Brazil

Will Zika kill the Olympics? Can it be moved?

Could the Olympics be in trouble because of the Zika virus?

The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has told sports federations that athletes and staff concerned for their health over the Zika virus should consider not going to the Olympic Games in August in Rio de Janeiro.

The message was delivered in a conference call involving USOC officials and leaders of US sport federations in late January, according to two people who participated in the hook-up.

Federations were told no one should go to Brazil “if they don’t feel comfortable going — bottom line”, said Donald Anthony, president and board chairman of USA Fencing.

The USOC’s briefing to sport federations is the latest sign Olympics officials are taking the Zika threat to the Rio Games seriously, and acknowledges at least some athletes and support staff could face a tough decision over whether to attend.   Read more »

Zika turning into a bit of a debacle – you can’t even kiss now

The Zika virus is sounding pretty nasty, and now kissing is off the agenda.

Scientists identified the Zika virus in the saliva and urine of two infected patients, a top Brazilian biomedical research institution said on Friday, prompting its president to urge pregnant women not to kiss strangers just as local carnival celebrations begin.

The discovery added to the rising concern over Zika, which is spreading rapidly in the Americans and has been linked to thousands of severe birth defects in Brazil.

They said they used genetic testing to identify the virus in saliva and urine samples from two patients who had symptoms caused by Zika infection, and determined that the virus was active, meaning it had the potential to cause infection, scientists at the public Oswaldo Cruz Foundation said.

They said more research was needed to determine whether Zika could be transmitted by either fluid.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Brasil, São Paulo, SP. 14/02/1958. Crédito:ARQUIVO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO/AE/Codigo imagem:53554 The Honorable Ms. Rhino.

Brasil, São Paulo, SP. 14/02/1958. Crédito:ARQUIVO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO/AE/Codigo imagem:53554
The Honorable Ms. Rhino.

The Honorable Ms. Rhino

Cacareco, a rhinoceros at the São Paulo zoo, was a candidate for the 1958 city council elections with the intention of protesting against political corruption.

The city council election in Sao Paulo, Brazil had a surprise winner — Cacareco, a five-year-old female rhinoceros at the local zoo. Not only did she win, but she did so by a landslide, garnering 100,000 votes (15% of the total). This was one of the highest totals for a local candidate in Brazil’s history to that date.

Cacareco’s candidacy was traced back to a group of students who had printed up 200,000 ballots with her name on them, but the ballots were all legitimately cast by voters, one of whom commented: “Better to elect a rhino than an ass.”

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Photo Of The Day

Photo Credito: Reprodução

Photo Credito: Reprodução

Prison Breakout in Brazil

After Guards Fall For Fake ‘Orgy’ Plan

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Photo Of The Day

Image: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters A worker is seen inside the Cuncas II tunnel that will link the canals being built to divert water from the Sao Francisco river for use in four drought-plagued states, a project that is three years behind schedule and has doubled in cost from the original estimate of $3.4 billion, near the city of Mauriti, Ceara state, Brazil, Jan. 28, 2014.

Image: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters
A worker is seen inside the Cuncas II tunnel that will link the canals being built to divert water from the Sao Francisco river for use in four drought-plagued states, a project that is three years behind schedule and has doubled in cost from the original estimate of $3.4 billion, near the city of Mauriti, Ceara state, Brazil, Jan. 28, 2014.

Darkness at the End of Brazil’s Great Water Tunnel

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Bugger, another global warming catastrophe claim busted

It looks like, contrary to the alarmists views, that global warming is actually helping wheat production, not hindering it.

Forbes reports:

Global wheat production set new records in 2013 and 2014, contradicting alarmists’ claims that global warming is reducing wheat harvests.

Global warming alarmists and their lapdog media allies decided Christmas Week 2014 should be filled with claims that global warming is crushing wheat production. Grist, Reuters, the UKGuardian, and the Columbus Dispatch are among the many news organizations parroting alarmist assertions that global warming is reducing wheat harvests. The Reuters article, for example, cites a study co-authored by several global warming alarmists to claim, “In recent decades, wheat yields had declined in hotter sites such as India, Africa, Brazil and Australia, more than offsetting yield gains in some cooler places including parts of the United States, Europe and China.”

