Bill English

Matt should show this graph to David Cunliffe

David Cunliffe apparently had no idea about polls over the weekend and had he known about it he said he wouldn’t have had a holiday.

This is of course a lie, because all media go to the leaders prior to running polls for comments.

But he should really look at this chart from Danyl McLauchlan:

Updated the tracking poll. For variety’s sake this one goes all the way back to the start of 2005. It doesn’t correct for bias and the large circles intersecting the vertical lines are election results:

nzpolls20140721nobiascorr Read more »

Good moves by National on local body politics

National has announced some good initiatives around local body politics today, while Labour is splurging even more money at a sector that can and does does the citizens hard already.

The Government will “crowdsource” for new ideas on how to get rid of “dumb” local and central government regulations, Prime Minister John Key says.

He told the Local Government New Zealand conference in Nelson today that a Rules Reduction Task Force would be established in response to the latest Productivity Commission report. The task force would look at local and central government regulation.

Some rules homeowners faced were “dumb” and “needless bureaucratic hurdles”, Key said.

“Some things on the face of it don’t make much sense, like making it compulsory for a homeowner to install windows in a room that already lets in a lot of light through the ranch-slider doors,” Key told delegates.

The task force would be comprised of officials and tradespeople to “root out local regulation that could be improved”.

“We already know there are property owners up and down the country who are frustrated with the regulatory requirements they must meet, and the time and money it takes to complete transactions,” Key said.

“The decisions that councils make on regulation affect the whole country.”

Finance Minister Bill English has said that local government rules added to construction costs.

Key said the task force would develop ideas with the public.

“It is my intention that we invite ratepayers and homeowners around the country to contribute their thoughts on removing unnecessary rules and regulations via email and social media,” Key said.

“If you like, we’ll be crowdsourcing ways to reduce the rules and regulations that stop people doing sensible things with their own properties.”

“There are some things that homeowners go through because councils are required to implement regulations and rules which are completely outdated, that were written for a particular reason but which no longer work,” Key said after his speech.

“Essentially what we’re going to say to New Zealanders is ‘look, if you can see crazy rules and regulations that you have to comply with, that make no sense, email them to us’.

“We think we’ll be able to do a rewrite of a lot of those regulations, particularly for property owners.”

Read more »

Could convergence become an issue

Labour continues to be mired in the 20s, the Greens are slowly climbing towards the 20s…hoovering up the disaffected hard left of Labour as The Cunliffe continues to disappoint.

Could convergence become an issue, where the Greens supplant Labour as the largest opposition party.

Matthew Hooton discussed that in his column at the NBR:

Don’t rule out convergence.

Labour’s disastrous decision to replace David Shearer with David Cunliffe and spend nearly a year swinging to the far left has inevitably crashed its poll numbers.

The recent ploy to swing back to the centreappears to have come too late. The days are long gone when Mr Shearer had Labour polling around the mid-30s and, with the Greens in the low teens, well on track to become prime minister. In both the major polls released this week, Roy Morgan and Fairfax-Ipsos, Mr Cunliffe’s Labour was languishing under 25%.

Both polls were taken mainly after Mr Cunliffe’s apology for being a man, but also after his major education announcements. Despite Labour strategists privately claiming their internal polling responded favourably, the public polls suggest that the promises of cheap laptops and slightly smaller classes have failed to capture the imagination of middle-class parents.

Worse for Labour, while there may be good evidence the polls tend to overestimate National’s support by around 5% at the expense of smaller parties, the trend line for Labour in at least the last two elections has almost exactly predicted its actual party vote.

In 2011, Phil Goff led Labour to its worst result since 1925. If Mr Cunliffe’s tilt to the centre continues to fail, he risks taking New Zealand’s oldest political party below the 24% it won in the first two elections following the World War I.

Poll numbers also have an element of self-fulfilling prophecy. People don’t like voting for losers. As the election nears, Labour risks losing a crucial few further points to the Greens, Internet-Mana and NZ First.

Bill English currently wears the electoral dunce cap in the New Zealand parliament, having led National to its 21% debacle in 2002. The finance minister may dare to hope he might finally get to pass it on to Mr Cunliffe after September 20.

For all this, the risk of a change of government remains high.   Read more »

The Predictable Failure of David Cunliffe, Ctd

Cunliffe - Sh_t

The two most recent polls have shown what all of us known.

David Cunliffe has a poo fingered touch, everything he touches turns to poop.

This was entirely predictable.  Read more »

Pot, Kettle, Black Mr Goff, do you remember your own ducking for cover?

I see Phil Goff thinks that the government is ducking for cover over the Malaysian diplomat incident:

The Government has gone to ground in response to the woman at the centre of the Malaysian diplomat scandal speaking out and saying Foreign Affairs Minister Murray McCully should resign.

Mr McCully is en route to Europe and Prime Minister John Key is out of the country on a break.

The acting Prime Minister Bill English also did not want to comment.

“They’re absolutely ducking for cover,” says Labour MP Phil Goff.

Brooke Sabin was probably still in school when a certain incident happened at Darren Hughes landlady’s house in Hataitai.

Wasn’t it Phil Goff who tried to cover up Darren Hughes little incident at his landlady’s house for almost two weeks until Jonathan Marshall flew down to Wellington and busted the case wide open? Why yes it was.  Read more »

Malcolm Harbrow from No Right Turn on Labour’s rape law changes

Malcolm Harbrow from No Right turn is a nasty spiteful hard left acolyte, but occasionally he stumbles in the right direction.

