BBC

Amazing cancer cure but BBC won’t say where it came from

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

Imagine an article about an amazing cancer drug that has cured 58% of terminally ill patients. A drug cocktail so amazing and effective that the United Kingdom has approved it in record time in order to make it available for their National Health Service. Now imagine an article about it written for the BBC that tells us everything except who is actually responsible for this amazing breakthrough in cancer research. Here is the article. As you can see no mention at all is made of where the cure came from.

Given the worldwide media bias that you know of, which country to you think this cure came from?

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Photo Of The Day

0126-bigbkofhoaxes

The Riot That Never Was

“Unemployed demonstration in London. The crowd has now passed along Whitehall and, at the suggestion of Mr Popplebury, Secretary of the National Movement for Abolishing Theatre Queues, is preparing to demolish the Houses of Parliament with trench mortars. […] The clock tower, 320 feet in height, has just fallen to the ground, together with the famous clock Big Ben, which used to strike the hours on a bell weighing nine tons.”

– Ronald Knox, Broadcasting the Barricades

In January 1926, the BBC sparked a national panic …

It broadcast a 12-minute report of a murderous riot in central London, which turned out to be a spoof, masterminded by a literary priest.

The show was the work of a Catholic priest, a satirist, and a writer of detective fiction who all happened to be the same man: Father Ronald Arbuthnott Knox. Knox penned the skit to poke fun at the BBC, because he believed his countrymen took what they heard on the radio too seriously. But he copied the style of BBC news bulletins so well that some listeners mistook his satire for the real thing.

Broadcasting the Barricades “reported” that a mob of unemployed workers were attacking London and lynching government ministers. A portion of Knox’s audience apparently believed these reports to be true, because newspapers and the BBC soon found themselves overwhelmed with calls about the fictitious uprising. This incident is often cited as a predecessor to the alleged panic surrounding Orson Welles’s 1938 War of the Worlds broadcast. But, as with the later show, there are definite indications that the reports of hysteria surrounding Knox’s broadcast were exaggerated. The BBC, for instance, later reported receiving an influx of mail from listeners who enjoyed the show, as Welles and CBS would in 1938.

Knox, interrupted an apparently genuine BBC talk on 18th century literature with a report that Big Ben had been toppled by trench mortars, the Savoy Hotel torched, and a Government minister lynched.

The Russian revolution was then less than a decade old, the General Strike already in preparation. 

In this febrile atmosphere, many took Knox’s satire seriously, besieging the BBC with worried phone calls. Bad weather delayed delivery of the next day’s papers, giving rural listeners prolonged reason to assume the capital was in flames.
The BBC made several announcements later that evening that the programme had been ‘a burlesque’ but these assurances went largely unheard.

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Much lulz in this 2006 BBC drama/documentary, they get everything wrong

Enjoy watching this video from 2006 where the BBC looks at our demand for energy…it was a blend of documentary and drama.

Here is their blurb.

The demand for energy has risen relentlessly over the last 150 years in line with industrial development and population growth.

And as economies of developing countries like China and India continue to grow, it is predicted demand will rise by a further 50% by 2030.   Read more »

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How gay is the BBC?

This gay:

Jeremy Vine, the BBC radio presenter, has been reported under the broadcaster’s “equality and diversity code” for saying he had man flu.

The 50-year-old broadcaster revealed he was suffering from a persistent cough at night after falling ill a few days ago during a feature about Victorian ailments on his Radio 2 lunchtime show.

He referred to his “man flu” while talking to Dr Sarah Jarvis about whooping cough – a highly contagious bacterial infection of the lungs – and other illnesses common in the 1800s.   Read more »

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I agree with Delingpole, Tyson Fury was robbed

James Delingpole explains why Tyson Fury should have been the BBC Personality of the year.

Tyson Fury has been a personal hero of mine ever since he told an interviewer that “a woman’s best place is in the kitchen and on her back….making me a good cup of tea.”

I also was also quite entertained by his remarks about homosexuality, which he thinks should be banned and which he equates with paedophilia.

It’s not so much that I necessarily agree with every last word of his sentiments. (I wouldn’t dare. My wife would kill me. Also, I personally think I’m a better cook and tea-maker than her so she’s better off doing the washing). Rather, what I admire is his sheer, bloody-minded, fuck-you, Trump-style outspokenness.  

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BBC Religion and Ethics department accused of bias

In yet another example of the influence of Islam within Western countries, a group of Hindu and Sikh leaders have accused the BBC of making a disproportionate number of programmes on Islam at the expense of covering other Asian religions.

