Aviation

Photo Of The Day

Photo: AP

Photo: AP

Remembering the Concorde Crash

¬†Doomed take-off: Air France Concorde flight 4590 burst into flames in 2000 at Paris after runway debris from a Continental DC10 exploded the jet’s fuel tank

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When media mislead – This time it is Fairfax

I noticed this article in this morning’s Stuff.co.nz detailing a light¬†aircraft crash in the USA where the cause is thought to be the pilot
taking ‘selfies’.

A pilot who lost control while taking selfies was likely the cause of a small plane crash that killed two men this past spring, according to US federal investigators.

Pilot Amritpal Singh, 29, and his passenger were killed instantly when Singh’s Cessna 150K crashed into a wheat field shortly after midnight May 31. The wreckage was discovered around 7am local time that morning.

A GoPro camera mounted to the plane’s windshield recorded Singh and several other passengers taking selfies on their mobile phones during a series of short flights before the crash, the US National Transportation Safety Board found. While the GoPro didn’t record the flight where Singh crashed, investigators portrayed a pattern of the pilot taking selfies and possibly texting while giving rides to passengers above Front Range Airport, about 40 kilometres east of Denver.

“During the climb-out portion of flight, the pilot uses his mobile phone to take a self photograph. The camera’s flash was activated and illuminated the cockpit area,” NTSB investigators reported. “During the climb-out phase, the pilot was seen making keyboard entries to his cell phone and additional keyboard entries on a portion of flight consistent with the downwind leg.”

Singh landed safely after that flight, picked up another passenger, and took off again, crashing a few minutes later.

This is a story in the World section and actually occurred in the United States, and involves a specific aircraft…a Cessna 150K.

Stuff ¬†however,¬†for some reason, chose to use a photo of the New Zealand aircraft¬†ZK-RXL that crashed in Waimate late last year.¬† ¬† Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: OSHA Words "BYE BYE" and drawings in oily residue on the tail of a United Airlines 747-400 prompted 13 flight attendants to refuse to fly from San Francisco to Hong Kong on July 14, 2014, until the plane was thoroughly searched for explosives. United fired the flight attendants and cancelled the flight. The Flight attendants are asking the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for reinstatement, back pay and other damages. [Via MerlinFTP Drop]

Photo: OSHA
Words “BYE BYE” and drawings in oily residue on the tail of a United Airlines 747-400 prompted 13 flight attendants to refuse to fly from San Francisco to Hong Kong on July 14, 2014, until the plane was thoroughly searched for explosives. United fired the flight attendants and cancelled the flight. The Flight attendants are asking the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for reinstatement, back pay and other damages. [Via MerlinFTP Drop]

‚ÄėBye, Bye‚Äô

The Flight You Would Not Want To Be On

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Dronelining

Photo / Doug Sherring, via NZ Herald

Photo / Doug Sherring, via NZ Herald

A Kiwi invention that uses a drone to take much of the hassle out of fishing is gaining global attention.

From his garage in Auckland, electrical engineer and project manager Kyle Parshotam has been designing and building high-tech “fishing drones” that can haul line hundreds of metres out to sea and drop the bait right in front of fish – upping the odds of landing a big one.

The carbon-fibre aircraft – dubbed the AeroKontiki – can hover for up to 12 minutes and has been built to fly up to 500m with the maximum height locked at 60m.

It also has two GPS systems that allow it to return to shore on autopilot.

“It’s fast – you can deploy the line very quickly with the whole mission just taking a few minutes,” Parshotam said.

“And you can also use it in some pretty harsh environments where you’ve got rocks and big surf which traditional kontikis can’t go through. You can be quite precise with where you drop your bait.”

I guess it’s the next step in the progression using tech, but I’m not sure I’m going to enjoy the idea of a bunch of those buzzing away in popular fishing spots. ¬†¬† Read more »

Tagged:

Selfish fat bastard overflows seat and forces other passenger to stand

overweight-passenger-on-a-plane-pic-getty-images-112387867

Fat bastards who overflow airline seats should be made to pay extra.

I mean you are charged for excess baggage but not for excess guts.

A passenger has complained to an airline after she was squeezed out of her seat by an obese man – and forced to spend most of a trans-Tasman flight standing in the aisle.

