Bob Jones

Bob Jones on the living wage

Yesterday Bob Jones gave his considered opinion on the living wage.

He has spent some considerable time talking to retailers about costs in their businesses, which led him to a discussion on wages and staffing:

My inquiry as to the best employees brought an unsurprising answer – new immigrants by a country mile. What particularly interested me was the salaries for what’s essentially menial work. In most cases they’re on the minimum wage. Any more and they’re out of business, he said, and I believe him.

I mention all of this in the context of the absurdly titled living wage clamour, the noise invariably coming from leftish critics not employing anyone, nor ever likely to. There are exceptions. Two leftie Wellington city councillors, respective owners of small city retail food businesses, led the charge recently for menial task council employees to be paid the so-called living wage. Inquiry however, revealed their own employees were on the minimum wage.

“We’d go broke,” they wailed when their hypocrisy was exposed. It was classic left do as I say, not as I do, double standards. Everyone benefits from a high wage economy as it increases spending power and thus the economy. But it also necessarily increases prices which no one wants to meet, thus shop assistants are the lowest paid sector in the work force, despite being one of the largest. ¬† Read more »

Bob Jones has the solution for cheaper houses

Bob Jones has a brilliant solution for solving housing affordability and the supposed housing crisis.

I have a solution which may induce initial antagonism, but viewed calmly, it’s perfectly logical. National’s policy of providing more cash for first-home buyers is certainly not addressing Auckland’s problem. Instead it will heighten it by increasing demand, although outside of Christchurch it will have merit in assisting first-home seekers.

Recently, we legislated that our worker standards must apply to foreign trawlers fishing our waters. On face value that appeared virtuous. In fact, it’s utterly hypocritical.

Our living standards rely on incredibly cheap goods from Asia. They’re cheap thanks to low labour costs, as on the foreign fishing boats. So to be consistent, why not impose the same fishing boat rules to imported goods? There are two answers.

First, in terms of moral inconsistency, it’s analogous to the abortion debate. What can’t be seen, namely Chinese factories and unborn babies, conveniently doesn’t count.

The second excellent reason is that free trade is unquestionably mutually beneficial, and as with Japan and increasingly Korea, in a few years, fast-rising Chinese living standards will see this low labour cost manufacturing continue its westward move to Southeast Asia, then the Indian sub-continent, and if robots haven’t by then killed off menial jobs as inevitably they will, then on to Africa. Everyone’s a winner.

Actually, minimum standards are imposed by America, albeit not the same as Western equivalents. A few years ago I met a young American woman in Bolivia who was taking a break from her job as an inspector overseeing Caribbean factory and labour standards.

If they weren’t up to scratch she could block their exports to the US. Her concerns were wages and working conditions. America has similar inspectors in Asia following a public clamour after revelation of some Chinese factories’ then appalling standards.

So accepting that low Asian labour costs are mutually beneficial, the answer to attaining a mass supply of housing in one fell swoop, is to emulate Dubai and, as a one-off exercise, import an army of cheap sub-continent labour. Dubains reject manual work, aside from which they’re too small in population to achieve what they have without outside help.

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Labour voter Bob Jones on Labour’s fortunes

Bob never sugarcoats

Two months ago I wrote that the election was done and dusted and that Cunliffe, the most disliked political leader in this country’s history, loathed by his caucus but foisted on them by extremist elements controlling the party, was leading Labour into a terrible disaster.

I suggested caucus should change the leader then and there if they were to save their party from a catastrophic outcome. That produced a flood of bitter abuse from their nasty bloggers, cowardly hiding behind pseudonyms, accusing me of being a die-hard National voter.

I last voted National in 1981 but did so this time with gusto, although giving Trevor Mallard my candidate vote.

Serial apologiser Cunliffe should put aside his sorrow at being a man and do the manly thing, namely apologise to his battered party and resign, as convention demands.

But behaving honourably was alien to Cunliffe who instead blamed the Hager sneak and Dotcom for distracting voters, ignoring the fact that he happily endorsed their nonsense at the time, plus their efforts plainly didn’t distract National voters.

Both Dotcom and Hager would be deified by the left had their plan actually worked out. ¬† It might have, had they not overegged the pudding so much. ¬† Read more »

Bob Jones normally votes Labour. Not this time

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Interesting

When I wrote recently that this election was done and dusted, a storm of protest erupted on the New Zealand Herald’s website from Labour’s deeply unattractive, rabid tribalists. Abuse aside, the common theme was that I’m a die-hard National supporter. That gave great amusement given that I last voted National in 1981.

Excepting twice Act and the New Zealand Party in 1984, I’ve voted Labour ever since. Policies, not parties are my guide. But while I’ve given financial support to Labour MP friends, I certainly don’t want to see a change of government.

Aside from other disturbing considerations, a Labour government is currently only possible by incorporating the most abysmal line-up of no-hopers ever to have presented themselves in our history.

The Nats’ rowing boat television advertisement is spot-on, consequently this time National will get my Party vote, although I’ll opt for the Labour seat incumbent.

Staunch Labour voter Bob Jones can’t stomach the idea of a Labour/Green/Mana/Internet/NZ First government either. ¬†And who can blame him? ¬†If he votes on policy, and he’s being truthful about that, then what on earth does anyone think they are voting for? ¬† Nobody knows which policies will be left standing after coalition agreements are signed.

He then gets stuck into Colin Craig ¬† Read more »

Bob Jones on the demise of NZ First

I’ll spare you the detailed description on Barry Soper and Audrey Young’s mandatory buttock grabbing (you can read that here, if you really want), ¬†instead, picking up the story here:

I never thought anything could top Laila Harre’s 2002 defeat explanation with her “unfortunately the public voted with their heads”, but, by God, there’s been some serious challenges – notably from Laila herself.