A breakdown of programming from the BBC’s Religion and Ethics department, seen by The Independent, reveals that since 2001, the BBC made 41 faith programmes on Islam, compared with just five on Hinduism and one on Sikhism.
Critics say the disproportionate amount of programming is part of an apparent bias within the BBC towards Islam since the attacks of 11 September 2001, which has placed an often uncomfortable media spotlight on Britain’s Muslims.

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The ‘inexcusable bias’ of the BBC over Israel

The BBC is much like Radio NZ, a veritable feast of lefty dogma. But a former chairman of the BBC has spoken out against what he calls the ‘inexcusable bias’ of the BBC in reporting events in Israel.

The BBC is facing a new row over its coverage of Israel, after former chairman Michael Grade accused the broadcaster of an ‘inexcusable’ bias.

Lord Grade claimed that the BBC ‘directly misled’ viewers in a report about the recent wave of stabbing attacks on Israelis, by failing to show militant Palestinian groups praising the attacks.

Over the last two months, seven Israelis have been killed and dozens have been wounded in a shooting, a stoning and a series of stabbings.

At least 40 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli fire, including several identified by Israel as attackers.

But in a letter to BBC director of news James Harding, Lord Grade accused the BBC of drawing unfair comparisons between the Israeli victims of terrorism, and Palestinians terrorists who had been killed by Israeli forces trying to stop them.

It created an ‘equivalence between Israeli victims of terrorism and Palestinians who have been killed by Israeli security forces in the act of carrying out terror attacks,’ he said.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: BBC: You Tube. Andrew Gardner reading the news on the BBC, before The Voice of Vrillon interrupted him.

Photo: BBC: You Tube.
Andrew Gardner reading the news on the BBC, before The Voice of Vrillon rudely interrupted him.

The Voice of Vrillon

The mysterious Southern Television broadcast hijack of 1977

The 26 November 1977 was a deeply cold night in England. The regional station Southern Television was just beginning its evening news bulletin and families across South-East England gathered together in their living rooms to watch the news. Children waited impatiently for Looney Tunes, which they knew would be shown directly after the news programme.

As Andrew Gardner read out news of the conflict in Rhodesia, a hissing, shuffling sound drowned out his voice. Suddenly, a booming voice addressed the startled viewers, as the screen still showed the oblivious newsreader reading through the day’s headlines.

Local news bulletins don’t often become the news generally. A little after 5pm on Saturday 26th November 1977, the transmission of the local UK television station Southern News bulletin made worldwide headlines when it was overridden by an external broadcast from an individual claiming to represent the Ashtar Galactic Command.

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Why are the “refugees” mostly male and fighting age?

Source/ BBC

Source/ BBC

The photo above is like many already out there talking about the so-called “refugee” problem facing Europe.

The BBC says that these “refugees” are demanding freedom to travel from Hungary to Germany. But look closely at the photo, and indeed many others…tell me where are the women “refugees”, or the child “refugees” and the old “refugees” and the infirm refugees”?

Why are all the “refugees” of fighting age and male?

And the next question is this…why travel to Europe when there are extremely wealthy Muslim countries much, much closer…like Egypt and Saudi Arabia, and even Turkey or the Gulf states like Dubai, Kuwait, Abu Dhabi etc?

As the crisis brews over Syrian refugees trying to enter European countries, questions have been raised over why they are not heading to wealthy Gulf states closer to home.

Although those fleeing the Syrian crisis have for several years been crossing into Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey in huge numbers, entering other Arab states – especially in the Gulf – is far less straightforward.

Officially, Syrians can apply for a tourist visa or work permit in order to enter a Gulf state.    Read more »

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Dyke calls breastfeeding “unnatural”

A BBC radio DJ thinks that fat, ugly chicks shouldn’t be allowed to breastfeed, only yummy mummies.

A BBC local radio DJ sparked an outcry after claiming unattractive mothers should be banned from breastfeeding in public.

Alex Dyke said the practice was indulged by “librarian-type, moustached” women.

He claimed he was embarrassed after seeing a “big girl” breastfeeding on a bus and claimed “yummy mummies” know it’s “not a great look”. But following an angry backlash from listeners the BBC has suspended the broadcaster pending an investigation and is facing calls to sack him.

By yesterday more than 5,000 people had signed a petition calling for him to be axed from his job at BBC Radio Solent.    Read more »