Bill Shorten

Comment of the Day

We have been asking a series of questions about Andrew Little and his time at the EPMU.

The main stream media have not done the deep digging into his past, even though they have to be watching what is happening in Australia with ALP leader and former head of the Australian Workers’ Union, Bill Shorten, getting questioned seriously about his unions finances.

Hakaru made this valid comment.

Can anyone enlighten me in what the Training Foundation does and are their financials available for public perusal. It would be interesting to see where 6 million went and who benefited from the “training”.   Read more »

Will the MSM ever look into Andrew Little’s Record?

My numbers are rising I tell you

The current problems facing ALP leader Bill Shorten over irregular payments to his union are the subject of a Royal Commission. They are also subject to serious scrutiny by serious Australian journalists.

In New Zealand this has not happened as our incredibly shallow press have concentrated on pulling of pony tails and other trivial things. They have done a light once-over of Andrew Little, and tried to make him seem human.

They have not taken a deep and thorough look into his background at the EPMU and the financial irregularities that need questioning.

Andrew Little makes strong claims about his stewardship of the EPMU, yet there are clear and very public inconsistencies in the EPMU accounts. All this is available on the public record, yet none of our ambulance-chasing journalists have been willing to do the kind of deep research required to make a story stack up, or to ask Andrew Little questions about his union’s accounts.   Read more »

Brutal editorial in SMH on Shorten

The Sydney Morning Herald editorial is brutal on ALP leader Bill Shorten.

The position of Bill Shorten as federal Labor leader is becoming untenable. The latest revelations of his union past published by Fairfax Media on Wednesday afternoon raise further doubts and questions about his suitability as alternative prime minister.

Mr Shorten should respond to the questions immediately, in full, rather than wait until he fronts the royal commission into trade union corruption in late August.

The Opposition Leader should also reflect on the damage his continued leadership is doing to Labor, and as such to the interests of the people he claims to represent.

As long as the Australian Workers Union stain lingers and/or grows, Labor cannot hope to win an election next September, let alone a snap poll that Prime Minister Tony Abbott may well call to capitalise on the Shorten malaise.

Last week Fairfax Media identified tens of millions of dollars of largely unexplained employer payments to the AWU’s Victorian branch from January 2004 to late 2007. Mr Shorten was state secretary from 1998 and federal secretary from 2001 to 2007.

Mr Shorten called the reports “an unfair smear”. They were not. They reflected legitimate investigations into a man asking voters to trust him.

The latest revelations are even more damning.

The fine print in documents lodged with the Australian Electoral Commission and AWU bank records show the giant builder Thiess John Holland paid Mr Shorten’s union nearly $300,000 after he struck a landmark workplace deal that saved the company as much as $100 million on the Melbourne Eastlink tollway project.

The deal was hugely favourable to the employer, just like other deals struck by the AWU during Mr Shorten’s reign. Some deals involved payments to the AWU, or the payment of member’s dues. The AWU struck agreements with companies when it suited the union’s political purpose, which was to bolster membership. This allowed the AWU to assert its dominance over rival unions and bolster the power of its leaders in the Labor party’s corrupted, undemocratic structure.

Mr Shorten has described as completely unfair and false any implications that he is not completely motivated and committed to getting a better deal for workers, for productive relations at companies and for standing up for people.

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How long has Bill Shorten got?

Julia Gillard was told to never trust Bill Shorten…she did and he stabbed her.

He also stabbed Kevin Rudd.

Now it looks like it is his turn to cop a stabbing. It was pretty bad that Tanya Plibersek looks like she set him up on the boat people saga yesterday but the real killer for Shorten is the unfolding corruption and bribery scandal yet again engulfing the union movement and the ALP.

Bill Shorten’s factional ally Cesar Melhem made a $2000 donation through his Industry 2020 slush fund to the ALP leader’s campaign to keep the seat of Maribyrnong on June 30, 2009.

Another political ally of Mr Shorten and Mr Melhem in the Victorian Right’s Labor Unity faction, federal member for McEwen Rob Mitchell, received a $5000 donation on May 19, 2010, from the same slush fund.

Mr Shorten was, after receiving that $2000 donation in 2009, the star attraction at two fundraisers for the Industry 2020 fund in 2011 and again in 2012 while serving as a senior minister in the Gillard government.   Read more »

Ratbag union bosses still be hauled before corruption commission in Australia

The Royal Commission looking into union and, by implication ALP corruption is continuing. Now federal opposition leader Bill Shorten is having to front.

Federal Labor leader Bill Shorten will appear before the royal commission into union corruption as a scandal deepens around the conduct of his former union.

Mr Shorten, a former Victorian and national Australian Workers Union secretary, announced he will testify before the inquiry in either late August or early September after being requested to do so on Thursday night.

The commission’s request comes after Fairfax Media reported on Thursday that Mr Shorten oversaw an unusual deal in which a Melbourne building firm bankrolled the union dues of its own employees through large payments to the AWU.

