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Franks on engaging social media

Stephen Franks has written a LONG (but very considered) piece on why not only should lawyers not be afraid from engaging with social media, but arguably they are ethically obliged to, where using effective channels to get a message out there is in the interest of a client.
It’s a bit of a read, but for anyone interested in the media, politics and the law, it is an essential read.

A public voice for clients, and for views of what the law should be, does not shun effective platforms.

We have in the past, do now, and will in the future, write, publish, talk about and promote causes and interests in any medium that seems to us likely to be effective. Of course that includes social media. I have my own blog. I comment on the blog posts of others. Frequently the participation is on issues where I or the firm have a view, and our participation is a pro bono attempt to add expert correction or advice to the public discussion. Sometimes participation promotes the firm. Sometimes it is expressly to advance a client’s cause.

Like most people, we are probably more effective and more energetic on issues where our views coincide with those of the client. With their approval we’ll use as many channels as is practicable to ensure that the client position is communicated to the people who should have the information. We are public advocates. We do not eschew any lawful form of communication.

He then turns to the irony of the NBR reporting asking about using a media resource that calls on accountability and causes some offence. ¬† ¬† Read more »

Interesting ODT article

There was an interesting ODT article yesterday that quoted Julian Miles QC.

Ironically he represented Fairfax, I think, in opposition to my application for an injunction. He is one of the most qualified barristers in the land, especially in areas of defamation and also media law.

When he speaks people should listen.

A lawyer who prevented Cameron Slater from gagging traditional media says he expects the controversial Whale Oil blogger will soon enjoy the same legal protection as journalists.

Julian Miles QC represented three media organisations at a hearing in the High Court at Auckland on Friday and less than 24 hours later spoke at the World Bar Conference in Queenstown.

Mr Slater had sought an injunction stopping further publication of private emails hacked from his computer.

The emails have caused a storm of controversy during the past three weeks, leading to the resignation of Minister of Justice Judith Collins.

On Friday, Mr Slater won an interim injunction against ”unknown defendants” publishing his private emails – referring to the hacker known as Whaledump, or Rawshark, who obtained the information used as the basis for Nicky Hager’s controversial book, Dirty Politics. ¬†¬† Read more »

Russia passes law to make high traffic bloggers part of media

Russia has changed their law to make high traffic bloggers part of the media, forcing them to adopt the same checks and balances other media organisation adhere and are subject to.

Not sure they have got the numbers right, but I guess you have to start somewhere.

The amendments to the law On Information, Information Technology and Information Protection plus other related laws, informally referred to as the law on bloggers, have become effective on August 1, RIA Novosti writes.

The law requires individuals whose blog attracts a daily readership of more than 3,000 to take on the full responsibilities of mass media outlets. President Vladimir Putin signed the bill into law on May 6 this year.

Before the enforcement of the law, the telecommunications authority, Roskomnadzor, published a methodology for calculating the number of subscribers of personal websites and social networking pages. Personal bloggers will be rated by the number of unique visitors and session duration (full loading estimated at no less than 15 seconds).¬† Read more »

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Compare and contrast

It is interesting to compare articles by different media on the same topic.

A case in point was yesterday when they were reporting on Cam in the High Court.

First up lets check out the headlines.

Blogger wants journalists’ privileges
-Stuff.co.nz –

Blogger argues for media protection
-New Zealand Herald

Whale Oil flaunts Canon award as evidence he is a journalist
-National Business Review

Journalist/Blogger complex debated today
-Newstalk ZB

Read more »

It all started nine years ago…today

Today is the blog’s birthday…it is nine years old today.

The first post  was a photo of my desk, my phone, some keys and a knife.

Nine years on…this was the start

Things have changed somewhat…back then I was the only reader…and people wondered what I was doing wasting my time on a thing called a blog…what was that anyway?

For nine years I have lived my life in public…sometime too much in public, but that is how it goes.

This was where it has ended up so far.

