blogging

An idea and a challenge

martyn-martin

Yesterday I posted about Josh Forman and his analysis of Martyn Martin Bradbury.

Then late last night I received and email, one with an idea and a challenge:

Hey Cam,

Thanks for running my post about Bradbury ‘The Daily Poison’ on your site today. Generated somewhere around a thousand extra hits and counting.

I have to be honest, during the Dirty Politics saga at the last election I took the media line that you were a feral dog of a man to be true.

Funnily enough, since I have taken my time to read through some of your stuff, I can see that you are actually a pretty reasonable sort of character, most of the time, much like I am, most of the time.

For me, while sensationalist stuff may be exciting, I would much rather have a contest of ideas based on policy and general national direction rather than personality fights, and to do this, the centre left needs to engage with the centre right more, instead of constantly fighting off the deluded bastards the nip at our heals from their hideout slightly to the left of Leningrad.

Long term, I want to build my site to be the a centrist, though slightly left force to be reckoned, that can engage in meaningful debate with the right, instead of focusing on the small self interested groups that make a lot of noise, but represent a tiny minority of the public.

In my view, The Standard and The Daily Blog should be and be seen to be representatives of the tiny minority that they actually espouse the views of.

I would be happy to work with you to build such a blog, if doing so meant that you actually had a decent online adversary to engage with on a policy level, hailing from the left. I know it may seem like a counter intuitive suggestion, right working with left, but there isn’t enough of it in NZ and it may do us all some good.

Think about it, and get in touch if you are interested.

 

Regards,

Josh Forman

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New Zealand not the only country to struggle with blogs as media

Russia has a bill before parliament suggesting a 10,000 audience threshold at which point a blog or other “independent” (non-traditional) news source  automatically becomes eligible to be part of the “mass” (or main stream) media.

The Russian newspaper Izvestia quotes an unnamed parliamentary source as saying that the proposed legislation is part of suggested amendments to Russia’s Law on Mass Media. Izvestia’s source allegedly said that the figure of 10,000 daily visitors already has been fixed in draft proposals, but that it hadn’t yet been specified if this was a single-time threshold or a mean visitor index.

When a blogger registers for media accreditation, he or she will automatically have the obligation to observe all legal norms applied to registered news media outlets, which includes the obligation to verify information before distributing it and responsibility for the consequences caused by publications. Izvestia adds, that the bill is based legislation [on] used by Israel.

Makes sense that you can’t have a foot in both camps.  Once you apply as “media”, you are subject to all the benefits as well as all the responsibilities.

But, this has far reaching consequences

  • Would accreditation enable independent media like nsnbc international to protect its sources on equal footing with “mass” media?
  • Does accreditation imply access to press conferences, access to crime scenes, access to information that is usually reserved for “mass” media?
  • Does accreditation protect aspiring independent media from unlawful closures of their websites under false pretenses, as it happened with nsnbc international at least once within one year?
  • Does this accreditation mean that remuneration of contributors from the “sparse” advertising revenue and “almost non-existent” donations would become tax deductible?
  • Does it mean that small, independent media enjoy the same protection as mass media when someone sues them for libel?
  • Would independent newspapers, like nsnbc, be held accountable for the material of each individual blogger and his/her material?

Oddly enough, we already follow most of the responsibilities without having any of the benefits.

And if Russsia has a 10,000 daily visitor threshold in mind for a population of around 145 million, would that mean that for countries like New Zealand the threshold is going to be proportionally lower?  Using that figure NZ blogs would only require about 110 daily visitors to meet the mark.

At that point, just about any New Zealand blog would qualify for media accreditation.

But then again, under our laws, media isn’t about audience size.  It is about what you do.

The law is very clear:  publish or broadcast to the public anything of public interest that wasn’t in the public domain before.

News.

Blog. I. Am.

Andrew Sullivan collates a few comments from bloggers about why they are what they are…entitled I blog therefore I am it provides some insights into my own thoughts.