Even the most hardened hacks were dumbstruck by her protest at allowing her boss into the country. But she was immediately trumped by Kim Dotcom himself, who agreed it was an outrage. If he feels that strongly then America – where he’s destined to end up anyway – will give him a big hello, plus free accommodation for a very long time, although decidedly smaller than his current abode.

Colin Craig continues to delight. Explaining away his nutty image, he instead cemented it by saying: “It was logical to platform off the rhetoric already being discussed.” Psychiatrists are banned from entering, but there’s a trip to Upper Volta for anyone making sense of that.

Having lost female voters after declaring New Zealand women promiscuous, Colin is now targeting homosexuals by an advertising campaign showing him lying in long grass with a come-hither look. Missing is a rose stem between his teeth.

To add to the madness, Labour’s normally sane Andrew Little, jealous of Trevor Mallard’s moa headlines, declared men charged with sex crimes will be automatically guilty unless they can prove their innocence.

Then to further alienate male voters, Labour’s serial apologiser leader chimed in, unbelievably apologising for being a man.

If you were writing a script, you’f be going: ¬†“no, too much, it’s starting to get to the point nobody would believe this could actually happen”. ¬†And yet… the current farce isn’t over yet!
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Bob Jones… on Bob Jones

Love him or hate him, he’s national treasure icon.

5. What kind of father are you?

Not a conventional one.

I’m not going to watch them play football and go to school plays and that.

I didn’t want my parents to do that, not that they ever did.

Dad did watch me box once.

Thankfully I won.

No, I won’t tell you how many I’ve got.

Millions of daughters. Read more »

Never interrupt a man who is fishing

Yesterday was 29 years since Bob Jones snotted an impertinent Rod Vaughan for disturbing his fishing.

In July 1985 New Zealand Party leader Bob Jones and president Malcolm McDonald surprised many by announcing the nation’s then-third most popular party was taking an 18 month recess. TVNZ went searching for comment, and after chartering a helicopter, found Jones fishing near Turangi. Jones was not amused; he infamously punched reporter Rod Vaughan, arguing later he would fight any charges in court, since the journalists had subjected him to intolerable harassment. When fined $1000, Jones asked the judge if he paid $2000, could he please do it again?

Eyewitness News - Bob Jones punches reporter Rod Vaughan

Every proper bloke would have cheered Bob Jones on for bashing Rod Vaughan…damn impertinent interrupting a man while he was fishing. ¬†¬† Read more »

Bob Jones on Mr Omnishambles

It’s like shooting fish in a barrel now. ¬†But let’s enjoy.

I dislike third-term governments, as invariably they become arrogant, but we’re going to get one – and thank God, given the alternative. The absurd amalgam of Labour, the Greens, Harawira and possibly Harre and Winston is simply unfit to rule.

Failing a dramatic polling change, Labour will be decimated in this election – extraordinary given it should have been a shoo-in.

Labour’s problems directly reflect its management structure, to cite Labour MP Damien O’Connor, in allowing the party to be captured by a “gaggle of gays and unionists”. These factions control both candidate and leadership selection and have installed a discredited left-wing agenda, contrary to most of their senior MPs’ sentiments.

No Labour leader has ever been so unpopular as David Cunliffe, evidenced by the disastrous polls and also the Reader’s Digest trustworthy survey bracketing him humiliatingly in bottom place with Dotcom and Harawira. Cunliffe was installed against the strong wishes of those who knew him best, namely Labour’s caucus, and now the public know him as well, resulting in a wider disdain.

Cunliffe is a dead man walking; on political life support; a target to take all the flak. ¬† Read more »

The Secret Diaries of Comrade Simon, Ctd

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Terrible weekend, had to spend it with a bunch of bloody tories in the town hall in Wellington.

The only intelligent discussions I had all weekend were with the cleaning staff and the dustman on the streets when I was out for my early morning run. Nats says that all those Bellamys pies are showing on the middle. Little does she know that those are union approved pies.

Some old duck came up to me and told me I reminded her of Winston in his younger days. Silly old cow didn‚Äôt recognise I am much, much taller than Winston. And better looking. And that old bastard Bob Jones has been having a go at me for not speaking properly.¬† Read more »

Dangle money before hardened lefties and they’ll sit up and purr every time

Bob Jones is on fire in today’s Herald column

Dotcom’s loveable maverick reputation collapsed, despite his vigorous legal efforts to prevent it, once details of the FBI’s claim became public. Hitherto he had presented his business as that of an innocent bystander, akin to a taxi driver delivering a passenger to a bank, then subsequently being charged with aiding and abetting a crime after it was found his fare had robbed the bank.

But the FBI claims he had the means to control his Megaupload site’s content, but far from doing so, actively incentivised the placement of movies on his site.

In rebuttal, Dotcom points to the terms service users were obliged to agree to, which included an undertaking not to post copyrighted material. He further argues that the sheer volume of material was such as to prevent practical policing.

The user copyright undertaking won’t wash in any court and he knows it. It was his primary income source, arising from many tens of thousands of downloading users exploiting his site’s stolen movies, but Dotcom, the site owner, implausibly claims this was all unknown to him.

Anyone wrongly charged with a serious crime should be ultra-eager to get into a court and argue their innocence. Instead, Dotcom has wasted millions trying to avoid doing so.

Nobody will give him a fair trial. ¬†He doesn’t expect them in New Zealand and he doesn’t expect them in the USA. ¬†In the mean time, the July 7 extradition hearing is moving nearer. ¬† Read more »