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and;

Read more »

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APN buys 100% WOBH, Appoints Slater as New Media Editor

MARKET ANNOUNCEMENT

APN TO ACQUIRE 100% OF WHALE OIL BEEF HOOKED  BLOG ASSETS
– APN to move to full ownership of WOBH for $4.273 million
– Purchase price represents an a random number dreamed up by all concerned.
– APN confident in new media as a growth medium and in the ability of WOBH to continue increasing market share
РMajority of APN’s earnings post-Acquisition expected to be in growth businesses (radio, outdoor and digital)
–¬†Exclusive 10 year agreement with WOBH and editor Cam Slater secured to operate WOBH and broadcast a new blog radio show via the iHeartRadio digital radio platform in New Zealand
– APN appoints Cam Slater as New Media Editor

Overview
SYDNEY, 19 February, 2014 ‚Äď APN News & Media Limited [ASX, NZX: APN] today announced that it will acquire full ownership of Whale Oil Beef Hooked (‚ÄėWOBH‚Äô) for an enormous amount of hooter (the ‚ÄėAcquisition‚Äô). The purchase price represents a big truck load of cash beeping backwards into the loading bay of Slater’s bank.

As a result of the Acquisition, APN will own 100% of the largest and most effective news and political blog with an audience that exceeds most of the rest of their stable of newspapers. and even some of their radio assets. WOBH writes for an audience that exceeds 2.5 million page views each month. Read more »

Daniel Hannan nicely sums up MSM v Blogs

Daniel Hannan explores and explains the sometimes unhappy relationship between traditional media and blogs…from his own blog, that is ironically part of The Telegraph.

Back in the pioneering days, blogs were seen as a challenge to the established media. And, in one sense, they were. When Guido scalped his first minister, Peter Hain, in 2008, something changed, though the newspapers were slow to notice. When, the following year, he aimed his tomahawk at Derek Draper and Damien McBride, old-style pundits were still laboriously explaining to their readers what these blog thinggies were. By the time Tim Yeo became Guido’s latest victim, no one needed to ask any more.

When a dozen dead tree newspapers determined the agenda, the media‚Äôs chief power lay in¬†not¬†reporting a story ‚Äď not through conspiracy, but from shared assumptions about what constituted news. Take the leak of the ‚Äúhide the decline‚ÄĚ emails from climatologists at the University of East Anglia in late 2009. At first, the astonishing trove was reported only by bloggers. It wasn‚Äôt that environment correspondents were meeting behind drawn blinds and vowing to repress the discovery; it was that, being uncomplicated believers in the AGW orthodoxy, they couldn‚Äôt see why the emails were a story. Only when repeatedly needled by online commentators were they were eventually forced to report perhaps the biggest event in its field of the century.

The key moment came when the story was¬†picked up¬†by James Delingpole, whose post attracted 1.6 million hits. Tellingly, that post appeared here, on Telegraph Blogs. Blogs were now part of the established media. In the early days, some had believed that the MSM would be displaced, others that the old brands would conscript the upstarts. In fact, something more interesting happened:¬†the distinction broke down. ¬† Read more »

Whaleoil is mobile again

The Team at Cre8d implemented the new theme for Whaleoil late on Friday.  You may have noticed some small visual changes for the main site, but the objective was to fix the mobile view for Whaleoil.

We pretty much didn’t have much to “fix” – we needed something that worked, at all!

So try it out on your phones, tablets, iPads and phablets – it’s going to zoom along.

This is last month’s breakdown of platforms

dfg

It will be interesting if those stats change significantly now that Whaleoil does a better job of delivering mobile content.

Now that the Mobile Theme project is off the list, the next thing we need to focus on is to get the merchandising store up and running!  We have a supplier Рnext to-do is to put up a little e-shop.  Will keep you informed.

Another month gone, how did we do?

FEb14-stats

With February a short month, we still got our coveted 2 mil. ¬†Always hard with the additional public holidays, so that’s made the Team happy.

Thank you, and goodbye… to Nick. ¬†Nick Bird has been a faithful Whaleoil volunteer for well over a year, and it’s sad to have him leave us. ¬†Thank you for all your help Nick, and all the best with your studies. ¬†Whaleoil volunteers may all be doing a relatively small part every day, but add those together and it allows Cameron and I to spend more time on the meatier stuff. ¬† Read more »

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We are in the finalists

The ESET NetGuide Web Awards Finalists have been announced and we are in the finalists for Best Blog.

blogawards

So…we are competing with a travel, arts and fitness blog, a blog about cats and dogs, a blog about a wedding that hasn’t posted a single thing since October last year and a blog by a librarian with a kid.¬† Read more »