biff and brought in gay developments like the judiciary.

Now Paul Gallen has been fined $50,000 for calling someone a c*nt on Twitter.

Cronulla captain Paul Gallen has been handed a $50,000 fine and provisional Kangaroos suspension for a foul-mouthed tirade he made against NRL officials on social media last week.

Gallen has seven days to respond to the breach notice and explain any mitigating factors that might have contributed to his Twitter brain-snapwhile holidaying in Hawaii.

The NRL imposed the heaviest possible code of conduct fine on the Sharks and NSW captain, and he will also be ineligible for Australia selection in 2015 unless he successfully completes a leadership course.

His eligibility would then be reviewed by an ARL commission panel.

And what did he doRead more »

Step 1: Chemical weapons captured Step 2: MIG fighters Step 3: Chemical weapons used

…or so it is claimed.

The play to get the world behind boots on the ground action is marching on.

Dizzy, vomiting and struggling to breathe, 11 Iraqi police officers were rushed to a government hospital 80km north of the capital last month. The diagnosis: poisoning by chlorine gas. The perpetrators, according to the officers: Islamic State extremists.

The chlorine attack appears to be the first confirmed use of chemical weapons by the Islamic State on the battlefield. An Iraqi Defence Ministry official corroborated it, and doctors said survivors’ symptoms were consistent with chlorine poisoning.

I love the “appears to be” leading to the use of “confirmed”.  It’s skillful, no?

It is one of three crude chlorine attacks that Iraqi forces say have occurred since the extremists seized vast tracts of Iraqi territory this summer, although details on the other two incidents remain sketchy. The reported assaults raise concerns that the militants are attempting to hone their chemical weapons capabilities as they push to seize more ground.

Say to  have occurred.   Read more »

Finally a minister who gets that driverless cars and not trains is our future

Simon Bridges appears to get it.

That our future lies in enabling technologies not restrictive technologies.

Trains are constrained by tracks and are not at all versatile, whereas driverless vehicles are enabling in many, many ways.

The prospect of cars travelling New Zealand highways with no one behind the wheel is moving closer says new Transport Minister Simon Bridges. Officials are reviewing legislation allowing for the testing of umanned autonomous vehicles on public roads.

Mr Bridges has pledged to work with environmental interests while also pursuing the Government’s road building programme.

Mr Bridges said he was committed to “a balanced approach” and ongoing investment roads were important even from a green perspective, “over time as we move to electric vehicles and autonomous vehicles”.

Mr Bridges said the Government was not doing a great deal to accommodate autonomous vehicle technology, “but I don’t think there’s any doubt that if you look at what’s going on internationally, maybe not in the next couple of years, but over time we will see driverless vehicles and that will have implications, like for example less congestion because vehicles can travel closer together”.

Read more »

In times of trouble you find out who your real friends are, often they are the ‘enemy’

I can relate to this:

Barry Cohen is a lovely man and as a Hawke Government Minister summed up the best of Labor – compassionate but practical, romantic but no dreamer, improver not revolutionary. Add, of course, he’s a man with great faith in Western civllisation.

He today writes that he has dementia and has had had to move into a nursing home:

When word got out that I had joined the list of dementia sufferers one of the first calls I had was from an old “friend”.

“A Mr Howard calling,” was the message from the nurse.

“I don’t know a Mr Howard, unless it’s the former prime minister.”

“That’s the one,” said the nurse.

I was deeply moved that a lifelong opponent had taken the trouble to ring to find out how I was and whether he could do anything to help. After a lengthy conversation, I told him, “This is what makes Australia a great country.”

Great men and women help make a great country. You’ve just heard about two of them.

Read more »