Caralyn Young, of Tawa, says she was crammed in next to the man on the fully booked flight from Brisbane to Wellington last Monday night.¬† Read more »

Photo Of The Day

The story behind a famous photograph of an ejection from a Lightning. The photograph was taken by Jim Meads on 13 September 1962. It was published in newspapers all around the world at the time and, as it was so widely seen, it naturally caught the attention of manufacturer Martin-Baker.

The story behind a famous photograph of an ejection from a Lightning. The photograph was taken by Jim Meads on 13 September 1962. It was published in newspapers all around the world at the time and, as it was so widely seen, it naturally caught the attention of manufacturer Martin-Baker.

English Electric Lightning:Eject! Eject!

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Photo Of The Day

This legendary 1973 photo by Bob Gruen of Led Zeppelin standing in front of their own ‚ÄúLed Zeppelin Airplane‚ÄĚ helped make the band bigger than life.

This legendary 1973 photo by Bob Gruen of Led Zeppelin standing in front of their own ‚ÄúLed Zeppelin Airplane‚ÄĚ helped make the band bigger than life.

‚ÄúThe Starship‚ÄĚ

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Herald now writing stories from plane spotters

So it looks like the Herald is taking uncorroborated panic stories off plane-spotters now?

An airliner about to land at Auckland Airport climbed sharply to avoid a potential collision with another plane taking off at the other end of the runway.

“It climbed like a bloody blizzard and the other plane was nose up and was taking off too,” said a witness to the manoeuvre, which the Airways Corporation and Air New Zealand are putting down to standard procedure.

The man, who did not want to be named, was parked at a lookout near the airport just after 6pm on Monday while waiting to watch a giant Airbus 380 take off.

Ahead of it in a taxiway queue was a 171-seat Air New Zealand Airbus 320 due to fly to Christchurch, while another of the airline’s A320s was on its descent from the east, flying in from Adelaide.

“You could see this plane coming in to land – it would have been between the [Southwestern] motorway and the end of the runway – then suddenly the other A320 just moved out into the runway,” the witness said.

“I thought, ‘that’s close’, but it just paused on the end of the runway – for about 10 seconds. Then it just gasses and starts rolling down the runway to takeoff speed.”

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What a waste of money and all for nothing

Australia has outspent everyone else in the fruitless search for MH370. And it is all for nothing with everyone being no closer now to finding the aircraft than at the start of the whole bizarre episode.

Conspiracy theories aside, basically the plane is gone, the passengers and crew are all dead, there is little point in trying to find it now.

The Malaysian Government has revealed it has spent just a fraction of what Australia has paid in the search for missing flight MH370, as officials from both countries prepare to meet to discuss the next phase of the mission.

Officials from Malaysia yesterday held talks in Canberra, including discussions around funding for the operation. The Australian Government has set aside almost A$90 million ($99 million) for the search.

The head of the joint task force charged with finding MH370, Angus Houston, said yesterday that discussions around the next phase of the search included negotiations with Malaysia over the cost of the search.

“The Government has allocated A$89.9 million. I think about A$25 million of that is to go to the defence force for the visual search they conducted,” the former defence force chief said. “There’s another A$60 million that’s been allocated for the underwater search. That money has been allocated but we’re still to crunch, or still to negotiate the burden-sharing with, for example, Malaysia.”

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Apparently it is because of Climate Change that the search for MH370 took so long

No I’m not kidding, the same folks who contributed to the Ship of Fools debacle are now spinning that the slow recovery operations in the southern Indian Ocean is because of climate change and searches in coming years for planes that set down in the ocean down there (so far only the one) will be harder to find because of climate change.

James Delingpole explains at Breitbart London.

The answer to that one is a big “no” by the way, but that certainly hasn’t stopped the usual green suspects trying to shoehorn the Malaysian tragedy into their grand universal theory of everything.

Here’s how an enterprising environmental reporter has managed it¬†at¬†Mother Jones:

Scientists say man-made climate change has fundamentally altered the currents of the vast, deep oceans where investigators are currently scouring for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight, setting a complex stage for the ongoing search for MH370. If the Boeing 777 did plunge into the ocean somewhere in the vicinity of where the Indian Ocean meets the Southern Ocean, the location where its debris finally ends up, if found at all, may be vastly different from where investigators could have anticipated 30 years ago.

Possibly there’s a bait and switch operation going on here. None of the three scientists quoted in the article makes mention of plane debris: they just talk about the changing nature of recent patterns in the Southern Oceans which, almost inevitably, they ascribe to man-made climate change and which they insist is a cause for great concern.¬† Read more »