Bavaria

Germans protesting Islamification

Germans are fed up with the constant drive towards Islamification of their nation.

A new type of anti-immigration protest is sweeping across Germany, as thousands take to the streets against what they say is the growing “Islamisation” of the country.

The new protests, which began in the city of Dresden in the former East Germany, feature no neo-Nazi slogans and have nothing to do with the traditional far right.

Instead the demonstrators have adopted the old rallying call of the protests against the East German communist regime that brought down the Berlin Wall 25 years ago, “Wir sind das Volk”, or “We are the people”. They say they want to preserve Germany’s Judeo-Christian Western culture.

The protests come as Bavaria’s ruling Christian Social Union (CSU) is seeking to distance itself from a draft proposal for its party conference which said that immigrants should speak German not only in public, but at home as well.

Germany is now the second most popular destination in the world for migrants, after the US, and the country is struggling to cope with an unprecedented influx of asylum-seekers.   Read more »

There will be a death for sure when the killer cows find out they have to wear nappies

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Forget Killer Cows, you are going to see Homicidal, mad as all hell psychopathic cows when they get wind of plans for them to wear nappies in Bavaria.

The other farm animals will likely die from laughter.

Bavarian farmers are angry that their famous Alpine dairy cows will apparently have to wear nappies under European Union environmental laws.

Johann Huber, whose family has farmed on the mountain slopes of Gmund am Tegernsee for over 400 years, has begun putting home made nappies on his 18 diary cows to avoid falling foul of an EU fertiliser ban.

Mr Huber said that his cow Doris had behaved well when he fitted her with a home made bovine nappy to prevent her dropping cow pats on the Alpine slopes.

“We have no standard nappies, they have not been developed commercially yet,” he said.

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Dinosaurs of a feather

The Australian

It has long been thought that dinosaurs were related to birds…the proof is mounting as well, the latest being a full skeleton of a dinosaur with feathers:

German researchers have discovered a fossil of a feathered hatchling that may be the earliest evidence of a plumed, meat-eating dinosaur that was not closely related to birds.

The fossil is believed to belong to a young land-based dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period, some 170 million years ago, said a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Named Sciurumimus albersdoerferi, in part after its bushy, squirrel-like tail – tree squirrels come from the genus Sciurus – it is the “most complete megalosauroid fossil yet”, the study said.

Megalosauroid is the name for a wide-ranging group of carnivorous dinosaurs that could grow as big as 9m long and weigh up to one tonne.

The fossil, which shows a juvenile dinosaur with its jaws open and tail extending far over its head, was found in a quarry in Bavaria, Germany.

The hatchling likely had a large skull, shorter hind limbs and smooth skin with feathers covering its entire body.

Why Suppression doesn’t work

Sydney Morning Herald

The Bavarian Government is going to republish Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf after a ban of more than 67 years. The case shows why in suppression anything, including books and even names just leads to the creation of a conspiracy. People want to know why something is suppressed, or who is hiding, when the opposite of suppression, that of openness often leads to the same ends that suppression was attempting to do.

For me we shouldn’t ban things that are distasteful or offensive, we should mock the ideas, subject them to ridicule. To suppress them just gives them credence.

The truth is that in this digital world, there’s no such thing as suppression any more. Just ask the state government of Bavaria, which has decided to republish Adolf Hitler’s 1925 work Mein Kampf before the book’s copyright expires in 2015.

Rights to the book are owned by the Bavarian finance ministry, though publication of the work has been banned in Germany since 1945.

So why offer formal state publication to this book, from which the German people, on the whole, have spent the past 67 years firmly distancing themselves?

Because the book is so widely available – you can find the whole thing with a few keystrokes – that the only purpose being served by formal suppression is the conferment of an illicit thrill for those who track it down.

To publish the book in all its ugliness and stupidity and leaden prose, its fascinatingly silly perorations on racial purity – ”the titmouse seeks the titmouse,” intones the Fuehrer, at one point, in all seriousness – this is, in the present environment, the best way to strip the work permanently of its appeal to residual fans.

Deprived of its titillating suppression order, this banned book becomes … a book. A bad book, at that, for all sorts of reasons – most of which become thuddingly clear upon cracking it open. Similarly treated, a conspiracy theory becomes a theory, just like any other – nothing more.