Reuters did not indicate whether it had fact-checked the straightforward claim that global crop yields have been declining in recent decades. Reuters also failed to provide any countering viewpoint, giving readers the impression that declining global wheat yields are universally recognized. Knowing, however, that global warming alarmists and their ventriloquist dummies in the media often make straightforward factual claims that are proven false by objective, verifiable data, I decided to fact-check their straightforward claim about declining global wheat yields.

Not only are global wheat yields not declining, they are rising at a spectacular pace. According to objective U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) data, global wheat yields have risen by 33 percent since 1994. Moreover, there has been a 4 percent increase in areas harvested for wheat, indicating increased atmospheric carbon dioxide, improved soil moisture, and global warming are making more lands suitable for wheat harvests. Cumulatively, the 33 percent increase in wheat yield per acre and the 4 percent increase in land harvested for wheat add up to a near 40 percent increase in the global wheat harvest since 1994.

The spectacular gains in wheat yields show no signs of slowing down as the Earth continues its modest warming. The year 2014 saw the highest global wheat yield in history, exceeding the 2013 yield that had also set a new record.

Looking a little closer at wheat production data, the alarmists’ propensity for telling lies extends far beyond lies about global wheat production. It turns out the alarmists and their media allies are also telling lies about wheat production in the very nations and continents they claim are experiencing wheat production declines — India, Africa, Brazil and Australia.

Alarmist lie? Well I never. Same with media…who would have ever thought it?

Let’s start by looking at Africa. Egypt is the only African nation that cracks the global top 20 in wheat production. In Egypt, wheat output has quadrupled during the past three decades, with the past 10 years producing the 10 highest wheat crops in Egyptian history. This is quite a contradiction to Reuters’ claim that “In recent decades, wheat yields had declined in hotter sites such as India, Africa, Brazil and Australia….”

And it’s not just Egypt, either. Africa’s second largest wheat producer, Morocco, produced its largest wheat crop in history in 2013.

On the other side of the African continent, South Africa alsoproduced record wheat yields in 2014, continuing a trend of rising South African wheat yields that extends back to the 1980s. Taking advantage of rapidly rising wheat yields, South Africans have been able to cut the area cultivated for wheat production to merely one-third of 1980s levels while still maintaining steady total wheat production. This has enabled South Africans to produce additional crops on former wheat farms and return much of the cropland to its natural condition for Africa’s iconic wildlife.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Reuters/Santa Catarina State Police. Police Helicopter Accidentally Discovered A Swastika at the Bottom of a Pool.

Photo: Reuters/Santa Catarina State Police.
Police Helicopter Accidentally Discovered A Swastika at the Bottom of a Pool.

Swastika in Swimming Pool Spotted by Police Helicopter in Brazil

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Oh “Yay”, the Murdering Pedo is on his way back

Killer pedo scumbag out of cash and crying like a baby about it too

The killer pedo scumbag, currently having a holiday in a cockroach infested jail in Brazil, is upset because he is out of cash and can’t afford a lawyer.

Recaptured murderer Phillip Smith has had all his money confiscated, and his family and former business partner are refusing to stump up cash to pay for a lawyer.

Tony Ellis, who has represented Smith in New Zealand, has been trying to arrange a Brazilian lawyer to visit him in jail in Rio de Janeiro. But they all want payment upfront. One had asked for a business-class airfare to New Zealand to discuss the case, Ellis said.

When Smith, 40, fled from Auckland Airport on November 6, he told Customs officers he was carrying $10,600. Read more »

Murdering pedo scumbag doesn’t like hard lag, might return voluntarily, if they let him

Poor little murdering pedo scumbag Phillip Smith doesn’t like life sitting in a steamy cell in Brazil and is contemplating coming home voluntarily.

Runaway killer Phillip John Smith will voluntarily return to New Zealand to escape harsh conditions in the Brazilian jail system, says his lawyer.

Smith was transferred from the notorious Ary Franco Prison to the Bandeira Stampa public jail, part of the Gericino Penitentiary Complex – the largest public prison in Brazil – on Friday.

If the 40-year-old sex offender chooses to fight his extradition to New Zealand, he could face several months in a dangerous and basic South American prison.

Smith boasted from Brazil that New Zealand would have considerable difficulty getting him back – if they caught him.

But given the conditions behind bars, lawyer Tony Ellis said he expected his client would voluntarily return to New Zealand, rather than go through an extradition or deportation process.

“The conditions will be pretty awful in jail,” he told the Herald on Sunday.

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