Receipts and emails revealed show Mr Shorten oversaw the deal in 2005 whereby his AWU branch invoiced Winslow Constructors for $38,228 to pay fo 105 union memberships.

“I welcome the opportunity to talk about my 21 year record standing up for workers,” Mr Shorten said.   Read more »

This is what happens when you bash wogs, abos, and boat people

Tony Abbott has had a dramatic turn around in the polls after he launched into wogs, abos, boat people and bludgers.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has made up ground against Opposition Leader Bill Shorten but Labor continues to be ahead of the Coalition ahead of the next week’s critical federal budget.

A Newspoll, published by The Australian on Tuesday, shows Mr Abbott and Mr Shorten are now equally preferred PM by 38 per cent of voters each.

This is a large improvement for Mr Abbott who trailed Mr Shorten by 11 points in March.   Read more »

Who should we blame for Islamic Terror coming to our shores?

Andrew Bolt says it is the politicians fault, more specifically those politicians who were responsible “through years of reckless immigration and refugee policies.

I ACCUSE Australia’s political class of a crime. Of wilfully ­endangering the safety of ­Australians.

They — with much media help — have put Australians in danger through years of reckless immigration and refugee policies.

And it’s come to what we saw on Saturday — anti-terrorism police in Melbourne ­arresting five more young men from Muslim families, two for allegedly plotting attacks on police on Anzac Day.

These men were allegedly associates of Numan Haider, an Afghan refugee and Islamic State supporter who last year stabbed two Victorian policemen before being shot dead.

Police have been typically coy about identifying exactly which “community” the five were from, refusing in two press conferences on Saturday to even mention the words “Islam” or “Muslim”.

But their use of the word “community” made clear they meant something other than the Australian one.

The fact is we have imported people from “communities” so at odds with our own that a minority of members has declared war on our institutions, our police and even — allegedly — Anzac Day, the most potent symbol of our nationhood.

We are going to have the same problem here in New Zealand, with years of the Clark administration pandering to Islamic refugees.

[T]he hard facts remain. Of the 21 Australians jailed for terrorism offences so far this century, all were Muslim. Most were born overseas. Most of the rest are children of immigrants from Muslim countries.

Add the following: some 150 Australian Muslims have enlisted with barbaric terrorist groups of the Middle East, ­notably Islamic State.

Another 100 Australians thought likely to join them have had their passports confiscated, and some 200 have been pulled off planes.

Meanwhile ASIO is investigating 400 other cases involving Islamist threats.

This is an astonishing harvest of danger from a Muslim community here of fewer than 500,000 people.

Compare: we have more than 400,000 Buddhists, yet not one Buddhist has been convicted here of terrorism ­offences or shot a hostage in a Sydney cafe in the name of their faith.

There is undeniably something different about Islam, or at least the way many interpret it.

New Zealand needs to halt Islamic immigration, and possibly seek to reverse it.

So who is to blame for this problem in Australia? Bolt blames liberal elites.

[W]ith the dangers now so obvious, it’s time to call out those who so blindly exposed us to them.

There is Malcolm Fraser, the Liberal prime minister who ignored official warnings in 1976 that many refugees he was taking in from the Lebanese civil war were unskilled, illiterate and “of questionable character’’, meaning ‘’the conflicts, tensions and divisions within Lebanon will be transferred to Australia’’. Too true.

There’s Paul Keating, who, before becoming another high-immigration prime minister, overturned the Hawke government’s decision to deny permanent residency to Grand Mufti Taj Din al-Hilali, a hate preacher who went on to call the September 11 terror attacks “God’s work against oppressors”.

There’s Kevin Rudd, who as prime minister scrapped our tough border laws, opening the doors to 50,000 illegal boat people.

There is Rudd again, who, when warned by Liberal MP Wilson Tuckey that among the many peaceful boat people could be a terrorist or two, damned Tuckey to media applause for “divisive and disgusting remarks”.

There’s current Labor leader Bill Shorten, who still opposes the Abbott Government’s successful border policies and last year suggested we repeat Fraser’s mistake in response to wars in Iraq and Syria: “Perhaps it’s time to discuss do we take more refugees from these countries.”

And there’s even Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Yes, Abbott has stopped the boats, but even he still pandered to radical Muslim “representatives” he should have shunned, for instance consulting the Islamic Friendship Association’s Keysar Trad, described by the NSW Supreme Court as a “dangerous and disgraceful individual” who “incites people to commit acts of violence”.

Even Abbott cops it. And then the media…

Disturbingly, much of the media has gone alone with this great denial.

SBS notoriously refused to screen video it shot just days before the September 11 ­attacks which showed our Mufti Hilali praising suicide bombers as “heroes”.

And “human rights” lawyer and writer Julian Burnside this year claimed “the Islamophobia stirred up by Abbott and Bolt is a bigger threat to us than terrorism”.