When I started, back in 2005, I created a personality, a pseudonym, a character. I did that for a number of reasons. I knew as soon as I started people would want to know who I was, and as soon as they knew that they would hurl about accusations that even as an adult I did my fathers bidding. Intellectual pygmies still hurl that about, even though Dad is essentially retired from national politics, has almost nothing to do with the National party and is 70 years old. I’m 45, but apparently my thoughts are not my own. That of course flowed onto my National party links and somehow it is dishonourable to have friends and acquaintances in the National party but perfectly acceptable if they are Green or Labour politicians, such is the hypocrisy of my opponents.

In any case I created a character, and built a wall for the inevitable public attacks. Each time an attack got through I built my walls higher. I still do this. It takes an effort to get behind my walls, to know the real Cam rather than the online character and personality that is Whaleoil. And Whaleoil the online character is not Cam the person…people confuse that, only very few know Cam the person and they are true friends. My walls remain high because letting people behind the walls lets people hurt me…and they have.

I have been morphing that though over time, as you read, and learn and develop so must you change…astute observers will have noticed that I comment and write now as Cam Slater not as Whaleoil. Not because I don’t like the brand, just that it is in constant transition. Still the haters and wreckers out there trawl through every utterance of the last 8 years and try to slam things in my face that I have said before. As I have stated repeatedly I can’t hide from my past and I leave it there as a reminder of it. Ever since I have been blogging I have tried to be an open book, not shying from my opinions, hey, at least I have opinions and am not some beige, middle of the road, fence sitting nancy.

I blog and write because I enjoy it. the day I stop enjoying it is the day that I will think about stopping. Right now I have much bigger plans  to extend what I have learned and to not stop at being number one…there are no challengers out there anymore so I must be my own challenger…rather be the best that there ever was and ever will be in what I do.

Have a read though of some other blogger’s thought…they encapsulate my own. Here is Will Wilkinson:

Every time I’ve been hacked and had to take the blog offline, it felt a little like an amputation. A blog is a sort of history of one’s mind, like a diary or a journal, but it’s public and that makes a huge difference. I think the public existence of my blog stabilizes my sense of self. The idea that the self is an “illusion” tends to be grounded on the false assumption that if the self is anything at all, it must be a stable inward personal quiddity available to introspection. But of course there is no such thing. The Zen masters are right. There is nothing in there, and the deeper you look the less you find. The self is more like a URL. It’s an address in a web of obligation and social expectation. According to my my idiosyncratic adaptionist just-so story, a self is an app of the organism “designed” to play iterated cooperative games, and we desire a sense of stable identity because a stable identity keeps us in therepeated games that pay. (Also those that don’t. The self can be a trap.) Expectation, reputation, obligation–these are what make the self coalesce, and the more locked in those expectation and obligations become, the more solid the self feels. There’s nothing wrong with blogging for money, but the terms of social exchange are queered a little by the cash nexus. A personal blog, a blog that is really your own, and not a channel of the The Daily Beast or Forbes or The Washington Post or what have you, is an iterated game with the purity of non-commercial social intercourse. The difference between hanging out and getting paid to hang out. Anyway, in old-school blogging, you put things out there, broadcast bits of your mind. You just give it away and in return maybe you get some attention, which is nice, and some gratitude, which is even nicer. The real return, though, is in the conclusions people draw about you based on what you have said, about what what you have said says about you, about what it means relative to what you used to say. People form expectations about you. They start to imagine a character of you, start to write a little story about you. Some of this is validating, some is irritating, and some is downright hateful. In any case it all contributes to self-definition, helps the blogger locate and comprehend himself as a node in the social world. We all lost something when the first-gen blogs and bloggers got bought up. Or, at any rate, those bloggers lost something. I’m proud of us all, but there’s also something ruinous about our success, such as it is.  Read more »

Right you lot, time for some navel gazing

A Whaleoil reader, we’ll call Paul, writes

I am a Subscriber to your Blog, and as such I appreciate your comments, fact finding and your opinions.

The whole issue is well put together and informative and sometimes fun to read.

However, increasingly I find that I am offended by the silly comments and messages left by some of the readers….most of whom seem to have personal opinions, but are often expressed in an offensive and childish manner.

I really feel that they detract from your publication.

Have you ever thought about “reining them in a little” as it were?   Read more »

Want to be a better Whaleoil commenter next year?