Today he lambasts Labour for proposing to overturn our Bill of Rights and remove the presumption of innocence and the onus of proof onto the defence in rape cases.

This clearly violates the presumption of innocence affirmed in the Bill of Rights Act (not to mention the Universal Declaration of Human RightsICCPR, and every other major human rights instrument). Under that presumption, the state has to prove each and every aspect of its case (“the burden of proof is on he who declares, not on he who denies”). That’s clearly not the case under Labour’s proposal.

Our Supreme Court has already found that the presumption of supply in the Misuse of Drugs Act violates the Bill of Rights Act for exactly these reasons. They will draw exactly the same conclusion about this proposal – as will the UN Human Rights Commission.

I accept that rape cases are difficult to prove. This change will make them remarkably easier. If Labour gets its way, there will be a lot more convictions for rape. And a lot more of them will be of innocent people. We presume innocence because we believe it is far better for the guilty to go free than for the innocent to be punished. Labour clearly does not believe that any more.    Read more »

More good news

images

No matter the amount of effort going in at Labour HQ to paint a picture of National mismanaging the economy (who thought that was going to ever fly?), the evidence to the contrary continues to engulf us like an avalanche.  The Herald’s Business Desk reports   Read more »

Manawatu Standard endorses Josie Pagani’s sentiments

The Manawatu Standard, normally a hotbed of arch socialists has become quite strident in recent weeks against the Labour party.

Yesterday they endorsed the sentiments of Josie Pagani’s 2012 article in the NZ Herald, the one that essentially caused her excommunication from the Labour party for daring to utter the truth. What she wrote back then is as true today as when she wrote it and perhaps even more true.

After Labour was humbled in the 2011 election the party’s Rangitikei candidate had some advice for the party.

Be more positive, Josie Pagani wrote in January 2012 in the New Zealand Herald.

“We were turning up on people’s doorsteps telling them their lives were gloomy. And anyone who has ever been poor knows the last thing you want is someone telling you your life is crap,” she wrote.

Labour had started to forget its roots, she said, that it was a workers’ party with a focus on making the lives of working people better, not a party focused on providing for those who were out of work.

When Labour launched its campaign at its general conference on the weekend it was clear some of Pagani’s message from 2012 had sunk in, or the party had reached the same conclusions independently.

The party’s slogan for 2014 is Vote Positive, with a tick instead of a v for good measure.

It was accompanied yesterday by a call from party leader David Cunliffe for candidates to refrain from sledging members of the opposition.

Read more »

Guest post – Reclaiming the Left – 2014 election

A lefty frustrated at not being able to make this point on left wing blogs without being blocked out, or having comments removed by moderators has politely asked if I will post it.

I have no problem with posting dissenting views or alternate viewpoints, therefore I am happy to post it.


 

Who Do We Want To Win This Year?

This year’s election is being promoted by some of my colleagues on the left as a battle between good and evil.

Usually I’d agree with them; left-wing politics is the politics of community and altruism, right-wing politics is about selfishness.

But not this time. Because some on the left have allied themselves with a fat-cat capitalist fraud.

The “alliance” of Mana and Dotcom’s Internet Party is the greatest treason to the left in New Zealand since Roger Douglas and co. sold Labour down the river in the 1980s.

Dotcom is not a socialist. He didn’t grow up poor. He made millions by sloshing money from one pocket to the other, never created an ounce of real value, and stole from other workers in doing so. Hundreds if not thousands of film workers here and overseas lost their jobs because of Dotcom and his ilk. And not content with just stealing, he also committed insider trading.  Read more »

How many Tax Commissars and Stasi operatives will Labour need?

Labour's new tax commissars line up outside IRD's Stasi HQ

Labour’s new tax commissars line up outside IRD’s Stasi HQ

Labour’s newest great idea is to establish a Tax Stasi, filled with Tax Commissars who will be “embedded” in businesses that Labour thinks are bastards.

They will be observing what is going on and reporting back to the Tax Stasi Gruppenfuhrer

This is an outrage…you can’t tell me that once the Tax Stasi have finished doing over multi-nationals that Labour won’t suddenly decide to implement more snitches and stasi agents and lower the threshold and rules down to businesses with say $30 million turnover.

What is more of an outrage is labour have exempted banks from the snoopy activities of having Tax Stasi agents roaming the corridors looking for evasion.

If National had done something like that Labour would be accusing them of cosying up to bankers, and corporate cronyism…like they do now over insurance companies?

You do have to wonder though if one of labour’s aor David Cunliffe’s major secret donors is bank or someone associated with banks.

There are serious questions though…surely if they are targeting tax dodgers and rorters then the unions should have Tax Commissars assigned to them, in particular Unite Union, with their history of non-compliance. Or will Labour except unions from having Tax Stasi Agents sitting in their offices.

In other matters you can tell they don’t know what to do about almost everything because they have retained their promise for us to trust them, they know what they are doing, look we will appoint an Expert Panel.

Expert Panel : An Expert Panel will be established to deal with issues that are technical in nature and involve areas where a high degree of specialised knowledge is required before a final decision can be reached.

This policy will raise an additional $25 million in its first year, growing in outyears to reach $1 billion a year by 2020/21.

Read more »