This denial most stop.

Our refugee intake must be stricter, taking fewer people from cultures likely to clash with our own.

And we must be slower to shut down debates with screams of “racist”.

If you fear racists, then fear the ugly fallout if police one day fail to stop an Anzac Day plot by people that more prudent politicians would have kept out.

Our politicians are pretty squeamish, they need to remember that they are there to represent us, not pander to offshore moaners.

 

– Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun

 

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Shanking a union boss with his own stupidty

I love Australian politics, it is as brutal as it is beautiful. There are no sooks and they play for keeps.

A union boss has recently tried to rinse a Labor party veteran out of the party because he dared to support privatisation in New South Wales.

He got all the other affiliated unions to line up behind him in the move, and then he got shanked in a beautiful piece of skullduggery using his own stupidity.

The union official who began a push to expel Labor veteran Martin Ferguson from the ALP for his views on privatisation believes the official story of how the Twin Towers in New York were brought down on September 11, 2001 is a conspiracy that does not stand up to scientific scrutiny.

Maritime Union of Australia official Kevin Bracken last week moved a motion condemning Mr Ferguson for publicly supporting power privatisation in New South Wales during the recent state election and urging the Victorian branch of the Labor Party to kick him out. That motion was unanimously passed by all state leaders of affiliated unions.

Mr Bracken told Fairfax Media on Wednesday that he did not resile from his views – expressed in an interview with the ABC’s Jon Faine back in 2010 – that “the official story is a conspiracy theory that doesn’t stand up to scientific scrutiny”.    Read more »

Australia, the first ever nation to win a Darwin award?

Well one columnist in Australia thinks they should win a Darwin Award for being dumber than a sack of hammers.

I’M THINKING of setting up a national version of the Darwin Awards; you know, where they give an award to the stupidest way people manage to kill themselves each year, or, as the website puts it, “contribute to human evolution by self-selecting themselves out of the gene pool via death or sterilisation by their own actions”.

When I say “national”, I mean it literally – my Darwin Awards aren’t for people, they’re for nations. I’m going to hand out an annual prize for the dumbest, most imbecilic country on the planet that is setting out to destroy its own comfortable way of life via its own moronic actions.

I’m going to find the one nation that’s doing the equivalent of putting its head out of the train window to see if there’s a tunnel approaching.

And right now, Australia looks like being the 2014 National Darwin Award winner. Why? Because we are among the most collectively stupid people on the planet. Just look at the statistics – or rather, the opinion polls.

Apparently, a majority of us think Bill Shorten would be a better prime minister of our country than Tony Abbott.

Let me run that past you again – slowly this time, really slowly, because it’s obvious there are some pretty slow people out there: a … majority … (in other words, enough voters to win an election) … think … (i.e. have apparently used what passes for their brains and come to this conclusion) … that Bill Shorten … (a bloke who is so empty-headed he once said: “I don’t know what Julia Gillard said, but I agree with every word of it”) … would be a better prime minister … (in other words, be making every single decision every single day for three years that will determine the prosperity and financial success of every one of us and all our children) … than Tony Abbott (a bloke who, regardless of whether you like him or not, has as his sole focus a single-minded determination to fix the economic mess that this country is in).

Come again? Are we for real?

The best Darwin Awards always have a neat slice of bitter irony to them; like the guy who tries to impress his fiancee by climbing on to her balcony – on the 101st floor.

The irony with our National Darwin winner – Australia – is that the very bloke Australians want as their next prime minister was part of the team that got us into our financial mess in the first place.

Worse, Shorten is either so dumb or so devious that he is now opposing the very same $5 billion worth of cuts to spending that he supported when he was in government.

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Australian Labor Party leader Bill Shorten headlines Labour Congress

It’s a pretty sad sign that you have to get an Aussie to come be your headline act at your own Congress.

Australia’s Labor Party leader Bill Shorten said he believes further improvements can be made to the rights of New Zealanders living in Australia, but stopped short of making any specific commitments.

Mr Shorten and Labour leader David Cunliffe held talks yesterday after Mr Shorten travelled over to speak at the Labour Party’s election year Congress today.

It is believed to be the first time the leader of Australia’s Labor Party has addressed its New Zealand counterpart’s annual conference.

Mr Shorten said he and Mr Cunliffe had discussed the long-standing issue of New Zealanders being denied benefits such as social security assistance in Australia, while Australians did qualify for those measures here.

“We do believe we could do more work to investigate what further improvements could be made to make the lives of New Zealanders living in Australia, and Australians living in New Zealand easier.

There’s nothing specific in terms of making a commitment today, but I recognise Australia benefits from the contribution of permanent residents born in New Zealand and we should make sure where there are bureaucratic red tape problems that we work together to eliminate them in the best interests of both our people.”

Shorten and Cunliffe make a good pair.  Hot air to fill empty promises are their trademark.  Read more »