Then consider taking this easy 3-book course:

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Claim your life back

Steve Deane at the NZ Herald has figured out a way to combat the Rise of Whaloil – stop looking at your phone

Former Air Force reservist Demelza Challies, of Auckland, used to sleep with a notebook by her bed so she could write down ideas about how to do her job better in the middle of the night.

A solo mother who was also studying for a business degree, Ms Challies never watched TV and hadn’t read a novel in over two years. “I’d never really switch off,” she said.

With resources increasingly stretched by the move towards civilianisation, Air Force employees would take it on themselves to devote more of their lives to work, she said.

The job, which involved supplying Hercules aircraft, became a “never-ending thing”.

“We didn’t want it to be us who was the breaking point so everybody would just keep doing as much as they could.”

Eventually it became too much and she quit the Air Force to take up fulltime study, but she still had trouble letting go.

I personally find it great – have can fit all sorts of small tasks into nooks and crannies that used to go to waste, and you’re switching from work to play without even noticing.

So if you find yourself chained to your iPad, smartphone or tablet, don’t turn it off, don’t walk away – come see what’s new on Whaleoil :)

Are Fairfax going down the toilet like the Herald now?

One thing you could say for Fairfax over the last year is that they made less errors than the NZ Herald.

That may not last.

In a cost cutting exercise to chase more shareholder value, they’re dressing this up as a mere matter of training

via Twitter

via Twitter

One of Fairfax’s editors, says

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What do my enemies say?

Mostly I don’t care what my political and media enemies say… but sometimes some of them display some smarts…and that is useful to look at.

This is not an article on the morality of Auckland Mayor Len Brown, his mistress Bevan Chuang, or blogger Cameron Slater. The public deserved to know about Len Brown’s affair insofar as it affected his professional life and whether he resigns depends on public opinion. This is about the blog and future of scandal.

Even before watching Firstline yesterday, I thought Cameron Slater was a garbage person; the interview simply confirmed it. I consider his Whale Oil Beef Hooked blog as a political and moral cesspool. But the interview also confirmed my opinion of Slater as cunning, shrewd, calculating, and excellent at his job. He came across self-assured and communicated his case well – whether or not he’s being straight.

Whale Oil is the most read blog in New Zealand because Slater has the smarts, the connections, and understands politics, the media and the power of the blog. His father John Slater was former President of the National Party under Jenny Shipley, grew up in a household regularly visited by MPs and cabinet ministers, and is connected to well known former National Party advisors and right wing pundits Matthew Hooton and David Farrar and certainly connected to other journalists. He’s attained pundit status as a regular commentator on TV3′s Saturday morning current affairs show The Nation and the morning show Firstline. He has an excellent understanding of politics and become synonymous with distributing leaks such as leaking the names of convicted celebrities with name suppression and breaching the golden media rule – albeit selectively – of addressing allegations of adultery against MPs.    Read more »

Should readers pay for the personal bills of a blogger?

via plawiuk

via plawiuk

I note that Russell Brown of Public Address has put the begging bowl out.  Now that he has no regular income but continues to receive regular bills, he’s “rediscovered” that blogging is quite enjoyable, and could people please consider funding him while he’s looking for some more regular income?

At which point, people that paid him to blog, will lose him again as he’s off bringing home the bacon and blogging goes back to a sideline interest that was begotten from his weekly Hard News commitment, and personally hasn’t really gone much beyond that over the years.

But yes.  Blogging is fun, and is extremely rewarding in non-financial terms.   Read more »

Tagged:

Nate Silver leaves NY Times, takes his blog to ESPN

This is big news. Nate Silver has packed up his blog at NY Times and moved to ESPN. His traffic will go with him. That is the nature of blogs where personalities are followed not mastheads.

Nate Silver, famous for his eerily accurate election predictions, is dumping the Gray Lady for the network of Keith Olbermann. The math wizard is taking his FiveThirtyEight blog — which was a must-read during the 2012 presidential election — and jumping ship to ESPN, reports his former co-worker Brian Stelter in The Times. Silver will now write and crunch numbers for the sports network while also “most likely” contributing to Keith Olbermann’s new show, according to theTimes report. In what is a classic Times-ian understatement,  Stelter writes, “[Silver's] departure will most likely be interpreted as a blow to the company.”

To which one might say: ya think?   Read more »