Bill Shorten

This is what happens when you bash wogs, abos, and boat people

Tony Abbott has had a dramatic turn around in the polls after he launched into wogs, abos, boat people and bludgers.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has made up ground against Opposition Leader Bill Shorten but Labor continues to be ahead of the Coalition ahead of the next week’s critical federal budget.

A Newspoll, published by The Australian on Tuesday, shows Mr Abbott and Mr Shorten are now equally preferred PM by 38 per cent of voters each.

This is a large improvement for Mr Abbott who trailed Mr Shorten by 11 points in March.   Read more »

Who should we blame for Islamic Terror coming to our shores?

Andrew Bolt says it is the politicians fault, more specifically those politicians who were responsible “through years of reckless immigration and refugee policies.

I ACCUSE Australia’s political class of a crime. Of wilfully ­endangering the safety of ­Australians.

They — with much media help — have put Australians in danger through years of reckless immigration and refugee policies.

And it’s come to what we saw on Saturday — anti-terrorism police in Melbourne ­arresting five more young men from Muslim families, two for allegedly plotting attacks on police on Anzac Day.

These men were allegedly associates of Numan Haider, an Afghan refugee and Islamic State supporter who last year stabbed two Victorian policemen before being shot dead.

Police have been typically coy about identifying exactly which “community” the five were from, refusing in two press conferences on Saturday to even mention the words “Islam” or “Muslim”.

But their use of the word “community” made clear they meant something other than the Australian one.

The fact is we have imported people from “communities” so at odds with our own that a minority of members has declared war on our institutions, our police and even — allegedly — Anzac Day, the most potent symbol of our nationhood.

We are going to have the same problem here in New Zealand, with years of the Clark administration pandering to Islamic refugees.

[T]he hard facts remain. Of the 21 Australians jailed for terrorism offences so far this century, all were Muslim. Most were born overseas. Most of the rest are children of immigrants from Muslim countries.

Add the following: some 150 Australian Muslims have enlisted with barbaric terrorist groups of the Middle East, ­notably Islamic State.

Another 100 Australians thought likely to join them have had their passports confiscated, and some 200 have been pulled off planes.

Meanwhile ASIO is investigating 400 other cases involving Islamist threats.

This is an astonishing harvest of danger from a Muslim community here of fewer than 500,000 people.

Compare: we have more than 400,000 Buddhists, yet not one Buddhist has been convicted here of terrorism ­offences or shot a hostage in a Sydney cafe in the name of their faith.

There is undeniably something different about Islam, or at least the way many interpret it.

New Zealand needs to halt Islamic immigration, and possibly seek to reverse it.

So who is to blame for this problem in Australia? Bolt blames liberal elites.

[W]ith the dangers now so obvious, it’s time to call out those who so blindly exposed us to them.

There is Malcolm Fraser, the Liberal prime minister who ignored official warnings in 1976 that many refugees he was taking in from the Lebanese civil war were unskilled, illiterate and “of questionable character’’, meaning ‘’the conflicts, tensions and divisions within Lebanon will be transferred to Australia’’. Too true.

There’s Paul Keating, who, before becoming another high-immigration prime minister, overturned the Hawke government’s decision to deny permanent residency to Grand Mufti Taj Din al-Hilali, a hate preacher who went on to call the September 11 terror attacks “God’s work against oppressors”.

There’s Kevin Rudd, who as prime minister scrapped our tough border laws, opening the doors to 50,000 illegal boat people.

There is Rudd again, who, when warned by Liberal MP Wilson Tuckey that among the many peaceful boat people could be a terrorist or two, damned Tuckey to media applause for “divisive and disgusting remarks”.

There’s current Labor leader Bill Shorten, who still opposes the Abbott Government’s successful border policies and last year suggested we repeat Fraser’s mistake in response to wars in Iraq and Syria: “Perhaps it’s time to discuss do we take more refugees from these countries.”

And there’s even Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Yes, Abbott has stopped the boats, but even he still pandered to radical Muslim “representatives” he should have shunned, for instance consulting the Islamic Friendship Association’s Keysar Trad, described by the NSW Supreme Court as a “dangerous and disgraceful individual” who “incites people to commit acts of violence”.

Even Abbott cops it. And then the media…

Disturbingly, much of the media has gone alone with this great denial.

SBS notoriously refused to screen video it shot just days before the September 11 ­attacks which showed our Mufti Hilali praising suicide bombers as “heroes”.

And “human rights” lawyer and writer Julian Burnside this year claimed “the Islamophobia stirred up by Abbott and Bolt is a bigger threat to us than terrorism”.

This denial most stop.

Our refugee intake must be stricter, taking fewer people from cultures likely to clash with our own.

And we must be slower to shut down debates with screams of “racist”.

If you fear racists, then fear the ugly fallout if police one day fail to stop an Anzac Day plot by people that more prudent politicians would have kept out.

Our politicians are pretty squeamish, they need to remember that they are there to represent us, not pander to offshore moaners.

 

– Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun

 

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Shanking a union boss with his own stupidty

I love Australian politics, it is as brutal as it is beautiful. There are no sooks and they play for keeps.

A union boss has recently tried to rinse a Labor party veteran out of the party because he dared to support privatisation in New South Wales.

He got all the other affiliated unions to line up behind him in the move, and then he got shanked in a beautiful piece of skullduggery using his own stupidity.

The union official who began a push to expel Labor veteran Martin Ferguson from the ALP for his views on privatisation believes the official story of how the Twin Towers in New York were brought down on September 11, 2001 is a conspiracy that does not stand up to scientific scrutiny.

Maritime Union of Australia official Kevin Bracken last week moved a motion condemning Mr Ferguson for publicly supporting power privatisation in New South Wales during the recent state election and urging the Victorian branch of the Labor Party to kick him out. That motion was unanimously passed by all state leaders of affiliated unions.

Mr Bracken told Fairfax Media on Wednesday that he did not resile from his views – expressed in an interview with the ABC’s Jon Faine back in 2010 – that “the official story is a conspiracy theory that doesn’t stand up to scientific scrutiny”.    Read more »

Australia, the first ever nation to win a Darwin award?

Well one columnist in Australia thinks they should win a Darwin Award for being dumber than a sack of hammers.

I’M THINKING of setting up a national version of the Darwin Awards; you know, where they give an award to the stupidest way people manage to kill themselves each year, or, as the website puts it, “contribute to human evolution by self-selecting themselves out of the gene pool via death or sterilisation by their own actions”.

When I say “national”, I mean it literally – my Darwin Awards aren’t for people, they’re for nations. I’m going to hand out an annual prize for the dumbest, most imbecilic country on the planet that is setting out to destroy its own comfortable way of life via its own moronic actions.

I’m going to find the one nation that’s doing the equivalent of putting its head out of the train window to see if there’s a tunnel approaching.

And right now, Australia looks like being the 2014 National Darwin Award winner. Why? Because we are among the most collectively stupid people on the planet. Just look at the statistics – or rather, the opinion polls.

Apparently, a majority of us think Bill Shorten would be a better prime minister of our country than Tony Abbott.

Let me run that past you again – slowly this time, really slowly, because it’s obvious there are some pretty slow people out there: a … majority … (in other words, enough voters to win an election) … think … (i.e. have apparently used what passes for their brains and come to this conclusion) … that Bill Shorten … (a bloke who is so empty-headed he once said: “I don’t know what Julia Gillard said, but I agree with every word of it”) … would be a better prime minister … (in other words, be making every single decision every single day for three years that will determine the prosperity and financial success of every one of us and all our children) … than Tony Abbott (a bloke who, regardless of whether you like him or not, has as his sole focus a single-minded determination to fix the economic mess that this country is in).

Come again? Are we for real?

The best Darwin Awards always have a neat slice of bitter irony to them; like the guy who tries to impress his fiancee by climbing on to her balcony – on the 101st floor.

The irony with our National Darwin winner – Australia – is that the very bloke Australians want as their next prime minister was part of the team that got us into our financial mess in the first place.

Worse, Shorten is either so dumb or so devious that he is now opposing the very same $5 billion worth of cuts to spending that he supported when he was in government.

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Australian Labor Party leader Bill Shorten headlines Labour Congress

It’s a pretty sad sign that you have to get an Aussie to come be your headline act at your own Congress.

Australia’s Labor Party leader Bill Shorten said he believes further improvements can be made to the rights of New Zealanders living in Australia, but stopped short of making any specific commitments.

Mr Shorten and Labour leader David Cunliffe held talks yesterday after Mr Shorten travelled over to speak at the Labour Party’s election year Congress today.

It is believed to be the first time the leader of Australia’s Labor Party has addressed its New Zealand counterpart’s annual conference.

Mr Shorten said he and Mr Cunliffe had discussed the long-standing issue of New Zealanders being denied benefits such as social security assistance in Australia, while Australians did qualify for those measures here.

“We do believe we could do more work to investigate what further improvements could be made to make the lives of New Zealanders living in Australia, and Australians living in New Zealand easier.

There’s nothing specific in terms of making a commitment today, but I recognise Australia benefits from the contribution of permanent residents born in New Zealand and we should make sure where there are bureaucratic red tape problems that we work together to eliminate them in the best interests of both our people.”

Shorten and Cunliffe make a good pair.  Hot air to fill empty promises are their trademark.  Read more »

Sledge of the Day

I was going to give John Key sledge of the day for his hit on David Cunliffe’s recycling of Rodney Hide’s epithet for the budget…but I’ve found a better sledge.

It was from Christopher Pyne in the Australian parliament against Bill Shorten, and to round it off he called Shorten a c**t .

What a coincidence – we think the same of Russel Norman, but please make Pete and Travis’ day ok by remembering our moderation rules.  Read more »

Abbott to slash $10bn off corporate welfare

The corporate bludgers in Australia are about to get a hair cut…a $10 billion hair cut…as Tony Abbott seeks to shave he corporate welfare budget.

CORPORATE welfare will be slashed in a bid to wean the nation off $10 billion in business aid, as the Abbott government fights off fears it will slap new taxes on ­families without forcing others to shoulder some of the budget ­burden.

Taking a knife to industry assistance, the government will send employers the same message it is sending welfare recipients about the need to curb reliance on benefits.

Joe Hockey told The Weekend Australian that his vow to end the “age of entitlement” meant asking business to give up some of the payments and services Canberra had been giving it for years.

The government approaches Tuesday’s budget in a political fight over a tax hike on petrol and a “deficit tax” that leaves Tony ­Abbott increasingly exposed to charges of breaching his election promises.

Bill Shorten said the plan to lift fuel excise was not only a breach of faith with voters but also a hit to ­ordinary families.

“We know two things about Tony Abbott’s petrol tax: it’s a broken promise, and it’s going to put more pressure on the cost of living of all Australians who have to fill up their car every week,” the Opposition Leader said. Read more »

The Key to defeat

Luke Malpass at The Spectator has an interesting article on how it is that John Key will be defeated…and ironically John Key’s decision to only provide a lacklustre opposition to MMP may bite him.

John Key is the most popular leader in the western world. Not by a little, but a lot. His net approval rating (approvals minus disapprovals) has consistently been around 50+ per cent. That compares with Tony Abbott at 10+ per cent and Bill Shorten at 8+ per cent. Julia Gillard was somewhere down in the -20 territory. Barack Obama and David Cameron are both around -10 per cent. So why on earth will Mr Key and his government struggle to get re-elected on 20 September? The answer is simple: Mixed Member Proportional.

This electoral system, reconfirmed at the 2011 general election, is a blight on New Zealand politics. In the same way the Hare-Clark system in Tasmania delivered the recent Mickey-mouse, tail-wagging-dog government, so MMP does in New Zealand. It entrenches minority government at the expense of stability and introduces obfuscation where accountability should reside.

The left wing is an assortment of average to failing parties of little support, but group them together and the most popular government and PM in modern history may well lose…beaten by a coalition of losers.

In theory, according to its advocates, MMP is great. As it is extremely difficult to get a majority of the primary vote (1950 was the last time it happened) there can be no ‘elective dictatorships’. Because you vote for an electorate and a party, you can split your vote and elect a local candidate you like, without necessarily voting for their party. Party lists allow highly competent people with little political appeal to be elected. Parties have to constructively get along, and no government can get too far ahead of the people.   Read more »

The toxicity of the Greens and lessons from Tasmania for Labour

Labour faces a dilemma.

They can’t win the election without some sort of formal accommodation with the Greens. They also can’t win without Winston Peters.

And thus their dilemma is apparent. The Greens are toxic. David Cunliffe knows it, Shane Jones knows it, Winston Peters knows it.

But the problem is Moira Coatsworth is shrieking at Cunliffe that the attitude tot eh Greens must end, that they are the preferred coalition partner and that Labour needs to be nicer.

Russel Norman is exerting pressure behind the scenes as well.  But the fact remains that the Greens are toxic in any support or coalition deal.

This is a position that Tasmanian’s saw only too well and punished both Labor and the Greens over in their state elections last weekend.

Labor and the Greens have blamed each other for the loss of votes in Saturday’s Tasmanian state election, while the South Australian Liberals insisted electoral boundaries prevented them from claiming a “deserved” outright win.

The simultaneous state elections resulted in a decisive Liberal win in Tasmania and a likely hung parliament in South Australia, where the focus is now turning to negotiations with two independents.

The Liberals have raised questions over the South Australian electoral system given the party could miss out on forming government despite securing about 53% of the two-party vote.  Read more »

Australians don’t like bludging car making ratbags

The latest polls in Australia deliver bad news for the unions and for Labour.

It is clear that Australians don’t like bludging car making ratbags.

”The government has started taking some big decisions, some hard decisions, that people notice,” notably to refuse public subsidies to SPC Ardmona and the car manufacturers. ”There’s just more of a consistency to what they are doing and saying and that’s coming from the Treasurer, which he pithily summarised as ‘the end of the age of entitlement’.”

A poll by Essential Media last week found that only 36 per cent of voters approved of continuing government subsidies to the car sector, with 47 per cent opposed.

So it may be that Joe Hockey is the one winning kudos for the government.  Read more »